UT Dylan Rounds, Lucin, Box Elder Co, #2

Navyblake

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Wow! Unbelievable… What do we work so hard for?
If you have a property, and you never go there, and you haven't paid the property taxes for 7 years then you're going to be in collections anyway.

This would be a complete and total abandonment of any acknowledgment that you want anything to do with said property

No squatter is going to pay seven straight years of property taxes if they're a squatter obviously they're homeless and can't afford it
IMO

<modsnip>
 
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carbuff

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It's literally the middle of nowhere it has to be these guys.

There isn't a killer or a thief (what the hell is there to steal in a desolate trailer in the middle of nowhere land from a 19-year-old ?)) that's just going to randomly go out in the most desolate area in the United States

E if we play devil's advocate say it was a drifter (it's not) or somebody from the local town, or what not, they aren't going to feel comfortable after murdering somebody just hanging out and digging through everything and finding a power washer and cleaning the vehicle lol.

Never heard of anything like this in my life. This was somebody that knew where things were at, was local, knew how to hide things in the area (caves, ditches ravines, bodies of water whatever) and obviously was comfortable enough to power wash a friggin vehicle after murdering somebody.

Even more convincing if they had previously worked there or knew the family, and knew nobody would have any idea Dylan was missing for several days, and that his family lived in Idaho and he had no children or wife, they definitely could clean things up without worry.

This is Occam's razor 101

Yeah. I totally agree with you. That's not what I said. I was talking about how they did it, not who did it.
 

FlamingoLady

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Random thoughts, going back a bit, but this line of thought kind of got lost in the flurry of arrests and such. BBM.

My own guess would be there was an altercation that lead to DR's death, followed by a coverup. Possibly more than one person involved, especially in the coverup. It could have been over anything--the ranch-related friction that has been mentioned, an argument over the guns, DR refused to give the other guy a ride somewhere, etc. JB has been mentioned as having a bad temper and a fistfight could have turned fatal quickly.

So maybe the killer(s) wore Dylan's boots so they would leave footprints that looked like Dylan's? I picture him/them wearing the boots while using the pressure washer to clean the truck after carrying the body somewhere, so it would look like Dylan was the only one there, but it could have been other locations as well.

I'm not sure how clever I think these dudes are, but if I were writing a detective novel, I'd have them set the truck seat and four-wheel-drive lever wrong to deliberately point away from the main suspects.
But do you really think these guys are that smart?
 

fridaybaker

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If you have a property, and you never go there, and you haven't paid the property taxes for 7 years then you're going to be in collections anyway.

This would be a complete and total abandonment of any acknowledgment that you want anything to do with said property

No squatter is going to pay seven straight years of property taxes if they're a squatter obviously they're homeless and can't afford it
IMO

<modsnip>
I’m not addressing JB’s situation here, but just making a general comment. Not everyone who”squats” and otherwise takes over property, does it because they can’t afford property although, even if they can’t, there are other options.

Some people make it a lifestyle. There are many grifters in this world who have no problem living off of others.

Also, laws vary by state. I have cousins who had a property stolen from them simply because it was vacant land that they planned to improve when they could afford to. They were paying taxes all along, but weren’t physically present on the land. They didn’t live nearby, and when they drove there some time later to start planning, they saw someone “farming” it, and thought “How wonderful. Someone has been able to use the land during this time”. Little did they know that the person doing it was intentionally doing so to get it for free. Which they did.

As far as not paying taxes for seven years, while it is unimaginable to most of us, there are situations where people are elderly, with all that that often entails, or are just experiencing terrible hardship at the moment. I’ve seen many in that situation, literally on the steps of the courthouse for tax sale and are able to finally able to scrape the funds together to stave it off, often through the help of family.

Again, I don’t know what JB’s situation is. These are just general thoughts regarding people taking over property.

On a separate note, we finally won our most recent eviction hearing in Texas yesterday, and believe will be able to get our very own squatter out within the month!!!!
 

Seattle1

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On a separate note, we finally won our most recent eviction hearing in Texas yesterday, and believe will be able to get our very own squatter out within the month!!!!
^^rsbm
Big congrats @fridaybaker!! One of my workmates has an elderly aunt in Tx where a very distant relative long overstayed their welcome of a week of shelter. Although the squatter has never paid a dime of rent or otherwise contributed to the household, concerned family members are told the squatter has to be formally served with eviction. Seems the squatter was aware all along the homeowner asking her to leave didn't matter. :eek:
 

Sunny Day

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It's literally the middle of nowhere it has to be these guys.

There isn't a killer or a thief (what the hell is there to steal in a desolate trailer in the middle of nowhere land from a 19-year-old ?)) that's just going to randomly go out in the most desolate area in the United States

E if we play devil's advocate say it was a drifter (it's not) or somebody from the local town, or what not, they aren't going to feel comfortable after murdering somebody just hanging out and digging through everything and finding a power washer and cleaning the vehicle lol.

Never heard of anything like this in my life. This was somebody that knew where things were at, was local, knew how to hide things in the area (caves, ditches ravines, bodies of water whatever) and obviously was comfortable enough to power wash a friggin vehicle after murdering somebody.

Even more convincing if they had previously worked there or knew the family, and knew nobody would have any idea Dylan was missing for several days, and that his family lived in Idaho and he had no children or wife, they definitely could clean things up without worry.

This is Occam's razor 101
Agree 100%. Excellent observations.
 

Sunny Day

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Squatters in Utah can legally claim someone else's property under adverse possession laws. If a squatter occupies a property for seven years, pays property taxes the whole time, and maintains and improves the property, they have a strong adverse possession claim. Apr 19, 2022
Utah Squatter Laws | GetJerry.com


Wow, I ask the same question @lisette
I would love to know the rationale for creating such a law in the first place.
 

Seattle1

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I would love to know the rationale for creating such a law in the first place.
I've not researched Utah's State Constitution, and do not intend to. This post is speculative, based on general knowledge of the western states.

I think this idea of "adverse possession" might date back to the State Constitutions of some of the western regions of the U.S., influenced by the Homestead Act (1862), where the laws have never been updated to reflect modern times.

For example, the Homestead Act (1862) accelerated the settlement of the western territory by granting adult heads of families 160 acres of surveyed public land for a minimal filing fee and five years of continuous residence on that land.

These were difficult times and I don't doubt that early settlers of the west also included "squatters" who were quick to take possession of land previously worked by others that for some reason had to leave the territory and/or abandoned their property. MOO

ttps://www.archives.gov/milestone-documents/homestead-act
 

fridaybaker

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I've not researched Utah's State Constitution, and do not intend to. This post is speculative, based on general knowledge of the western states.

I think this idea of "adverse possession" might date back to the State Constitutions of some of the western regions of the U.S., influenced by the Homestead Act (1862), where the laws have never been updated to reflect modern times.

For example, the Homestead Act (1862) accelerated the settlement of the western territory by granting adult heads of families 160 acres of surveyed public land for a minimal filing fee and five years of continuous residence on that land.

These were difficult times and I don't doubt that early settlers of the west also included "squatters" who were quick to take possession of land previously worked by others that for some reason had to leave the territory and/or abandoned their property. MOO

ttps://www.archives.gov/milestone-documents/homestead-act
Seattle,
This is what I've understood to be the source of the laws relating to squatting. (I'm from Washington State, by the way.)

Another note on adverse possession and squatting, unauthorized tenants, etc., though. Here is the thing: Yes, there are laws that allow for full possession as long as certain requirements are met. However, what is a property owner to do in the meantime, whilst trying to wrestle the property out of the hands of the people currently living on it? While said person is on the property, most laws won't allow the owner on the property until the issue is settled in court. This can take years. (A simple Justice of the Peace eviction in Chicago right now takes 18 months -yes, one-and-half-years- to even get a hearing. Suppose there is a hick-up in the required Notice to Vacate? Or the court filing for the eviction? Any number of other things? Back to square one. Then, there are appeals to wait on, etc., etc., etc. Remember, each time something is done, such as a Notice to Vacate, you have to wait a period of time before moving on to the next step, wait for the court to schedule a hearing, etc.)

Vacant land might not pose quite as many problems, although I'm sure there can be some, but whatever structure there is (such as the trailer JB was living in) is subject to whatever abuse the squatter decides deal it. They have NOTHING invested in the property generally, and many of these properties become virtually worthless -if the squatters are druggies they often tear out things like copper wiring to sell, etc. Some are made into meth houses, etc. The owner has zero control on what goes on in the place.

In our current place in Texas, our squatter has 11 cats and 3 big dogs. We know someone who has been in it and has said that the bathroom was flooded and that the whole place stinks. I can literally see pictures she's posted on her Facebook of mounds of DIRT in the living room, on the rugs. (What they're for, I'm not sure, but I'm wondering if they're for the dogs when she's too lazy to take them outside.) She's a convicted felon with no credit, multiple evictions, a history of prostitution, and lot's of links to murderers and drug dealers. The police have already seen a known drug dealer exit the house. Does anyone think that we'll ever be able to recoup the thousands of dollars of loss/damage? Not a chance.

Okay, small detour there. Good to get it off my chest, though!
 
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carbuff

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Some of the recent laws are also aimed at allowing city people to reclaim empty properties from slumlords and other such types who have bought property as a tax write-off and never intended to maintain it. There are large tracts of empty buildings crumbling to rot in many urban areas.

You would think they could come up with something that was fair to both good property owners and people who could care for the property, though.
 
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windrower

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I’m not addressing JB’s situation here, but just making a general comment. Not everyone who”squats” and otherwise takes over property, does it because they can’t afford property although, even if they can’t, there are other options.

Some people make it a lifestyle. There are many grifters in this world who have no problem living off of others.

Also, laws vary by state. I have cousins who had a property stolen from them simply because it was vacant land that they planned to improve when they could afford to. They were paying taxes all along, but weren’t physically present on the land. They didn’t live nearby, and when they drove there some time later to start planning, they saw someone “farming” it, and thought “How wonderful. Someone has been able to use the land during this time”. Little did they know that the person doing it was intentionally doing so to get it for free. Which they did.

As far as not paying taxes for seven years, while it is unimaginable to most of us, there are situations where people are elderly, with all that that often entails, or are just experiencing terrible hardship at the moment. I’ve seen many in that situation, literally on the steps of the courthouse for tax sale and are able to finally able to scrape the funds together to stave it off, often through the help of family.

Again, I don’t know what JB’s situation is. These are just general thoughts regarding people taking over property.

On a separate note, we finally won our most recent eviction hearing in Texas yesterday, and believe will be able to get our very own squatter out within the month!!!!

I would love to know the rationale for creating such a law in the first place.

If property owners pay the taxes, etc., on THEIR property, they should have absolute ownership over THEIR property, whether they are physically there or not. A legal deed and property bills paid up should be enough for an owner to have LE come and remove any freeloader.

If an owner wants to let THEIR property sit cared for, but empty and unused, that should be THEIR prerogative. They paid for it.

That some of you are dealing with months/years trying to get someone out of your rightful property is downright scary, ridiculous, and an abomination on our society.

We’d better get busy changing these horrendously unfair laws. Really, how can any of it be legal?!?!

I had no idea.
 
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