GUILTY CT - Jennifer Dulos, 50, deceased/not found, New Canaan, 24 May 2019 *ARRESTS* #68

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I’ll always try to balance my experience with some facts if I’m able. Even if that means I can’t hop right on it. Hope everyone understands.
In regards to wages there’s this-
The reality is that IF MT is left in prison it will be months before she is able to get a job. Her best bet is to take the training for cleaning up um fluid spills. No one wants the job but it pays. Jobs like working in the commissary require an inmate to be perfect in behavior; no fighting, no stealing, no cheeking meds, no drug use etc. Many of the women do follow the rules so have those jobs and keep them. If she serves 10+ years she may have that opportunity one day.

BBM -

The question is what is a "fair wage" in prison when you have a roof over your head and 3 square meals a day, things you would have to pay for on the outside. In addition, each prison offers some form of education to help prepare those who would need it when getting out.
Well, we have someone on the board with a relative who can tell us about education opportunities.

And, don't forget that the prisoner is being billed 250.00 per day for that place to stay and three meals. It can't be both ways, can it?

There is something very wrong with our incarceration rates and our incarceration conditions. It is not a place to eat nutritious food, sleep on a real mattress, get an education, and come out reformed and ready to serve your community. Something else altogether happens.

The luckiest are young and healthy enough to survive the atrocious medical "care." And happen to be in a prison where a relevant educational opportunity exists, matched with their level. But this is rare and not in control of the behavior of the inmate. If they need ESL and there is only community college, or they need college and there is only GED, etc, there is a mismatch no matter the inmates motivation.

MOO
 
And I have a feeling MT showed him the Herman report …

Edited to explain pronouns:. Bowman knew about the report. Bowman replied "no" when Michelle wanted to bring it up to LE.

Original post:

He knew about it. Michelle asked him while he was present at an LE interview if she could mention it. He said "No."

MOO
 
I’ll always try to balance my experience with some facts if I’m able. Even if that means I can’t hop right on it. Hope everyone understands.
In regards to wages there’s this-
The reality is that IF MT is left in prison it will be months before she is able to get a job. Her best bet is to take the training for cleaning up um fluid spills. No one wants the job but it pays. Jobs like working in the commissary require an inmate to be perfect in behavior; no fighting, no stealing, no cheeking meds, no drug use etc. Many of the women do follow the rules so have those jobs and keep them. If she serves 10+ years she may have that opportunity one day.
Summary fro @ajksmom post above on inmate wages:

Inmate Wages
By: Katherine Dwyer, Associate Attorney
July 30, 2018 | 2018-R-0179
What are the laws in Connecticut regarding inmate wages for work they perform while imprisoned and how do inmate pay rates in Connecticut compare to other states?
Summary

In general, Connecticut inmates are paid a daily rate of $.75 to $1.75 for work assigned by the Department of Correction (DOC). The actual rate is based on the level of skill required to perform the task. A limited number of jobs are available working in the commissary or, at some facilities, for Correctional Enterprises (DOC-run production facilities that make license plates, plastic bags, signage, and other products). For these jobs, an inmate receives hourly wages of up to $0.90 or $1.50, respectively.

DOC Policies
According to DOC’s directive on inmate pay (10.1), the inmate’s wages are generally based upon a three level system as described in Table 1.
Table 1: Assignments and Pay Rates
1 Work that involves (1) routine, repetitive tasks with only minor variance in $0.75 routine and (2) readily learned skills
Inmates who work in the prison commissary generally get paid hourly, at rates ranging from $0.30 to $0.90 per hour. Inmates who work for Correctional Enterprises also get paid hourly at rates ranging from $0.30 to $1.50 per hour.

DOC Policies
According to DOC’s directive on inmate pay (10.1), the inmate’s wages are generally based upon a three level system as described in Table 1.
Table 1: Assignments and Pay Rates

1 Work that involves (1) routine, repetitive tasks with only minor variance in $0.75 routine and (2) readily learned skills
Inmates who work in the prison commissary generally get paid hourly, at rates ranging from $0.30 to $0.90 per hour. Inmates who work for Correctional Enterprises also get paid hourly at rates ranging from $0.30 to $1.50 per hour.Screenshot 2024-03-03 at 13.00.55.png
 
Edited to explain pronouns:. Bowman knew about the report. Bowman replied "no" when Michelle wanted to bring it up to LE.

Original post:

He knew about it. Michelle asked him while he was present at an LE interview if she could mention it. He said "No."

MOO
Yes, we saw in interview 2 I think that he reached across the table to stop MT but she gave him side eye and continued on with her info on the discredited report.
MOO
 
Well it’s an option, as in optional…and so the Judge used his discretion to grant bail, but not because he was required to grant bail. IMO, $6M might as well be non-bail. The Judge knows a Surety Bond of this amount is 1) a financial cluster to even arrange which keeps her in jail and not on bail; and 2) gives the family time to stew and process over whether it’s worth it for 2 months.
@lucegirl, would expect MT to testify at the upcoming Contempt hearing? If she is found guilty can the Judge take her computer and require that all hard copies and cloud copies be returned to the Court?

Trying to figure out if this Judge can remove the report from MT and possibly Troconis Crew or if that would have to be separate action taken by the State or Victims Advocate or Family Court?
 
Yeah. That ticks me off, except in The case of inmate Troconis.

How is a person supposed to reintegrate to society with that kind of debt hanging over their head? I shudder to look up CT minimum wage, and compare that to the cost of an SRO.

MOO
Bbm, that just made me think of all the people graduating college or university with enormous debt. I am not feeling bad for inmates for any of the items mentioned. It's not a fun getaway. MT will just have to cope like everyone else imo. It's punishment imo.
 
And it’s still an exoneration of FD, isn’t it? “He always made innocent trash runs; we sometimes went, too!”
Not only that- how did Michelle have no idea what was going on if it were typical? How did she not squeeze into any of those chats and texts, "Fotis is saving $20.00 on garbage disposal again, so we can turn around and spend it on coffee and a chocolate croissant. They better not be sold out!"

MOO
 
Well, we have someone on the board with a relative who can tell us about education opportunities.

And, don't forget that the prisoner is being billed 250.00 per day for that place to stay and three meals. It can't be both ways, can it?

There is something very wrong with our incarceration rates and our incarceration conditions. It is not a place to eat nutritious food, sleep on a real mattress, get an education, and come out reformed and ready to serve your community. Something else altogether happens.

The luckiest are young and healthy enough to survive the atrocious medical "care." And happen to be in a prison where a relevant educational opportunity exists, matched with their level. But this is rare and not in control of the behavior of the inmate. If they need ESL and there is only community college, or they need college and there is only GED, etc, there is a mismatch no matter the inmates motivation.

MOO
Prison is painful for many . I Belive that everyone thinks prison is the worst possible experience they have ever known.I feel everyone has a choice in going the right way or the wrong way, if in fact they chose the wrong way they should pay the consequence.
 
A judge can summarily, or on the spot, declare a person in contempt of court is they are disruptive or disrespectful.

In calling for a contempt of court hearing - the judge in effect had the State charge MT with contempt of court. So it will be a mini trial before a judge, not a jury; State has the burden of proof; defendant entitled to a defense; defendant does not have to testify; rules of evidence apply.
@lucegirl, gracias.
 
If KM is going to say he had nothing to do with JFD murder….. look how that worked out for MT.
There is evidence from a cell tower that his cell phone pinged very late (about 11:30pm) near the windsor rod and gun club. Where the human grave with 2 bags of limestone was found.
Come clean and tell the truth while you can. I bet MT wishes she did now.
 
Last edited:
Summary fro @ajksmom post above on inmate wages:

Inmate Wages
By: Katherine Dwyer, Associate Attorney
July 30, 2018 | 2018-R-0179
What are the laws in Connecticut regarding inmate wages for work they perform while imprisoned and how do inmate pay rates in Connecticut compare to other states?
Summary

In general, Connecticut inmates are paid a daily rate of $.75 to $1.75 for work assigned by the Department of Correction (DOC). The actual rate is based on the level of skill required to perform the task. A limited number of jobs are available working in the commissary or, at some facilities, for Correctional Enterprises (DOC-run production facilities that make license plates, plastic bags, signage, and other products). For these jobs, an inmate receives hourly wages of up to $0.90 or $1.50, respectively.

DOC Policies
According to DOC’s directive on inmate pay (10.1), the inmate’s wages are generally based upon a three level system as described in Table 1.
Table 1: Assignments and Pay Rates
1 Work that involves (1) routine, repetitive tasks with only minor variance in $0.75 routine and (2) readily learned skills
Inmates who work in the prison commissary generally get paid hourly, at rates ranging from $0.30 to $0.90 per hour. Inmates who work for Correctional Enterprises also get paid hourly at rates ranging from $0.30 to $1.50 per hour.

DOC Policies
According to DOC’s directive on inmate pay (10.1), the inmate’s wages are generally based upon a three level system as described in Table 1.
Table 1: Assignments and Pay Rates

1 Work that involves (1) routine, repetitive tasks with only minor variance in $0.75 routine and (2) readily learned skills
Inmates who work in the prison commissary generally get paid hourly, at rates ranging from $0.30 to $0.90 per hour. Inmates who work for Correctional Enterprises also get paid hourly at rates ranging from $0.30 to $1.50 per hour.View attachment 487759
Finally! An opportunity for MT to earn an honest dollar.
 
Prison is painful for many . I Belive that everyone thinks prison is the worst possible experience they have ever known.I feel everyone has a choice in going the right way or the wrong way, if in fact they chose the wrong way they should pay the consequence.
Details like this should be in school curriculum, probably starting in 6th grade, to try to deter kids from crime!!
Maybe “mock prison” assignments where you get to wait, desperately, for a job requiring routine and repetition or cleaning up fluids for $0.61 an hour and that nice menu of things you can buy after working a full week.And 3 students share one desk. And the $250 a week bill when you leave.
 
Re: costs charged to prisoners.

A couple decades back I worked for Child Support Enforcement in the state where we lived.

Federally, the taxpayers should not have to cover all the costs of foster care if/when the parents have assets &/or income.

While I was there, a big push was started in the Children's Division to see if the children in Alternative Care qualified for any benefits. Social Security Disability applications were filed for most children, a thorough check to see if a child qualified for Social Security survivor's benefits, and we received cartons of new papers from the county offices regularly. (Nightmare, but job security, ya'know?)

During this time, iirc, inmate charges were started in that state. (Could be off several years, of course.)

Consider inmate charges this way: should @afitzy , @NCmom99 , @Morgan10028 , @Jmoose, and iirc @waldojabba 's taxes pay for MT's housing, food, etc? Plus, Jennifer's loyal friends.

For choices MT made.

Now I absolutely agree with other posters that there are plenty of incarcerated people who cannot pay at this rate & perhaps a sliding scale? (Except that we know this Troconis-Arreaza tribe are masters of hiding assets & intriguing businesss deals.) Some incarcerated individuals are there, imho, because they were assigned the weakest attorney.

Tough issue, but WOW Connecticut values their prison stays!

jmho ymmv lrr
lol at "CT values its prison stays!"

I see why the tax payers resent housing Michelle, but the tax payers also paid to investigate and try her. She spent a poopie-ton of her relatives' money to avoid incarceration. She lost. She has to go to prison. And it's because the tax payers sent her there. They booked the trip. They have to pay.

What gets my goat is she will be able to make it much better a stay than others simply because of money. And she will be able to reintegrate after her sentence because someone in or near her family will hire her in some way.

I don't mind that for her. I think everyone should have the same experience.

As for child support, I'm 100% on board with (fair) prison earnings being garnished, perhaps at a higher rate than average since the prisoner has no housing costs. That could go a long way to keeping a community connection for the prisoner. It also might make the parents or surrogates (shout out to grandparents to babies with incarcerated parents!) have a much better financial experience- if nothing else making visits affordable.

It's not like the state loses anything by paying minimum wage for minimum wage work.

MOO
 
Details like this should be in school curriculum, probably starting in 6th grade, to try to deter kids from crime!!
Maybe “mock prison” assignments where you get to wait, desperately, for a job requiring routine and repetition or cleaning up fluids for $0.61 an hour and that nice menu of things you can buy after working a full week.And 3 students share one desk. And the $250 a week bill when you leave.
I'm pulling my kid right out of that school.
You don't tell a 12 year old it's okay to abuse humans like that. No matter what they did. You don't sink to their level.

MOO
 
Prison is painful for many . I Belive that everyone thinks prison is the worst possible experience they have ever known.I feel everyone has a choice in going the right way or the wrong way, if in fact they chose the wrong way they should pay the consequence.
Well, it's better than being murdered. A murderer is in no position to complain.

But I don't have to endorse cruel and unusual punishment just because some people think only the pain they experience, and not the pain they cause, matters.

Treating those people better or worse won't behavior mod their self-importance away.

MOO
 
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