DNA Solves Cold Cases/Parabon Nanolabs & GED/Match.

Discussion in 'Resolved Cold Cases' started by Niner, Sep 4, 2018.

  1. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,014
    Likes Received:
    69,337
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Navy grad’s 1984 murder solved through DNA evidence, authorities say
    March 14, 2019

    “SANFORD, FL (WKMG/CNN) – A suspect has been arrested in the 1984 murder of a Navy recruit.
    At a press conference Thursday, Seminole County Sheriff Dennis Lemma said investigators have cracked the cold case, with the help of DNA evidence.
    Authorities arrested Thomas Garner, 59, in Jacksonville on Wednesday. They say he’s the man who beat and strangled 25-year-old Pamela Cahanes, a Navy recruit from Stillwater, MN.“

    Snip

    “With help from genealogy service Parabon NanoLabs, Lemma said investigators were able to create Garner’s family tree and, eventually, guarantee he was their suspect by matching Garner to DNA found on Cahanes’ clothing.“
     
  2. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,014
    Likes Received:
    69,337
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Ellen Greytak Is Using Old DNA to Make Sketches That Help Solve Cold Cases | Inverse

    “For 25 years, the case went unsolved. Then, in 2017, a composite sketch of the suspect, created from crime scene DNA, led investigators to Gary Schara. When police arrested Schara, he confessed to the crime.

    “This was someone who had been in their case file, but there wasn’t enough strong evidence to say we should look at him first instead of these other 100 or 200 people,” says Ellen Greytak, director of bioinformatics at Parabon, the Virginia-based biotechnology firm that worked with investigators to crack the case. (The company also keeps updated list of cases it has helped solve with DNA-based composite sketches.)“

    —-

    Novel DNA technique leads to arrest in 1994 cold case murder of young mom
    May 1, 2019

    “Hoellein's father "thought he was going to go to his grave without any resolution as to what happened to his daughter," Vancouver police officer Dustin Goudschaal said at a news conference on Tuesday.

    But in 2018, police reached out to DNA lab Parabon to help create a composite image of the unknown suspect from the DNA left behind at the crimes scene. Analysts were able to predict traits of the killer, including his hair color and eye color, said police.

    Then, Parabon worked with the police department to use a new technique known as genetic genealogy to identify suspect Richard Knapp.”
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2019
  3. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,014
    Likes Received:
    69,337
    Trophy Points:
    113
    DNA Detectives: Scientists combining forensics with genealogy break ‘unsolvable’ cases
    May 6, 2019

    “(InvestigateTV) – Thanks to a breakthrough in how DNA is used, more than 1,000 collective years worth of cold cases across the U.S. have been solved in just the last nine months.”

    [​IMG]
    These are some of the murder victims in cases that Parabon assisted in solving with DNA technology. InvestigateTV illustration.

    —-

    High-tech DNA lab produces sketch of Tavares rapist
    Apr 11, 2019

    “The sketch was produced by Parabon NanoLabs in Virginia, a company that specializes in DNA phenotyping, a process that predicts the physical appearance and ancestry. The company offers its services to law enforcement in a program called Snapshot.

    The company says it can accurately predict eye, hair and skin color, freckles and the shape of a person’s face.“

    Snip

    “The sketch may not be an exact replica of the suspect. Health issues, smoking, drinking, diet and other factors cannot be detected in an old DNA sample.“

    —-

    https://www.seattleweekly.com/news/dna-strikes-again-edmonds-man-77-arrested-in-1972-killing/

    “Over the past year, a new forensic tool known as genetic genealogy led Snohomish County sheriff’s detectives to zero in on a retired heavy equipment operator, Terrence Miller. Based on DNA from the boot, a genealogist had built a family tree for the suspect using public genealogy sites like GEDmatch, where people can upload their DNA profile to search for distant cousins and lost relatives.

    Last summer, the genealogy research pointed to an Edmonds family with six brothers and a sister. One brother was Miller.“

    —-

    Genetic genealogy, discarded coffee cup leads to arrest in Washington county's oldest cold case
    APRIL 12, 2019

    “Investigators say they've identified a suspect in a Washington county's oldest cold case using genetic genealogy and DNA from a discarded coffee cup. CBS affiliate KIRO reports 77-year-old Terrence Miller was arrested at his home Wednesday in the 1972 murder of 20-year-old Jody Loomis.”
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2019
  4. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,014
    Likes Received:
    69,337
    Trophy Points:
    113
    “Familial DNA led to the Grim Sleeper, who killed more than a dozen women in south Los Angeles between 1985 and 2007. He's on California's death row.“

    Snip

    “In the case of the Grim Sleeper, it was a partially eaten piece of pizza, according to news accounts.”

    Familial DNA search might unlock Delphi killer's identity
     
  5. Seattle1

    Seattle1 #LIVELIKELIZZY

    Messages:
    7,240
    Likes Received:
    67,118
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Same ancestry DNA lab used to capture the 'Golden State Killer' helps to solve 52-year-old cold case | Daily Mail Online

    • Susan Galvin was found dead in an elevator in the Seattle Center on July 13, 1967
    • Missing for three days the 20-year-old had been raped and strangled to death
    • For over 50 years her death continued to baffle investigators until last month
    • DNA evidence taken from the scene was matched by Parabon NanoLabs to former soldier Frank Wypych, who died in 1987 and lived near the murder scene
    • The use of the public genealogy databases to solve cold cases has taken off in the past year, since the Golden State Killer breakthrough in CA
    • Larry Galvin, Susan's brother, thanked the Seattle Police Department for their tenacious investigation that has provided his family with a ‘sense of closure’
    Officers provided the Virginia-based Parabon NanoLabs with the killer’s five decade-old DNA, where scientists worked to create a family tree for the killer, using a public genealogy website database.

    Ultimately, the lab identified potential suspect as Frank Wypych, a married Seattle man and former soldier who died of complications from diabetes in 1987.

    Seattle police exhumed his remains from a cemetery earlier this year to collect DNA and confirmed it matched that collected from Galvin's clothing.

    They're now looking into whether he may have killed anyone else while stationed in New York, Alaska and Germany while in the Army.

    ‘It's the oldest case where genetic genealogy has helped to identify the suspect,’ CeCe Moore from Parabon said Tuesday.

    ‘It's amazing the DNA was still viable. The original investigators who collected the crime scene evidence did such a great job, long before they could even have imagined what could be done with DNA.’
     
  6. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,014
    Likes Received:
    69,337
    Trophy Points:
    113
    DNA, genetic genealogy help solve Indiana State University student's cold case murder

    “DNA and genetic genealogy have solved the cold case murder of a 19-year-old woman on the campus of Indiana State University nearly 47 years ago, police said Monday.

    Terre Haute Police Chief Shawn Keen, who worked the case himself for the past 11 years, told a news conference Milam’s killer had been identified as Jeffrey Hand after DNA from the crime scene was uploaded to the genealogy website GEDMatch and produced a match to a distant relative of Hand’s. Hand was 23 at the time of the murder, working as a music records salesman.

    Snip

    “He said the sample was obtained after Parabon NanoLabs in Virginia conducted the genetic genealogy search and made the identification.

    Parabon has used the same technique to help police departments around the country close more than three dozen cold case rapes and murders in the past year. Some of those cases, like the Milam case, had gone unsolved for decades.

    “This type of genetic genealogy can help with other cases,” the police chief said.””

    (More at link, suspect has actually been dead since 1978)
     
  7. dotr

    dotr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    27,035
    Likes Received:
    21,545
    Trophy Points:
    113
    List of suspected perpetrators of crimes identified with GEDmatch - Wikipedia
    This page was last edited on 9 May 2019
    "In December 2018 police forces in the United States said that, with the help of DNA testing, GEDmatch and genetic genealogy, they had been able to find suspects in a total of 28 cold murder and rape cases in the year 2018.[1] Also in December 2018, Family Tree DNA allowed the law enforcement agencies including the FBI to upload DNA profiles from crime scenes to help solve cold crimes. So from then onwards GEDmatch was not the only site that could be used by law enforcement officials to solve crimes using genetic genealogy.[2] As of April 2019, GEDmatch had been used in 59 cold case arrests, as well as 11 Jane and John Doe identifications across the United States.[3]"
     
  8. PaulaDC

    PaulaDC Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    1,329
    Trophy Points:
    93
    RosalindaA, watcher9 and dotr like this.
  9. wary

    wary Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,861
    Likes Received:
    8,453
    Trophy Points:
    113
    The sequence isn’t entirely clear, but I think from what they say that when they dug into the cold case files they found a fingerprint taken from the director’s stolen car, and cigarette butts left in it—and they had DNA on them.

    So—fingerprint matching has come a long way since 1985–they can use computers to match single prints, or even partial prints.

    So—they matched the fingerprint—probably to fingerprints they had on record—and found him. Then they stalked him, got his disposable coffee cup and discarded cigarette butts, and matched the DNA on them to the DNA that they’d found on the cigarette butts that they’d found in the murder victim’s car.

    A cold-case and modern technology success, but, if I understood the article correctly, not a Parabon-type success.
     
  10. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    976
    Trophy Points:
    93
  11. jewelsmac

    jewelsmac No one really knows why anyone does anything

    Messages:
    814
    Likes Received:
    6,654
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Hayward Man Arrested For Cold Case Murder Of Daughter Of Former Stanford Athletic Director

    REDWOOD CITY (CBS SF) — A 74-year-old Hayward man already in custody for a 1973 murder in Palo Alto has been arrested for a second cold case homicide from the 1970s on the Stanford University campus, San Mateo County authorities announced Thursday.

    John Arthur Getreu was charged last year with the murder of Leslie Marie Perlov, who was last seen on Feb. 13, 1973, at her workplace in Palo Alto. Perlov’s body was found lying in a clump of bushes in the foothills above the campus in an area now known as the Dish.

    On Thursday, the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Department announced that advanced DNA testing had linked Getreu to the March 1974 murder of 21-year-old Janet Ann Taylor, the youngest daughter of former Stanford athletic director Charles Taylor. Her body was also found in the area of the Dish.

    Taylor had been visiting the campus before she went missing.

    Both women had been strangulated and Getreu’s DNA was discovered on evidence from the Taylor murder case. Around the time of the murder, Getreu was employed as a security guard by California Plant Protection Services of Palo Alto.

    In a statement, Taylor’s family thanks officers for continuing their investigation all these years.

    “Janet lived life with enthusiasm and courage,” the statement read. ” As a spunky, fun-loving youngest of three children, she added much laughter and joy to our family. She loved animals and cherished her friends. We have missed being able to have her in our lives. Janet’s future was bright. It would have been wonderful to see what she would have done. We can’t ever know all that we missed, but whatever she pursued, Janet would have served others with passion and kindness.”

    We’re grateful today for the diligent, meticulous work of the law enforcement officers whose efforts have resulted in today’s announcement. They’ve done this difficult work with integrity and excellence, and with compassion for our family.”

    Perlov, who lived with her widowed mother in Los Altos Hills, went missing after finishing her shift as a clerk at the North County Law Library in Palo Alto in the afternoon. The 21-year-old’s 1972 Orange Chevrolet Nova was found parked at an old quarry near Old Page Mill and Page Mill roads.

    Three days later, her body was found under an oak tree. The medical examiner’s office determined she died of strangulation by ligature in a homicide.

    The case had gone unsolved until 2018 when the DNA of an unknown man was found on a piece of evidence in the Perlov homicide. Investigators submitted it to a crime lab and Parabon NanoLabs, based in Virginia.

    The company created a genetic profile and submitted the information to a genetic genealogy database, which produced results relating to the suspect’s family tree.

    The sheriff’s office received the report and obtained a sample of Getreu’s DNA and found on Nov. 9 the DNA matched their existing sample from the unknown man.

    “We were able to identify the suspect through familial DNA. He was not in any of the computer systems,” said Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith at the time of Getreu’s 2018 arrest. “We had evidence from 1973 that was preserved that had DNA we believed came from the suspect.”

    Investigators found Getreu was also previously convicted of murder and rape in Germany in 1963, prompting Smith to say her office might be dealing with a newly uncovered serial killer.
     
    Niner, PommyMommy, watcher9 and 5 others like this.
  12. Owutatangledweb

    Owutatangledweb Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,277
    Likes Received:
    3,098
    Trophy Points:
    113
    What is with San Mateo and Sata Clara Counties? So many serial killers in those places!!!!
     
  13. Cagle

    Cagle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    946
    Likes Received:
    1,943
    Trophy Points:
    93

    Now I wonder if there were more. :(

    Greenville County deputies said Thursday they now believe Brook Graham, who is accused of killing her infant daughter, Julie Valentine nearly 30 years ago, also left another infant in the woods one year prior.
    "Today, we were able to sign warrants and charge Brook Graham with unlawful conduct toward a child and also destruction of human remains for the death of what we have learned is Julie Valentine's brother," Lt. Ryan Flood said.

    Baby found in Upstate woods in 1989 was Julie Valentine's brother, officials say

    @Mrs. Badcrumble
     
  14. DSCrime

    DSCrime Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    13
    Police arrest Idaho man in 23-year-old cold-case murder of Angie Dodge

    1996 rape & murder of Angie Doge in Idaho Falls was solved w/ genetic genealogy.

    53-year-old Brian Leigh Dripps of Caldwell, Idaho has confessed to the crime after authorities matched his DNA to DNA left at the scene.

    Also from the article:

     
    all4justice, Niner, Holmas and 5 others like this.
  15. Niner

    Niner Long time Websleuther

    Messages:
    28,839
    Likes Received:
    52,774
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I know!! I used live in Santa Clara & San Mateo counties... glad I did run into one of these serial killers... :eek:
     
  16. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    976
    Trophy Points:
    93
    watcher9, PommyMommy and Suglo like this.
  17. margarita25

    margarita25 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,014
    Likes Received:
    69,337
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Bringing this post over from abby’s and Libby’s thread:

     
    PommyMommy, watcher9, wary and 2 others like this.
  18. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    976
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Here is another recent article in the DNA genealogy debate versus privacy. We all want killers caught and this Sheriff may be right about the technology used but my personal view is I would like the science used in this DNA checked because I am not at all convinced it is quite as fool proof as it is presented and may be prone to misidentifications and mistakes. I might be wrong and we all want killers caught in my opinion it needs to be checked out:

    California Luddite Legislators Disrespect Crime Victims
     
    Suglo likes this.
  19. Gardener1850

    Gardener1850 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    32,595
    Likes Received:
    60,738
    Trophy Points:
    113
    GEDmatch Changes Are ‘Blow’ to Law Enforcement – and Forensic Genealogy

    05/20/2019

    "Within the next few days we will announce a new policy in which initially all DNA kits on GEDmatch will be set to opt-out of use by (law enforcement),” wrote Curtis Rogers, one of the founders in GEDmatch, to a list of law enforcement users on Saturday. “No user kits will be available for law enforcement use in matching unless specifically designated by the owner.”
     
    watcher9, PommyMommy, Suglo and 4 others like this.
  20. jaejae

    jaejae Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    976
    Trophy Points:
    93
    watcher9, PommyMommy and Suglo like this.

Share This Page



  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice