Dallas schoolgirls excluded from 'Red Tails' movie screening

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by wfgodot, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    What year is this?

    Schoolgirls excluded from Dallas movie screening (AP)
    Any surviving pilots weigh in on this yet?
    more at link above
     
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  3. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    I think most will see this as a slap in the face towards the girls. But it is also a slap at the boys. Were they given a chance to opt out and stay with the girls? What if they weren't interested in the movie? Would that mean anything to the school? I mean if the movie was thought to be only interesting for boys, if the boy wasn't interested in it does that mean they aren't normal boys???
     
  4. AnaTeresa

    AnaTeresa New Member

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    Bad all around. Poor form, school.
     
  5. Gardenlady

    Gardenlady New Member

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    I really, really hate to hear things like this going on in schools. Enforcing gender stereotypes can be so damaging to both boys and girls. My one daughter is not the girly type, but has a huge interest in civil rights, so she would have enjoyed a flick about the Tuskegee airmen. My oldest son is a peacenik like his mom who detests anything about war, and probably would have been unwilling to watch a movie having anything to do with it, even peripherally. My youngest son, who is a preschooler, loves his Legos, but also loves flower arranging (he picks out our fresh flowers every week, and arranges them in the vases at home), and told me today that when he is old enough he wants to drive a gold car with pink hearts on it (which was the most absolutely adorable thing I've heard in a while lol). I'm afraid for him when gets to older grades that teachers or other kids are going to gender shame him right out of the things he enjoys doing and imagining.

    So a big BOO from me for this school district. :furious:
     
  6. angelmom

    angelmom The love stays...forever in our hearts

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    Sounds like this is a big hoopla over nothing. There wasn't room for all of the students at the theater, so the school had to decide to skip it or split them up.

    I'm sure someone had the idea to split them by gender to screen the movies because of the numbers, and also, how else would you decide who got to go? Someone's going to be upset no matter what you decide. (Honestly, you can't win for losing sometimes.)

    I agree that many boys wouldn't want to watch Akelah and the Bee - mine certainly didn't when it came out! And while some girls might be interested in the Tuskeegee Airmen story, I don't think it's a crazy stretch to think it might be more popular with the boys.

    There are lots of times in schools and other places where what the majority would like is how it goes. You aren't going to serve black licorice at the Valentine's Day party just because one kid loves it and never gets to have it; you're going to pick a treat that the majority like. And yes, that one kid probably hates chocolate but you can't please everyone.

    While it probably could and should have been handled differently, this isn't really about the girls being treated like they are "less than" or that the school thought they shouldn't see this movie. It's about the size of the movie theater and some people trying to make up news out of nothing on an apparently slow day, IMHO.
     
  7. AnaTeresa

    AnaTeresa New Member

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    I very much disagree - otherwise, why split according to gender? It was poor planning all around. If the theater couldn't accommodate them, the trip shouldn't have been planned in the first place. They should have planned something for all students or none at all. Separating the group by gender, and then picking different movies based on what would appeal to that gender (which is more tired old stereotypes), IS telling girls they are less than. It isn't hoopla to point out that this is discrimination. Most gender discrimination isn't overt - its subtle, insidious things like separate pink Legos for girls and children's books with male protagonists because boys "won't read books about girls."

    If they had only sent black children to see the movie, and had the white kids stay back and watch a movie with a white protagonist, would it be hoopla to call it discriminatory? Because that's pretty much the same thing.
     
  8. Gardenlady

    Gardenlady New Member

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    Argh I hate the "girls" Lego series! We went to the Lego store this weekend with all four kids, and I'm happy to say that we subverted their insidious little gender stereotypical marketing scheme: my daughter went right past the pink and purple and strait to the Architecture series, and my youngest son (he of the gold car with pink hearts) went straight to the "girls'" series display, and spent a good 10 minutes checking it out, oohing and ahhing over the colors and houses (though he ultimately left the store with a trash truck - because, he says, it came with a banana and two fish with the trash barrels... :confused: :floorlaugh: )
     
  9. angelmom

    angelmom The love stays...forever in our hearts

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    As I said, because of limited seating.

    BBM...I already agreed with this in my post. But I think it would also be a bummer to let this opportunity go by. You can show kids that this is an important subject by taking some of them to see it on the big screen, or you can make them wait until the whole group can see it on a video at school. Either way you do it, I think there is both a good message and a poor message.

    This is not what happened. They wanted to take the kids to see this movie. There was only room for X kids. I'm sure they looked at the numbers (maybe by grade, certainly by gender) to see what group could fit. When they realized the boys could fit, they probably tried to think of an equally appropriate movie for the planned theme and objective (Black History Month) that the girls could see. Akeelah and the Bee is a great choice.

    I don't think acknowledging differences is making girls "less than." I think it's a fact of life. Just like there was not one single guy in the theater when I went to see Twilight, and how we saw zero females heading into a midnight showing of Thor (but boys as young as about 5 on a school night! In costumes! WTH???).

    If you had a bunch of kids and some pink legos and some blue or black legos, but not enough for either group to have all the same (and if, for some reason, everyone had to have all the same color instead of a mixture...this analogy doesn't really hold up) would you give the boys the pink just to be PC? Because that's asking for trouble. Our kids' school hands out binders randomly without considering gender or color, and the first thing all the boys do is try to find a girl to switch with them if they get a pink or even purple one. It drives them nuts because my DD isn't a pink or purple kind of girl and won't switch with them.

    I think it would have been equally poor planning, but less likely to happen because people are so sensitive to even the appearance of racial discrimination. I feel pretty confident that this decision was made in good faith without considering that it would be seen as discriminatory.

    Actually, I take that back; it would have been much worse and is not the same thing. Having been a teacher and raised three children of my own (both boys and girls) I know from experience that there are loose generalizations that can be made about the likes and dislikes of girls and boys. I know of no such generalization about likes and dislikes that holds true for racial differences.

    As I said, not the best plan but I don't think it's even remotely newsworthy outside this community.
     
  10. T4Tide

    T4Tide Verified Registered Nurse

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    Why didnt they just ask the kids beforehand which movie they wanted to watch?

    Had there been too many to choose the same movie, then the school could have had time to make arrangements to view the same movie in two separate groups.

    The probability is that half the kids would have chosen one, and half the other. Problem solved without the drama.

    Where did good old common sense go?
     
  11. ~n/t~

    ~n/t~ New Member

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  12. rossva

    rossva George Zimmerman: Innocent until proven guilty.

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  13. jjenny

    jjenny Active Member

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    If there were two movies offered, they could have given children a choice of which movie they wanted to see. As it appears, they just automatically assumed that females aren't going to be interested in Red Tails movie. Which doesn't seem right to me at all.
     
  14. kline

    kline New Member

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    There wasnt a theater in Dallas big enough to hold the students?
    They couldnt screen it in two shifts?
    It is nice they were actually getting a chance to see the movie.
    History involving the 20th century is sorely lacking in most school curiculems.
     
  15. TrackerSam

    TrackerSam New Member

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    Excellent points. :clap: Plus they could have had 2 showings, splitting the class by number and not sex.
     
  16. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    BBM

    Then why not choose another theatre? Take them in two groups? Choose another movie? Wait until it comes out on DVD and show it in the classroom? Do it on a sign up basis? Or teach a class instead? It just seems like there are so many other options. Gender separation just doesn't seem right.
     
  17. Velouria

    Velouria Don't Drink the Pinellas Punch!

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    EXACTLY!

    DISD is currently in danger of losing approximately 80 million in federal dollars due to misuse. The Texas Education Agency is threatening to withhold funds allocated under No Child Left Behind because the district has provided after-school tutoring to only 40 out of an eligible 29,349 students! DISD has claimed the discrepancy is due to a lack of reliable vendors, but the locals know there has been a LONG history of mismanagement and graft here.

    That field trip to the movies was paid for by - you guessed it - FEDERAL funds.

    Meanwhile, our kids aren't getting the basics, there is talk of closing and consolidating schools. Even the high profile magnet schools like Booker T. Washington School for the Performing and Visual Arts are facing cutbacks.

    I literally thank God every day that my husband and I have been able to send my daughter to private school.
     
  18. Reality Orlando

    Reality Orlando Verified Aquaculturalist

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    I applaud the school system for making the effort to get the kids to see a movie about the courageous Tuskegee Airmen. At a time when budgets are cut to the quick, it's good that the school managed to get the young men, who would most closely associate with these brave servicemen, to the theater during Black History Month to honor these fine Americans. I am appalled that some would even make an issue of this as it scoffs at the efforts of the district to provide excellent role models to the young men in this school. God bless the men who flew so proudly to protect our country, those on the ground who worked to keep them safe and thank you to those at the school who made the trip possible.
     
  19. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    I can only quote from the original post Mr. Carter imagining his late wife's reaction to the Dallas girls being denied the opportunity: "My wife would turn flip-flops." Exactly.
     
  20. jjenny

    jjenny Active Member

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    So I guess young women don't need role models? I really don't see what is good about the school apparently treating young women as second rate citizens.
     
  21. Nova

    Nova New Member

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    The idea that the Tuskegee Airmen are only role models to boys is precisely the problem.
     

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