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DNA Solves Cold Cases/Parabon Nanolabs & GED/Match.

Discussion in 'Resolved Cold Cases' started by Niner, Sep 4, 2018.

  1. sillybilly

    sillybilly WS Administrator Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    Admin note:

    If you are going to make statements of fact, claiming serious flaws or mis-identification, Websleuths requires that you provide examples and links to support your statement. You can't just toss stuff out there and expect others to believe it ... you have to substantiate what you claim.

    If you have an opinion or a theory, please give specifics of what your opinion or theory is based on, why you think that way. Saying things like "I have my reasons" or "will tell you later" is akin to saying "I know something you don't know and I'm not going to tell you".
     
  2. meanmaryjean

    meanmaryjean Verified RN (Pediatrics Specialty)

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    THANK YOU
     
  3. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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  4. Mrs. Badcrumble

    Mrs. Badcrumble The North remembers

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    I had an idea last night concerning the GEDmatch's OpIn policy and how to spread the word: What if we update our signature in our WS profiles? I know it isn't much, it's not "revolutionary", but it's a start, and it can spread awareness to other WS forums and members.

    I took my signature from DNA Doe Project's hashtags, so feel free to copy them to your own :)
     
  5. watcher9

    watcher9 Well-Known Member

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    LaborDayRN, Really?, Trinitee and 6 others like this.
  6. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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  7. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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    An amateur sleuth helped authorities confirm the identities of the New Hampshire murder victims

    An amateur sleuth helped authorities confirm the identities of the New Hampshire murder victims

    By Harmeet Kaur, CNN

    Updated at 10:56 PM ET, Fri June 7, 2019
    https://www-m.cnn.com/2019/06/07/us...-researcher/index.html?r=https://www.cnn.com/

    “Rebekah Heath is a research librarian by day, amateur detective by night.
    Her sleuthing came to a satisfying conclusion this week when authorities confirmed a shocking discovery she made last October about the cold case known as the Bear Brook murders.
    "I still can't believe it," Heath said Friday.
    Officials revealed that they had identified three of the four victims who were found in barrels in 1985 and 2000 in Allenstown, New Hampshire. The woman was 24-year-old Marlyse Elizabeth Honeychurch, who also went by Marlyse McWaters, among other names. Two of the three girls were 6-year-old Marie Elizabeth Vaughn and 1-year-old Sarah Lynn McWaters, both daughters of Honeychurch.“

    Snip

    “It was an answer to a question that had remained a mystery for decades. Authorities on Thursday said the breakthrough was a result of information from relatives, DNA testing, genealogy research — and the diligent research of Heath.“
     
  8. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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    Making a note, Dateline last Friday featured Parabon. I recorded it, will get the episode information.
     
  9. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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  10. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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    Police use of DNA leads to backlash, changes to big database

    “The 95% reduction in GEDmatch profiles available to police will dramatically reduce the number of hits detectives get and make it more difficult to solve crimes, said David Foran, a forensics biology professor at Michigan State University.

    “Law enforcement needs these big databases for the chance that someone might be in there,” Foran said. “Now that they are requiring people to opt in, my guess is that database is going to become very small.””
     
  11. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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  12. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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    Here is another article about DNA genealogy:

    Privacy concerns don't stop people from using DNA tests

    Here is part of the article:

    All users who opt in to its public portal are alerted that their DNA information may be searched by law enforcement agencies investigating a crime or seeking to identify a deceased person.

    In Rogers’ experience, that possibility excites, rather than concerns, many customers. He routinely receives emails from people who want to post their DNA profile to GEDmatch “so they can assist in catching criminals, including those who might be family members, so that any unsolved cases can be solved, and families involved can get closure.”

    CeCe Moore – perhaps the best known scientist in the burgeoning field of genetic genealogy – sees similar sentiments on the popular Facebook page where she posts updates on recently solved cases.

    “They want to be part of solving this,” she told me, “They are web sleuths – and perhaps their DNA could be key to cracking a case.”
    Moore works with Parabon NanoLabs, a DNA technology company that builds the family tree of DNA found at a crime scene to help police identify suspects.

    “People ask us all the time, how can I get my DNA to a place where you guys can solve cases?” Parabon CEO Steve Armentrout told me.
     
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  13. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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    If other posters are interested here is an interview with CeCe Moore from CrimeCon2019:

     
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  14. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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    Here is another article about DNA genealogy and GEDMATCH. I am sharing it because I find the subject interesting and hope others do and it is ok with the moderators:

    Bloomberg - Are you a robot?

    Here is part of the article:

    Co-founder Curtis Rogers said the change was made after the site received significant criticism last month when it allowed Utah police to use the database while investigating a violent assault. Prior to the change, GEDmatch had allowed police to use its data only for rapes and homicides.



    “We feel that this was an ethical issue and we really had to give people the choice,’’ Rogers said. “I can’t imagine why people wouldn’t opt in. We are extremely pro law enforcement.’’

    Another part of the article:

    Bowing to those concerns, GEDmatch made the change to its terms of service three weeks ago. Since then, 50,000 users have opted in to let police search their profiles. That’s not nearly enough to make the database useful, said CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist who has helped investigators solve dozens of cases. Since the change, profiles uploaded by Parabon NanoLabs, the company she works for, haven’t matched with any usable DNA relatives.

    “It’s basically useless now,’’ said Moore. “Our work on any new cases is significantly stalled.’’

    The new roadblock highlights the precarious nature of a new paradigm where a third cousin you’ve never met might lead to your arrest. There are no warrants required for police to search GEDmatch. Deciding who may or may not access the data is solely the responsibility of Rogers and his co-founder, genealogy hobbyists who never imagined GEDmatch would one day be the crux of dozens of criminal investigations.

    “There has to be some ethical and regulatory oversight of law enforcement use of genealogy databases,’’ said Debbie Kennett, a genealogist and author. “GEDmatch should not be forced into the position of making difficult ethical decisions which have implications for millions of people.’’

    Another genealogy website, FamilyTreeDNA, also allows police to search its database. It’s about the same size as GEDmatch’s, so police may shift investigative efforts there. Parabon has solved more crimes with genetic genealogy than any other entity, but FamilyTreeDNA hasn’t allowed Parabon to use its database.
     
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  15. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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    Here is what I consider to be another interesting report about DNA genealogy and the use of it by LE:

    Privacy concerns don't stop people from putting their DNA on the internet to help solve crimes - The Salina Post

    Here is part of the article:

    contains over 1.2 million user-submitted DNA kits.

    All users who opt in to its public portal are alerted that their DNA information may be searched by law enforcement agencies investigating a crime or seeking to identify a deceased person.

    In Rogers’ experience, that possibility excites, rather than concerns, many customers. He routinely receives emails from people who want to post their DNA profile to GEDmatch “so they can assist in catching criminals, including those who might be family members, so that any unsolved cases can be solved, and families involved can get closure.”

    CeCe Moore – perhaps the best known scientist in the burgeoning field of genetic genealogy – sees similar sentiments on the popular Facebook page where she posts updates on recently solved cases.

    “They want to be part of solving this,” she told me, “They are web sleuths – and perhaps their DNA could be key to cracking a case.”

    Moore works with Parabon NanoLabs, a DNA technology company that builds the family tree of DNA found at a crime scene to help police identify suspects.

    “People ask us all the time, how can I get my DNA to a place where you guys can solve cases?” Parabon CEO Steve Armentrout told me.


    Here is another part of the article:

    A screenshot of the Facebook page of the prominent genetic genealogist CeCe Moore. Facebook

    The genetic genealogist Cece Moore finds that doesn’t deter people.

    “They want murderers and rapists and serial killers off the street,” she says of the people who talk to her about contributing their DNA to GEDMatch or similar sites. “These people are willing to make sacrifices for that to happen.”

    The logic she often hears, Moore says, is: “If my second cousin is a serial killer, I want him caught. I want people to pay for these crimes even if its someone I am close to or I love.”

    Research confirms these observations. A study published in the academic journal PLOS Biology in October 2018 found that 79% of 1,578 survey respondents – some of whom had themselves done a home DNA test with 23andMe or other genetic testing site – support police searches of websites like GEDmatch.

    Respondents were most supportive of investigations for violent crimes, crimes against children, or missing persons, leading the authors to observe that “perceived invasions of privacy appear to be tolerable when the purpose is to catch violent or particularly depraved offenders.”
     
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  16. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

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    Fantastic post, thank you.
     
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  17. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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  18. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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    I am posting this because I think the article is interesting and people might want to read it. Although all of the article does not relate to DNA genealogy it does get a mention as does Parabon and GEDmatch:

    Suspect in rape challenges DNA | US | Journal Gazette
     
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  19. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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    One more post from me at the moment and thank God for that I here you all cry. Here is an interesting interview with CeCe Moore where she discusses genetic genealogy and there is a fair bit of information about the investigation in the April Tinsley case:




    Here is a lecture by CeCe Moore:

     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019 at 7:10 AM
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  20. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

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