UT Dylan Rounds, Lucin, Box Elder Co, #2

indicolite22

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Thank you for the thoughtful reply.

I was aware that other people had been sent to look for him by the grandparents. It’s also important to note that there must have been a reason the mom was not among the first to know. IMO. Was it because it didn’t seem like that big of a deal to notify his mother? Interesting in its own right.

But again, from all known facts about what was found, or most notably not found, was A.) no Dylan and B.) nothing else strange. So the same as I stated in my previous post applies…what actions did anyone take or not take to determine if he was or was not missing due to (quoted from your post):

“…* Endangered due to foul play

* Diminished mental capacity

* Physical disability

* Suspicious circumstances…”

The behaviors, actions and dispositions of the people that knew him and first knew he was missing is very important and relevant to finding him IMO…not semantics and legal definitions of what does or doesn’t constitute someone being missing. JMO.
The definition states "for whatever reason" and later just four of the possible reasons ("some reasons") are given.

IMO, apart from Dylan's absence, his lack of communication was one of the main indicators that something wasn't right. Until his disappearance he had been in daily contact with either one of his relatives or his best friend. His grandmother expected him to call her again on Saturday. He lost his phone/charger before, but would make effort to replace it fairly quickly.
 

Encyclopediablue

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Blood or marks in the mud on the truck. Or simply telltale signs the truck had been driven during the storm. Maybe someone wanted the truck to appear it hadn't been driven that day at all.
I’ve heard locals state it’s utterly pointless to wash a truck out there and that quite bluntly, no one does or would due to the terrain and the importance to conserve the water for using it for the crops and other more vital needs for the farm.

This leads me to believe two very important things: something on or in the back of the truck was obvious enough or thought to have been, that meant it HAD to be cleaned AND/OR the person(s) who did clean it were not from the immediate area to know it was normal to have a dirty/muddy truck. IMO

Also, this person interestingly enough must have been familiar enough with Dylan’s property and belongings to know not only that he had a pressure washer but exactly where it was and how to use it without much effort given the fact it was stated nothing seemed disturbed or ransacked at the property.

It also seems clear this person rushed the process if the wheel wells were missed as stated and shown in pictures that have circulated combined with the fact that the seat position was not changed back. These things paint a picture of someone being in a panic or rush. Someone local who was familiar with Dylan would most likely be familiar with his patterns and day to day interactions to know who may or may not come by or be able to see this potential cover up occurring. Meaning they would possibly be less likely to have been rushed. I think this person was not normally known to be at this property enough to know who may or may not come by but knew enough about where things were. JMO
 

carbuff

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Did Dylan raise animals? I remember farm trucks when I was growing up would be washed in that pattern after hauling livestock. The bed of the truck would be full of manure, some of which would drip down the sides. So they'd pressure wash the box/bed and the back around the tailgate, sometimes up under the wheel wells depending on whether the side of the box leaked.

Which of course is making me think of other things that would leave a mess in the back of the truck that would require it to be washed. A load of fertilizer? A butchered steer? A bleeding body?
 

Encyclopediablue

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The definition states "for whatever reason" and later just four of the possible reasons ("some reasons") are given.

IMO, apart from Dylan's absence, his lack of communication was one of the main indicators that something wasn't right. Until his disappearance he had been in daily contact with either one of his relatives or his best friend. His grandmother expected him to call her again on Saturday. He lost his phone/charger before, but would make effort to replace it fairly quickly.
I’m sorry but lack of communication is not a main indicator if you consider that none of these people got together to compare notes about when they last talked to him. The grandmother sent out two people (non-family) after SHE didn’t hear back. She didn’t call the mom and dad and friend and whoever else and THEN send them out. Once the two individuals said he wasn’t there the grandmother contacted the best friend (again, non-family) to ask when he last heard from him. So why weren’t either parents asked early on if they had heard from him and why weren’t they the ones to initially raise concern if they were in contact so much? Serious question. A 19 year old living on his own in the middle of the desert since he was 16/17 years old is definitely odd but so is the fact his parents are on the middle part of a list of people to know or be notified of his disappearance.

If he was so known to break chargers and phones and rush to replace them at moms house including sometimes in the “middle of the night” according to her…then it seems logical if no one heard from him when they expected to that he broke his phone or his charger. Right? So where would he rush to in order to replace it? Moms house. Right? So logic says the first phone call should have been to the mom to check if she’s seen or heard from Dylan cuz it’s possible his phone or charger is broken again. This case is so strange. JMO
 

indicolite22

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Foul play is assumed for the purpose of this post.

I wonder when (on Saturday) and where (on the farm) the incident started. If in the morning at the grain truck (also near where his boots were found), why did his phone last ping in the general area in mid-afternoon? If hours later, what was he still doing at that location? Wasn't it raining? IMO the first location indicates someone who knew the farm well. That probably excludes most Montello residents.

In the event that he was attacked near his trailer, how did the boots get 5 miles away? Were they staged to point away from someone or some other place?

There's no event on the timeline for Friday 27th. What was Dylan doing that day? Working on the farm? Was he alone? Who knew where he would be on Saturday morning?

More questions: Was his disappearance planned or a result of a random altercation? How many people were involved? Did the perp(s) try to make it look like he left on his own?
 

Encyclopediablue

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Did Dylan raise animals? I remember farm trucks when I was growing up would be washed in that pattern after hauling livestock. The bed of the truck would be full of manure, some of which would drip down the sides. So they'd pressure wash the box/bed and the back around the tailgate, sometimes up under the wheel wells depending on whether the side of the box leaked.

Which of course is making me think of other things that would leave a mess in the back of the truck that would require it to be washed. A load of fertilizer? A butchered steer? A bleeding body?
Thanks for sharing that knowledge and for that observation. Very interesting indeed. As far as I’ve seen Dylan was only growing grain. I don’t believe many people have livestock out there but I could be wrong.

It would be interesting if he did business with a livestock farm and this was a business deal gone wrong. It could be interesting to know if someone in his life close to him does have knowledge and/or connections to livestock transport or a livestock farm IMO
 

indicolite22

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I’m sorry but lack of communication is not a main indicator if you consider that none of these people got together to compare notes about when they last talked to him. The grandmother sent out two people (non-family) after SHE didn’t hear back. She didn’t call the mom and dad and friend and whoever else and THEN send them out. Once the two individuals said he wasn’t there the grandmother contacted the best friend (again, non-family) to ask when he last heard from him. So why weren’t either parents asked early on if they had heard from him and why weren’t they the ones to initially raise concern if they were in contact so much? Serious question. A 19 year old living on his own in the middle of the desert since he was 16/17 years old is definitely odd but so is the fact his parents are on the middle part of a list of people to know or be notified of his disappearance.

If he was so known to break chargers and phones and rush to replace them at moms house including sometimes in the “middle of the night” according to her…then it seems logical if no one heard from him when they expected to that he broke his phone or his charger. Right? So where would he rush to in order to replace it? Moms house. Right? So logic says the first phone call should have been to the mom to check if she’s seen or heard from Dylan cuz it’s possible his phone or charger is broken again. This case is so strange. JMO
By the time his mother reported him missing, she knew that there was no contact with other family or the friend for the last few days. She did it after they compared notes. The grandmother did the sensible thing and called people first who were able to verify if he was on his farm. His friend was next and then the parents. The parents (separately) heard from him every few days. His truck was parked near his trailer, so he didn't go somewhere trying to replace the phone.
 

fridaybaker

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I’ve heard locals state it’s utterly pointless to wash a truck out there and that quite bluntly, no one does or would due to the terrain and the importance to conserve the water for using it for the crops and other more vital needs for the farm.

This leads me to believe two very important things: something on or in the back of the truck was obvious enough or thought to have been, that meant it HAD to be cleaned AND/OR the person(s) who did clean it were not from the immediate area to know it was normal to have a dirty/muddy truck. IMO

Also, this person interestingly enough must have been familiar enough with Dylan’s property and belongings to know not only that he had a pressure washer but exactly where it was and how to use it without much effort given the fact it was stated nothing seemed disturbed or ransacked at the property.

It also seems clear this person rushed the process if the wheel wells were missed as stated and shown in pictures that have circulated combined with the fact that the seat position was not changed back. These things paint a picture of someone being in a panic or rush. Someone local who was familiar with Dylan would most likely be familiar with his patterns and day to day interactions to know who may or may not come by or be able to see this potential cover up occurring. Meaning they would possibly be less likely to have been rushed. I think this person was not normally known to be at this property enough to know who may or may not come by but knew enough about where things were. JMO
Excellent thoughts!

I do want to clarify something, though: My understanding is that the rear wheel wells were washed, but not the front ones, suggesting that the area of "washing focus" was the rear of the truck. Can anyone confirm or comment on this?
 

fridaybaker

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I have always wished that Websleuths had a way to sort of "bulletin board" topics, as a way to keep track of them and mull thoughts in an empirical way. Such as: "All the things we know about the boots, and what they might mean". And: "All things related to the truck washing, and what they might point to", etc.

Trying to keep track of so many facts and ideas related to them without a "reference sheet", so to speak, makes it so unwieldy. Not sure how that would be done, though.
 

MsBetsy

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I’m sorry but lack of communication is not a main indicator if you consider that none of these people got together to compare notes about when they last talked to him. The grandmother sent out two people (non-family) after SHE didn’t hear back. She didn’t call the mom and dad and friend and whoever else and THEN send them out. Once the two individuals said he wasn’t there the grandmother contacted the best friend (again, non-family) to ask when he last heard from him. So why weren’t either parents asked early on if they had heard from him and why weren’t they the ones to initially raise concern if they were in contact so much? Serious question. A 19 year old living on his own in the middle of the desert since he was 16/17 years old is definitely odd but so is the fact his parents are on the middle part of a list of people to know or be notified of his disappearance.

If he was so known to break chargers and phones and rush to replace them at moms house including sometimes in the “middle of the night” according to her…then it seems logical if no one heard from him when they expected to that he broke his phone or his charger. Right? So where would he rush to in order to replace it? Moms house. Right? So logic says the first phone call should have been to the mom to check if she’s seen or heard from Dylan cuz it’s possible his phone or charger is broken again. This case is so strange. JMO
I've followed missing persons cases when the main indicator has been lack of communication. When it is out of character for the missing person, I think police take it seriously.

In this case, Dylan told his grandmother he'd call her back but he never did. He had not been in touch with his friends or family. They searched before calling police, which is not unusual.

I'm not sure why the grandmother didn't call the parents right away. Do we know for sure that she didn't communicate with them? Maybe she didn't want to alarm them? Or thought he would turn up and there would be an explanation?

Candice explained why they weren't initially concerned that they hadn't spoken to Dylan for a few days. She said he didn't call them every day, but talked to someone, whether his best friend or family, on a regular basis. It was after they discovered that he had not spoken to anyone that they became concerned.
 

imstilla.grandma

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No tire traces leading to or from Rounds' red pickup vehicle were found, which Cooley claims was another suspicious discovery according to East Idaho News. It rained in Lucin the weekend he vanished, so if he had left and returned, the dirt would have been marked.

Rounds’ truck was also noticeably pressure-washed.

“There is no mud on the tires, there’s no mud on the rims but the wheel wells are full of mud like they’ve been driven in the rain,” Cooley told East Idaho News. “And when I got in the pickup…the seat was scooted up to the point I didn’t even have to move it to drive. I’m 4’11”, Dylan is 5’11” and every time I’ve ever gotten in Dylan’s pickup, I can’t reach the pedals.”
 

iamnotagolem

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I’m probably being naive in hoping that he ran away to start a new life he knew his parents wouldn’t approve of, but it still seems like it’s possible.

Washing of the truck - his way of extending kindness by not leaving a dirty truck

Leaving behind of boots - he was walking away from his life

Phone call to both parents - saying goodbye without alarming them or them knowing he just wanted to hear their voices one more time. I wonder if he was on his way out when his grandma called.

Granted this is just wild speculation but so is any discussion since there seems to be a lack of evidence pointing to any one scenario.

And now I’m thinking of Madelynn Allen who went willingly to do things she knew her family/church would not approve of and it quickly turned into something less than consensual.

So maybe this is similar, maybe he had planned to go with someone he’d started a relationship but now he’s become a victim. He seems young and naive, probably even easy to manipulate and victimize.
 

kittythehare

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I have always wished that Websleuths had a way to sort of "bulletin board" topics, as a way to keep track of them and mull thoughts in an empirical way. Such as: "All the things we know about the boots, and what they might mean". And: "All things related to the truck washing, and what they might point to", etc.

Trying to keep track of so many facts and ideas related to them without a "reference sheet", so to speak, makes it so unwieldy. Not sure how that would be done, though.
Certainly keeps one on one's toes, but that is a Good thing.
There's not a whole pile of facts here. Very few.
Even LE are stating they are stumped and could take a very very long time to solve, even years.
 

Cat4

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This case has touched me deeply. Regarding living in his trailer, I believe that he did not have water. Did he have electricity? Would internet even be available out there? Am I I correct that he dropped out of high school and had lived on his own out there for a couple years? Thank you
 

carbuff

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I have always wished that Websleuths had a way to sort of "bulletin board" topics, as a way to keep track of them and mull thoughts in an empirical way. Such as: "All the things we know about the boots, and what they might mean". And: "All things related to the truck washing, and what they might point to", etc.

Trying to keep track of so many facts and ideas related to them without a "reference sheet", so to speak, makes it so unwieldy. Not sure how that would be done, though.
It's not quite what you're asking, but many threads do have a separate media and maps thread for posting timelines, links to articles, and so forth. That would at least help us keep track of official information and his mother's videos and so forth.

Mods, could we get a media and maps thread for Dylan's case, please?
 

Laughing

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This case has touched me deeply. Regarding living in his trailer, I believe that he did not have water. Did he have electricity? Would internet even be available out there? Am I I correct that he dropped out of high school and had lived on his own out there for a couple years? Thank you

Living in an RV is a common thing. Not that difficult to tow into town to get water, or have a truck out.

Or, buy a waterbed mattress & store water in an bunk space in the camper.

My Dad used to full-time in his 5th wheel, and has seen it all in the water storage category.

Solar collectors would work great in that environment, maybe a generator sometimes.

IIRC, Dylan lived part of the year with family members?

jmho ymmv lrr
 

Seattle1

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I’ve heard locals state it’s utterly pointless to wash a truck out there and that quite bluntly, no one does or would due to the terrain and the importance to conserve the water for using it for the crops and other more vital needs for the farm.

This leads me to believe two very important things: something on or in the back of the truck was obvious enough or thought to have been, that meant it HAD to be cleaned AND/OR the person(s) who did clean it were not from the immediate area to know it was normal to have a dirty/muddy truck. IMO

Also, this person interestingly enough must have been familiar enough with Dylan’s property and belongings to know not only that he had a pressure washer but exactly where it was and how to use it without much effort given the fact it was stated nothing seemed disturbed or ransacked at the property.

It also seems clear this person rushed the process if the wheel wells were missed as stated and shown in pictures that have circulated combined with the fact that the seat position was not changed back. These things paint a picture of someone being in a panic or rush. Someone local who was familiar with Dylan would most likely be familiar with his patterns and day to day interactions to know who may or may not come by or be able to see this potential cover up occurring. Meaning they would possibly be less likely to have been rushed. I think this person was not normally known to be at this property enough to know who may or may not come by but knew enough about where things were. JMO

Clearly, the Ford truck wasn't washed for Saturday prom night -- it was washed to destroy evidence.

As for water use, DR had his own well, and I believe the water used here was from the retention pond that DR dug. Washing equipment is a normal farm practice and primarily why DR owned the pressure washer.

I've previously opined and agree with rush by the subject -- left the mud cake which may actually prove beneficial after forensic analysis. MOO
 

Seattle1

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This case has touched me deeply. Regarding living in his trailer, I believe that he did not have water. Did he have electricity? Would internet even be available out there? Am I I correct that he dropped out of high school and had lived on his own out there for a couple years? Thank you

I agree about the impact of this case, and you are not alone.

DR only lived on the farm property during the summer (farming season) and would return to Idaho.

Parents have confirmed DR did not return to school post COVID with his class, and not sure if DR has since obtained his GED.

Yes, DR had a generator and cellular/internet data service via Verizon that was deemed sufficient for his intended use.

We recently learned that his parents bought him a washing machine that he immediately hooked up so suffice to say his homesite was self-contained.

Dylan Rounds, 19, had been farming in the desert town of Lucin, Utah during summer months over the past few years. His grandmother last spoke with him on Saturday, May 28 and nobody has heard from him since then. There has been no sign of Rounds anywhere and no activity on his cell phone or bank account, according to his parents.

 

Seattle1

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