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Ebola outbreak - general thread #5

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Harmony 2, Oct 13, 2014.

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  1. Harmony 2

    Harmony 2 Administrator Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    Continue discussion here...

    1) Blogs must be approved before posting.
    2) Please read your post before hitting reply. If your post is personal to someone else, don't post it.
    3) Posts about the political aspects need to be taken to the designated area on the forum.
    4) Post responsibly by linking to information.
    5) Keep information relevant to the disease and steer away from bashing victims, conspiracy theories and race.

    Please adhere to the guidelines above or you may find yourself looking in from the outside for a brief time period.
     
  2. gngr~snap

    gngr~snap Verified Professional Pediatric Nurse

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    Looks like the breach in protocol was one of three possibilities. Dialysis and intubation are two.

    He added that the health care worker, whose identity has not been made public, may have improperly taken off their protective gear or contracted the disease while using dialysis and intubation to treat the original patient, Thomas Eric Duncan.

    http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5972776

    All posts are MOO
     
  3. okiedokietoo

    okiedokietoo New Member

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  4. chipmunk

    chipmunk New Member

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    A poster said kidney failure can not be reversed in ebola patients. Please cite your source. I myself and others I know have successfully reversed and even back up to a normal GFR. What is different in an ebola patient?
     
  5. chipmunk

    chipmunk New Member

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  6. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    I think this is the very important point. Patients become highly infectious when they are near death. Just regular PPE is most likely not enough at that time.

    "At that point, caregivers need to add more layers of protective gear, such as double gloves and a respirator or a full bodysuit. Those kinds of decisions need to be made by managers who are constantly assessing the risk to healthcare workers, Kaufman said."

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/13/us-health-ebola-usa-nurse-idUSKCN0I206820141013
     
  7. chipmunk

    chipmunk New Member

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  8. JeannaT

    JeannaT Former Member

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    I found his statement to be incredibly arrogant. Because a nurse was infected, protocol was breached. ????? How about, we may not know all the ways this virus is transmitted? How about a little humility in the face of the reality that we DON'T know why this old virus has suddenly become so virulent.
     
  9. JeannaT

    JeannaT Former Member

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    Interestingly, I talked to a guy today who works with toxic chemicals, which is not exactly the same thing as living biological hazards, but the protocols for disrobing from hazmat outfits is the same whether you're going to be poisoned/burned by a chemical or infected with a virus. He was a little surprised at the procedure he's seen in this ebola case. ON THE OTHER HAND, the CDC and other health organizations keep saying it's fluid to fluid which is very hard to pass. This virus, according to the media and health organizations, ISN'T like a chemical that can live forever on your hazmat suit.
     
  10. JeannaT

    JeannaT Former Member

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    I'm interested in the infection time frame. With some viruses (chicken pox being one of them) you're contagious before any symptoms appear. I think a lot of viruses are like that.
     
  11. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    The virus was always virulent. The reason previous outbreaks were small is because they were in remote rural areas, so they burned themselves out quickly and that was that.
     
  12. chipmunk

    chipmunk New Member

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    As others have said there is human error, it is real. Still, we need to determine what protocol does work if CDC guidelines aren't sufficient. There are many medical personnel who care for these patients without getting infected. So what are they doing right? Adding layers plus higher level, more protective gear would seem to be the answer.
    Then do follow any improved protocols.
     
  13. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    Ebola is supposedly not infectious until symptoms appear.
    Since so far none of the Duncan's original contacts become ill, it would appear to be accurate.
    Patient becomes highly infectious before death (and after) which could explain why nurse wearing PPE got sick, but people who were around Duncan didn't (at least so far).
     
  14. Yoda

    Yoda Master

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    http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/national...78932951.html?_osource=SocialFlowTwt_DFWBrand
     
  15. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    How do they know it was human error? It's just speculation that nurse breached the protocol. She doesn't say she breached protocol. Yet they are assuming it anyway.
     
  16. WideOpen

    WideOpen Well-Known Member

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    I finally caught up and just feel terribly angry and disappointed at the lack of preparedness by, well...who do you blame?
    Anyone with half a brain could reason that either sooner or later we here in the US were going to be faced with this. For hospitals and communities to be in the dark seems so ignorant. I expect a large sector of the American public to have their head in the sand but the professionals and high ups should have been alert to this threat.

    Also, for those who "scold" those of us who are preppers, or conspiracy nuts, or worry warts...can you blame us? We are getting mixed messages and reading plenty of conflicting data. I found this article (quoted, linked below) interesting because it shows we aren't the only ones paranoid. No one knows! I think we are all correct to be concerned and be paying very close attention and to those we can trust.

    Attorney general attempts to block Ebola waste disposal in Louisiana

    jmo
    Night all! praying for the nurse in Texas, this should never have happened.
     
  17. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    Well, we cut budgets to CDC, to NIH.
    So I guess it's not surprising there is lack of preparedness.
     
  18. SeekingJana

    SeekingJana Well-Known Member

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    It's most likely part of a post I wrote in the closed thread #4 that said once Duncan had entered the hemorrhagic phase of Ebola, hemodialysis and mechanical ventilation were last- gasp measures.
    I stand behind my post and my words, if this is the post you are referring to. He was actively dying of an infectious process called the Ebola virus.
    When someone has successfully restored normal GFR in the hemorrhagic stage of Ebola, I hope they are published in JAMA, NE Journal Of Medicine, etc. and so forth.
    I don't think there is a documented case of hemodialysis or intubation saving an Ebola- infected person's life when it was initiated as late as Mr. Duncan's was.
    He was intubated and started on hemodialysis on Oct. 7 as " last ditch" efforts. He was pronounced deceased on the AM of Oct. 8. My sources are CBS- Dallas, Dallas Morning News,WFAA.com and every other local DFW news outlet, and national news outlet as far as the U.K. Daily Mail. Timelines are available for his treatment and deterioration. The treatments didn't harm him, but they were too late to help him.

    This is my last comment for a while, as things are being taken out of context now. :)
     
  19. chipmunk

    chipmunk New Member

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  20. gngr~snap

    gngr~snap Verified Professional Pediatric Nurse

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    Preppers...
    My dad has a six word answer to that.
    In his opinion...
    "People thought Noah was crazy too."

    He is prepared for martial law... He has a rather surprising plan in the event of a short lived "blip"
    Like only 6 weeks, but it's a plan. If he never needs it great!
    If he does... Don't come knocking on his door if you poo pood him. Too late.
    Moo

    All posts are MOO
     
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