First advize then advise

Discussion in 'JonBenet Ramsey' started by Holdontoyourhat, Nov 20, 2009.

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How did PR misspell advise in her exemplars?

  1. She knowingly misspelled advise.

    13 vote(s)
    86.7%
  2. She knew but later forgot how to spell advise.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. She didn't know how to spell advise correctly.

    2 vote(s)
    13.3%
  1. Holdontoyourhat

    Holdontoyourhat Former Member

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    PR spelled the word 'advise' incorrectly in ALL of her exemplars, both right and left handed. She spelled it 'advize'.

    The RN author spelled it correctly.

    If PR wrote the RN, then the question is raised: How did she spell 'advise' in the RN and then later spell 'advize' in her exemplars?

    There seem to be two choices for RDI. Either she did it on purpose, or she forgot how to spell 'advise' between the time she wrote the RN and the time she did the exemplars.
     
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  3. cynic

    cynic Active Member

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    Do you for some reason feel that PR doing this intentionally is inconceivable??
    Consider this HOTYH, we all know words that really jump out as glaring mistakes when we see others use them incorrectly, mistakes that we would never make. While some of my favorites are not spelling mistakes, as much as word usage issues, I would strongly consider throwing them in if I was trying to be deceptive.
    If I could, I would use “irregardless”, there instead of their, possibly use Canadian/British word variants such as colour instead of color, behaviour instead of behavior etc. The English language is a goldmine of possibilities.
    If the opportunity of advise/advize came up, why not take it?
     
  4. Holdontoyourhat

    Holdontoyourhat Former Member

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    .

    If PR wrote 'colour' in both her right and left exemplars, and the RN had the word 'colour' in it, that would be something. A distinctive or rare spelling or application of a word.

    Too bad there aren't any of those.

    Instead, the wife of a multi-millionaire businessman not too surprisingly can spell business in both her right and left exemplars with no problem, but the RN author clearly spells it 'bussiness'.

    Not only that, PR seemed determined to misspell advise in both right and left exemplars, while the RN author spelled it correctly.

    I just hope you know how ridiculous it sounds to make the claim that PR misspelled deliberately, sometimes in the RN and sometimes in her exemplars. And the speed with which this explanation was dreamed up to account for this information when it was first learned. And the obvious lack of proof or corroborating evidence that PR ever deliberately misspelled anything at any time. It truly is circular reasoning at its finest.

    Can RDI find one instance where PR was inconsistent in her spelling of a word?
     
  5. cynic

    cynic Active Member

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    I’m sorry that you think PR is a moron, incapable of taking the most elementary steps to save her "behind".
    What would you have her do, replicate the ransom note perfectly???
     
  6. Holdontoyourhat

    Holdontoyourhat Former Member

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    Nobody even noticed the 'advize' thing for years. It is too subtle for your idea to be plausible. How could it be seen as a 'behind saver' when nobody even notices?

    She would've been taking major steps backwards to save her behind by simply writing the note. JBR basement crime scene was enough evidence of intruder.

    Would you save your behind by writing a 350 word, 1500 character ransom note and leaving it at the scene of a capital child murder?

    I didn't think so.

    Equally ridiculous is the idea that someone who lived there would EVER do this. Or that LE would even consider they would.
     
  7. cynic

    cynic Active Member

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    It’s down to state of mind. It doesn’t matter what we think or what we would do, it’s what PR thought would be effective.
     
  8. Sophie

    Sophie New Member

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    Actually, HOTYH, I noticed the 'advize' thing because some buffoon on the forums started claiming that that was the British spelling of 'advise.'

    I'm with Cynic: Patsy was a very clever woman and it is typical of IDI that they don't show her the respect of acknowledging that she had the brains to execute the cover-up and keep it covered up.
     
  9. SuperDave

    SuperDave Active Member

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    Thank you!
     
  10. Tadpole12

    Tadpole12 Well-Known Member

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    Hi hotyh....

    hmmm .... easy for someone who rarely misspells to place common errors within a text. For sure, as cynic comments, easier for an American or Brit, spelling being fixed/distinct.

    PR as rn writer, diabolical misspeller?,
    maybe the placement of the z, was an attempt to further distance herself from the original 'patterned' misspellings, and to illustrate that PR errors of habit center on the z,c,s combos?

    hotyh?
    how many spelling errors within the approx 400 word rn?
     
  11. madeleine

    madeleine New Member

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    Can't vote.
    IMO she misspelled it because she was panicked.It happens to me too.
     
  12. redeemed

    redeemed New Member

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    patsy ramsey wrote the ransom note.period.
     
  13. Chrishope

    Chrishope New Member

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    Actually, the fact that she had a degree in journalism strongly suggests she deliberately misspelled "advize" in the exemplars.
     
  14. Sophie

    Sophie New Member

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    Hi Tadpole. Wrt your comments about mispellings etc, have you ever read 'Gaudy Night' by Dorothy L. Sayers? It's one of her Lord Peter Wimsy novels and it relates to a posion letter campaign at one of the first women's colleges at Oxford University. There is extensive discussion of this type of thing in that novel. It's sort of apt here because the poison pen in the book misspelt some easy words but got some hard ones right and also quoted extensively from The Iliad etc which seemed to point to someone wanting to look dim bit being unable to hide their intelligence and education.

    Your comments about spelling differences between US and British English are interesting because it's so easy to start getting used to the 'other' spelling. After a while on here, I usually go over to some English sites and I invariably spend a second or two wondering why everyone has started misspelling words like 'criminal defence.' Also, within Britain, there are variations where people in some places use the US spelling. For example, it was a tradition among Oxford graduates to use 'z' instead of 's' (which coincidentally is a clue in an Inspector Morse novel) and people in the West Midlands use 'mom' instead of 'mum.' There aren't that many words in the RN that are typically US/British but expressions like 'Law Enforcement' are more US than British.
     
  15. Sophie

    Sophie New Member

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    Agree. Plus the carels used in the note point to someone with training in journalism, proof-reading etc.
     
  16. Holdontoyourhat

    Holdontoyourhat Former Member

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    In reality though, this is only what you are imagining PR thought would be effective, isn't it?

    And, then stating as if it were known fact?
     
  17. cynic

    cynic Active Member

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    I can’t believe you're arguing a very straightforward statement.
    I wasn’t imagining or implying anything about PR. I’m just not limiting her abilities as you are, and consequently ruling out the possibility that in her mind she thought this would be effective.
    State of mind is what it is.

    Perhaps if she was a trained member of a small foreign faction “familiar with law enforcement countermeasures and tactics,” she might not have made that “mistake”.

    I believe someone who is a bit of a “drama queen” with flair for writing might not miss the opportunity to show their "talent".

    “In Atlantic City during the Miss America pageant, Patsy's dramatic reading won her a non-finalist talent award and a $2,000 scholarship, which helped pay for her education at West Virginia University.”

    “In her senior year, she ran the Student Services Committee, served as membership chairman for her sorority, Alpha Xi Delta, made the dean's list and earned a degree in journalism with a concentration in advertising.”

    http://denver.rockymountainnews.com/extra/ramsey/10xxram5.shtml

     
  18. SuperDave

    SuperDave Active Member

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    I'll make this quick and then I'll shut up.

    HOTYH, sometimes in life, our imaginations are all we have to go on.

    I believe Sir Arthur Conan Doyle said it best: "it is in the imagination that crimes are conceived, and it is in the imagination that they are solved.."
     
  19. Holdontoyourhat

    Holdontoyourhat Former Member

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    Its when we state what we have only imagined as if it were fact. This is disinformation.

    I think we can keep a certain respect for the difference between imagination and, say, reality.

    Or can we?

    Imagined: prior abuse, PR wrote the note, crime scene staging. These are all merely imagined ideas, thats all. Not one known fact here. Frequently stated as fact though.

    Reality: JBR was strangled to death, a long note was discovered that included references to wealth and nationality, DNA was discovered but its owner not identified, the case is unsolved, there have been no charges filed.
     
  20. SuperDave

    SuperDave Active Member

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    Agreed. I couldn't have said it better myself. Just keep an open mind.

    You had me in your corner for a while. Should have known that wouldn't last.

    But allow me to say this: every one of the things you list MIGHT (and I hold pretty strong reservations about "might") be imagined, but they all have a real basis.

    True. But I could give you some reality of my own.

    (As the Ultimate Warrior): Next time we meet, I bring you Ultimate Reality!
     
  21. DeeDee249

    DeeDee249 New Member

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    The prior abuse is a fact. Not imagined, but discovered at the autopsy and discussed by the coroner with LE attending the autopsy.
     

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