Ethiopian Air ET302, Boeing 737 crashes - 157 souls - 10 March 2019

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by MsFacetious, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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  2. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    Boeing are too busy trying to spin this PR disaster, get the Frankenstein Max plane back in the air, keep losses to a minimum and keep the share price satisfactory to care about the people who were killed and their families. The executives should be in jail.
     
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  3. PrairieWind

    PrairieWind Verified Attorney

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  4. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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  5. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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  6. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    A French widow has filed a lawsuit against US aircraft manufacturer Boeing for $276 million in damages over the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 in March, which killed all 157 people on board -- including her husband.

    Frenchwoman Nadege Dubois-Seex, whose husband Jonathan Seex died in the accident, filed the suit against Boeing in Chicago, where the company is headquartered.

    "It is a tragedy which, by definition, could have been avoided, because it had already happened five months before. How could they stay deaf to this warning?" Dubois-Seex told reporters in Paris on Tuesday, referring to another Boeing 737 Max 8 in Indonesian company Lion Air's fleet that crashed last October, leaving 189 people dead.

    French widow sues Boeing for $276 million over Ethiopian Airlines crash - CNN
     
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  7. Hatfield

    Hatfield Well-Known Member

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    I would love to get a look at the "fix" they put in for this.

    I am betting that I would still not be happy with it. From reviewing the earlier posts about this case and the other accident, I am planning to never fly this plane again if I can help it.

    Because from what I gathered the plane itself also had "structural balance" issues to begin with. My take on it is that they incorporated use of the "MCAS automatic anti-stall" feature to help the plane maintain proper balancing when taking off instead of fixing the balance issues which obviously would be a major costly endeavor. And we all know how the MCAS system failed miserably and would porpoise the nose of the plane.

    It is one of the most harrowing disasters I could imagine a pilot experiencing. Here we had the pilots trying to bring the nose back up and then the faulty MCAS system would force the nose of the plane back down.
    Can you just imagine being a pilot in that situation when the plane itself is going against what you are trying to do.

    And with the plane being close to the ground already during takeoff, there is just not enough altitude for this sort of battle to take place. They lost altitude each cycle of porpoising until the ground was upon them.

    My "fix" would have been 2 fixes.

    1-First fix the initial balancing issues by adding weight to whatever sections of the plane needs the weight to help balance it.
    Of course airlines dont want to add weight to a plane but by golly if it needs to be balanced then weld in and add weight somewhere and balance it.

    2-Then my software "fix" would be a simple new command at very top of the MCAS software:

    "Exit the MCAS System!!!!!"

    Let the pilots do their job and fly the plane. Automatic pilot is fine but get rid of this new faulty automatic "MCAS anti-stall system" that kills.

    Its a brand new system and pilots dont have to have it. Pilots were perfectly fine before the development of this MCAS system and they will be fine after its gone. Get rid of this animal. Its proven to kill people and even if they got it working as designed then I would still not want it as a pilot. Because if I want to pull up the nose of the plane more severe than normal then it means I want to do that for a very good reason. Like avoiding a crash with the ground for example.
    So let me do my job of flying for goodness sakes.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2019
  8. JudgeJudi

    JudgeJudi Well-Known Member

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    The families of Boeing crash victims could be left with nothing

    If past experience is a guide, US aviation-law specialist Mike Danko told Quartz, virtually every family member of every victim killed in the two crashes may eventually file suits against Boeing. Efforts to seek compensation will depend entirely on whether the cases remain in the US or are repatriated overseas, the California-based attorney said: “If those cases are transferred, then they become worthless.”

    The US legal system compensates people for the loss of life to a greatly different standard than in other countries, Danko said. If the cases are moved overseas, the amount of compensation that could be sought is much, much less. “The cases cannot be economically pursued, and essentially they’re not worth bringing.”

    If the cases are allowed to remain in the US, it will be “very difficult for Boeing,” who may face damages well above and beyond normal compensatory measures. “Seldom has there been a case where there appears on the surface that there has been such a disregard for the lives of flying customers,” Danko said. Hefty damages imposed by a judge may be “designed to punish Boeing and make an example of them so that other customers don’t suffer the same fate.”

    Boeing has not commented on the suits. In a May 16 statement, the company said it maintained a “commitment to our values, including safety, quality and integrity, because we know lives depend on what we do.”

    Boeing crash victims' families could be left with nothing

    Words fail me.
     
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  9. MsFacetious

    MsFacetious What a Kerfuffle...

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    "It is a tragedy which, by definition, could have been avoided, because it had already happened five months before. How could they stay deaf to this warning?" Dubois-Seex told reporters in Paris on Tuesday, referring to another Boeing 737 Max 8 in Indonesian company Lion Air's fleet that crashed last October, leaving 189 people dead.

    French widow sues Boeing for $276 million over Ethiopian Airlines crash - CNN

    Yes ma'am. You are absolutely right. We agree with you and support you.
     
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  10. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    There’s no schedule for re-certifying Boeing’s 737 Max and getting the plane back in the air, the U.S. Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) said on Thursday, after a day of discussions with aviation regulators from around the world.

    “The last thing I want is to put a date out there for lifting the grounding,” said Dan Elwell, acting administrator for the FAA.

    Elwell gave a fairly upbeat assessment of the dialogue between regulators during the day-long meeting at the FAA office in Fort Worth, Texas, where 57 industry leaders from 33 countries met two months after Boeing’s 737 Max was grounded.

    FAA says there's no schedule for re-certifying Boeing 737 Max plane yet
     
  11. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    “American Airlines’ pilots’ union has hit back at Boeing for insinuating that some responsibility for the two crashes of its 737 Max jets lies with the pilots, and claimed AA pilots made several suggestions to Boeing to fix the plane’s anti-stall systems before the second crash.

    Describing Boeing’s position as “inexcusable”, Dennis Tajer, a spokesman for the Allied Pilots Association, accused Boeing of unfairly blaming foreign pilots involved in the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes.

    Tajer told CNN: “Shame on you. We’re going to call you out on it. That’s a poisoned, diseased philosophy.” Asked if the Ethiopian crash might have been prevented if Boeing had acted on the US pilots’ concerns, Tajer said: “I think that’s a fair conclusion.”

    American Airlines union: blaming pilots for Boeing 737 Max crashes 'inexcusable'
     
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  12. MsMarple

    MsMarple Well-Known Member

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    American Airline cancellations due to 737 Max now stretch past Labor Day - CNN
     
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  13. JudgeJudi

    JudgeJudi Well-Known Member

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    How much longer will the 737 Max be grounded? No one really knows.

    Boeing insists it is making progress on getting its fix for the troubled jet approved by the US Federal Aviation Administration, which it needs to put the Max back in the air. But the company has stopped giving any public estimates about when that approval might come.

    The fatal crash of an Ethiopian Airlines plane that prompted the grounding happened three months ago this week. At the time, Boeing extended condolences to the family members of the victims and said it expected a fix "in the coming weeks."

    Those weeks came and went. After the FAA said in early April that
    additional work would be needed, Boeing again suggested it would be only a short delay and said the fix would be "completed in the coming weeks." Months later, it's clear the initial time frame proved far too optimistic.

    Asked Tuesday for the latest estimate for a return to service for the 737 Max, neither Boeing nor the FAA could give a time frame.

    Will the plane be back in the air before the end of 2019? That's what Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg was asked last week on CNBC -- and he was notably vague.

    "I do," he replied. "But again, I can't give you the specific timeline on it."

    The Boeing 737 Max grounding: No end in sight - CNN
     
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  14. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    “More than 80 per cent of business travel managers are concerned about flying on the Boeing 737 Max and two-thirds think their employees might change travel plans to avoid the aircraft even after it has been deemed safe to return to the skies, according to a new poll. The survey, conducted by the US-based Global Business Travel Association for the Financial Times, is one of several recent opinion polls aimed at gauging passengers’ views of the plane, which has crashed twice since October, claiming 346 lives”

    Subscribe to read | Financial Times
     
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  15. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    American Airlines has a plan for convincing consumers that the Boeing 737 Max aircraft in its fleet are safe for flight: Stick their top brass on them and see how it goes.

    American Airlines chief Doug Parker said during a shareholders meeting this week that executives and other staff would take flights on the 737 Max jets before the carrier would ask its customers to do so, Bloomberg reported Thursday. That is, hm, certainly one idea

    In an emailed statement to Gizmodo about the move, a spokesperson for American Airlines said that it is “confident that the impending software updates, along with the new training elements Boeing is developing for the MAX, will lead to recertification of the aircraft soon.”

    https://gizmodo.com/american-airlines-wants-to-win-back-trust-in-its-737-ma-1835501672
     
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  16. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    The CEO of Boeing has admitted the company made a 'mistake' in handling a problematic cockpit warning system in its 737 Max jets before two crashes of the plane killed 346 people.

    Chief executive Dennis Muilenburg promised transparency as the U.S. aircraft maker tries to get the grounded model back in flight.

    Muilenburg told reporters in Paris on Sunday that Boeing's communication with regulators, customers and the public 'was not consistent' and that is wasn't acceptable.

    Boeing CEO admits the company made a 'mistake' in 737 Max jets | Daily Mail Online

    How this man still has this job is amazing to me he should be fired ASAP.
     
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  17. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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  18. Pi Thoughts

    Pi Thoughts Well-Known Member

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    A class-action lawsuit against Boeing reportedly accuses the US aviation giant of covering up the faulty sensor issue and keeping pilots in the dark about the feature in the pursuit of quick returns.
    The legal action was started by a pilot, identified only as ‘Pilot X’ in court documents, which were seen by the Australian Broadcasting Company. He was joined by over 400 fellow pilots, trained to fly the fourth-generation narrow-body 737 MAX aircraft. They accuse the Chicago-based aviation corporation of hushing known concerns about the glitch-ridden equipment installed on the jets.
    400+ 737 MAX pilots sue Boeing over ‘unprecedented cover-up’ that led to crashes & grounding
     
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  19. Hatfield

    Hatfield Well-Known Member

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    JMO
    I wonder if this was a two-for-one sale or something as Boeing tries to unload planes that nobody wants. The price may have been too good to refuse.

    I wouldnt be comfortable on them no matter the price.
     

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