FL FL - Sumter Co., 'Little Miss Panasoffkee' WhtFem 470UFFL, 17-24, Feb'71

Discussion in 'The Unidentified' started by smile22, May 5, 2005.

  1. smile22

    smile22 Live Laugh Love

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    i remember once watch unsolved and they had this story on this missing teen or child i think it was. i think i remeber them calling her something panasnofshkie she was a jane doe and no one has ever claimed her does anyone know what im talking about..
     
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  3. jaybird

    jaybird Pop Culture Princess

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    I think I remember seeing that story on "Unsolved Mysteries." They called her "Little Miss Panoshonske (?)" As far as I know she has still not been claimed.
     
  4. shadowangel

    shadowangel Black cats consider me unlucky.

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    Miss Panasoffkee-shw was discovered near Lake Panasoffkee in FL-that's all I remember, can't find anything on the web though it seems several lawenforcement in the area really took the case to heart
     
  5. smile22

    smile22 Live Laugh Love

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    would anyone be intrested in solving her case? pm me and let me know, i also did a search with miss and that last long name. then i did a search on jane doe found in lake and on lake p... i also did a search on body found on lake ... in yahoo and google and i found nothing. but i did find a webpage on lake p.. i was thinking of emailing them see if they remember anything or knows anyone who does.
     
  6. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    The case that you are referring to was that of an unknown woman found in Lake Panasofke in Sumpter County, Florida in February of 1972. She was near Highway 75, north of Tampa and about 50 miles Northwest of Orlando.

    She had been strangled some days or weeks earlier and was wearing only her underclothing. I do not recall that she had any nickname, and I have never seen her on the Doenetwork or other such websites. Her case was featured on Unsolved Mysteries in late 1992 or early 1993.

    She was believed to be aproximately 20 years old, Caucasion or American Indian, 5 feet two inches tall, 100 Pounds. The Medical examiner believed that she had once had a child. She had extensive dental work: fillings, crowns, and caps. She had also had orthopedic surgery on her right ankle, with what was known as a Watson-Jones Technique.

    Police did not feel that she was a "local", as there were no reported/known missing persons of her description in that area and no one called with any information following 20 years of efforts to identify her. The case is still open and is in the jurisdiction of the Sumpter County Sheriff. Last phone number I had for them was (904) 793-0222.

    This case was unique in that investigators first used the artist's technique of not only sketching her face, but then "age regressing" it to what she may have looked like when younger - I think at ages 12 and 6. Their idea was that although somebody might not recognize her at age 20, they might recognize her from an earlier time.

    The case officer in 1993 was Chief Ed Galvin. I spoke to him on 19 February 1993. He was an older man, and had been involved with the case for over 20 years. We discussed several possibilities, among them that she might have been a victim of Serial Killer, Paul John Knowles (1946-1974). Chief Galvin was also very familiar with Knowles, because the Florida Police officer whom Knowles had murdered during a killing spree in 1974 was Galvin's partner.

    Knowles often traveled Highway 75 from Florida to Georgia. In 1965, he kidnapped a police officer and got 5 years. By 1967, he was paroled and soon back in prison the same year. In 1970, he was again out on parole, and was loose until 1972 when he was again sentenced to prison. In May 1974, he was again released on parole and in July of that same year, he began a three state killing binge of 18 to 20 victims. In September 1974, he was captured in Georgia, and in December 1974, he was shot while attempting to escape. His story was detailed in a book by an English woman named Sandy Faulkes who traveled with him and knew him in 1974.

    The murder of this young woman has never been solved, although it fit Knowles' pattern in several ways. She has also never been identified. The possibility of her having been in the military was considered, but not conclusively proven. It is certain, however, that she is somebody's daughter and somebody's mother. Perhaps they are still looking for her.

    I have copies of the artist sketches for this young woman, and would be happy to supply them to the Doenetwork, should they decide to feature her case.
     
  7. smile22

    smile22 Live Laugh Love

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    i wonder if they have an email the police department that was handling her case. it has always stuck in my mind her story on unsolved when i was little i must have been 13 when her case was on unsolved. ive done so many searches on various search sites and have found nothing on her.. did they find any clothing when she was found? did they look outside of florida for answers?
     
  8. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    As I recall, the only clothing found with the body was underclothing. She had been strangled, and the ligature, rope, or clothing item used was still tied around her neck. Here is the address to the Sumter County Sheriff's Office and their website.


    Sumter County Sheriff's Office
    William O. "Bill" Farmer, Jr - Sheriff
    225 East McCollum Avenue
    Post Office Box 188
    Bushnell, Florida 33513
    (352) 793-0222

    Link

    http://www.sumtercounty.com/govern.htm
     
  9. marylandmissing

    marylandmissing New Member

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    Send away :)
     
  10. anthrobones

    anthrobones New Member

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    http://doenetwork.org/cases/470uffl.html




    Unidentified White Female




    • The victim was discovered on February 19, 1971 in Lake Panasoffkee, northwest of Orlando, Florida
    • Estimated Date of Death: Two to three weeks prior to discovery
    • Killed by Homicide by strangulation



    Vital Statistics



    • Estimated age: Late teens to early twenties; most like 19 or 20 years old
    • Approximate Height and Weight: 5'2"; 100 lbs.
    • Distinguishing Characteristics: Possibly mixed with Native American. Black or dark brown hair. Orthopedic surgery had been performed on her right ankle due to instability in the ankle. The procedure, known as a "Watson-Jones" technique, involved drilling two small holes in the ankle bone and winding a tendon through them. She had given birth to at least one child.
    • Dentals: Available. She had extensive dental work, including caps, fillings and crowns. A porcelain crown on one of her front teeth.
    • Clothing: None located

    Case History
    The victim's decomposed body was spotted in Lake Panasoffkee by two hitchhikers crossing the Panasoffkee bridge on February 19, 1971.
    Police were notified and it was quickly determined that the girl had been strangled by a man's size 36 belt, which was still around her throat. Forensic artist Linda Galeener created a composite of the victim. When no one came to claim her body, Galeener was asked to create age-regression drawings, showing what the girl may have looked like at ages 6 and 12. Again, no one identified her. The victims is nicknamed "Little Miss Panasoffkee" and it is quite possible that she was a runaway.

     
  11. rpipergirl

    rpipergirl proud owner Kidmissing

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    I first became aware of this case on unsolved mysteries when the dective who took over the case was on. I have a hard time understanding how a young girl with one possible more children and such a unique orthpedic surgery still has not been identified. I brought her case to the attention of the Doe Network. They researched it and put it up a few months later. http://www.doenetwork.org/
    The detective was the one who nicknamed her "Little miss Panasoffkee"
     
  12. kygal

    kygal Former Member

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  13. rpipergirl

    rpipergirl proud owner Kidmissing

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    Thanks couldn't get it to come up like that.
     
  14. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    This case is certainly an old one. The Unsolved Mysteries episode which featured the case origionally ran back around 1991 or 92.

    There is a thread here on Websleuths Crime Sleuthing Community which has some discussion about the case titled: something on unsolved

    LINK:
    http://www.websleuths.com/forums/showthread.php?t=22997
     
  15. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    Bumping this case up due to recent discussion...
     
  16. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    This case is the first to use a sort of age Re-gression by a forensic artist. They first came up with a sketch of what they believed the girl looked like when she died (early 20's) and then they regressed her face to about 12 and then to about 5 years old.

    The idea of these regression sketches was that perhaps someone might recognize her from years back and help to identify her.

    To date, this case is still unsolved.

    I recall looking into a couple of possibilities:

    - One that she might be a victim of Serial Killer Paul John Knowles,

    - and another that she might have been in Florida to enter Navy Boot Camp (or that she may have gone through that training) in Orlando, Florida. That was where Navy enlisted women went through initial training starting in 1968.
     
  17. SeriouslySearching

    SeriouslySearching Active Member

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    Why do her sketches make her look totally caucasion and her profile states she was possibly part Native American with black or dark hair? I see this as problematic when putting it out for people to identify her. The artist should be more aware of Native American structures of the face and hair when doing these. My niece is part Native American and blonde..but still has facial features which lend to her heritage even if it is only a sixteenth!
     
  18. Angie4b1g

    Angie4b1g New Member

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    Around 1994 my car broke down on 75 and a state trooper happened along and gave us a ride. I saw the sigh for Lake Panasoffkee and said "Oh, didn't I see something on Unsolved Mysteries about a girl being found here?" and the officer said "Yep, she was found right over there" and pointed. So, at least as recently as then they were still talking about her. Hopefully they still are!
     
  19. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    Note: The following summary states that no clothing was located. However, this is not completely accurate, as she was found wearing a pair of panties.

    While Lake Panasoffkee is NW of Orlando, it is actually on the road between Tampa and Ocalla, Florida. It is likely that her killer was traveling that route at the time that he disposed of her body.

    Time of death estimates would have put her murder in Late January or early February 1971.
    -----------------------------
    Unidentified White Female
    The victim was discovered on February 19, 1971 in Lake Panasoffkee, northwest of Orlando, Florida
    Estimated Date of Death: Two to three weeks prior to discovery
    Killed by Homicide by strangulation

    Vital Statistics
    Estimated age: Late teens to early twenties; most like 18 or 23 years old
    Approximate Height and Weight: 5'2"; 100 lbs.
    Distinguishing Characteristics: Possibly mixed with Native American. Black or dark brown hair. Orthopedic surgery had been performed on her right ankle due to instability in the ankle. The procedure, known as a "Watson-Jones" technique, involved drilling two small holes in the ankle bone and winding a tendon through them. The surgery brobably occurred between 1967 and 1970. She had given birth to at least one child.
    Dentals: Available. She had extensive dental work, including caps, fillings and crowns. A porcelain crown on one of her front teeth.
    DNA: Available.
    Clothing: None located

    Case History

    The victim's decomposed body was spotted in Lake Panasoffkee by two hitchhikers crossing the Panasoffkee bridge on February 19, 1971.

    Police were notified and it was quickly determined that the girl had been strangled by a man's size 36 belt, which was still around her throat.

    Forensic artist Linda Galeener created a composite of the victim. When no one came to claim her body, Galeener was asked to create age-regression drawings, showing what the girl may have looked like at ages 6 and 12. Again, no one identified her.

    The victims is nicknamed "Little Miss Panasoffkee" and it is quite possible that she was a runaway.

    Authorities believe she was murdered else where and dumped off the bridge.

    Investigators
    If you have any information about this case please contact:
    Sumter County Sheriff's Office 352-93-0278

    Source Information:
    Unsolved Mysteries episode from 1991
    Daily Sun
    The Doe Network: Case File 470UFFL


    LINK:

    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/470uffl.html
     
  20. monkalup

    monkalup Former member

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    http://www.thevillagesdailysun.com/article...news/news02.txt
    Little miss Panasoffkee



    By DAN SULLIVAN, DAILY SUN

    LAKE PANASOFFKEE — The Lake Panasoffkee bridge is a forgettable span that thousands of travelers cross every day.

    There is little to distinguish this half-mile section of Interstate 75 from the rest of the highway. Thick trees line both sides of the bridge, giving little indication that there is water underneath. Travelers speed past, likely never giving the bridge or the lake beneath it a second thought.

    However nondescript the bridge may be, countless travelers have given it a deadly history that has left a mark on Sumter County. Before the bridge was widened to accommodate the traffic flow, fatalities were a common occurrence.

    But perhaps the best-known fatality on the bridge was not the result of an accident.

    On Feb. 19, 1971, two hitchhikers were walking on the side of the northbound lanes of the bridge when they noticed the body of a young woman floating in the water below. The hitchhikers flagged down a Sumter County sheriff’s deputy, beginning what has now become one of Sumter County’s oldest homicide investigations.

    Thirty-five years later, Sumter County sheriff’s Capt. Gary Brannen thumbs through the contents of a cardboard box marked “Little Miss Panasoffkee,” which contains the entire case file on the still-unidentified woman.




    “We don’t necessarily hold out a whole lot of hope of solving who killed Miss Panasoffkee,” Brannen said, using the name former sheriff James Adams gave the woman in the 1980s. “Our best hope is that we will find out who she was. That’s what we really want to do. She’s somebody’s child. They’re still worried about that child, not knowing what happened to her, and we’d like to put that to rest.”

    The accepted theory

    “Little Miss Panasoffkee” was found with a man’s size 36 leather belt looped twice around her neck, and investigators determined the cause of death was strangulation.

    “It appeared that she had been murdered, maybe in a car as it was being driven down the road, or killed at some point in time, and brought there and dumped out, off the bridge,” Brannen said. “Even then, it was a well-traveled roadway. It very well may have been just somebody passing through that did this and then dumped the body.”

    Forensic anthropologist William Maples of the University of Florida examined the remains after they were exhumed in 1986.

    Maples concluded that the woman was most likely between the ages of 18 and 19 when she died. She could have been as old as 23. “Little Miss Panasoffkee” was Caucasian, but facial features indicate that she may have had some Native American ancestry.

    “This person had been taken care of at some point in time,” Brannen said. He noted that X-rays of the remains revealed that the woman had undergone dental work to include fillings in several teeth. Maples also found evidence that the woman had possibly gone through two pregnancies, giving investigators reason to believe that the woman still has family somewhere.

    “We believe it’s a person who is disenfranchised from her family. They’re not in the family fold, so to speak,” Brannen said.

    “People come to Florida even today. A lot of them come here for the wrong reasons, because they think that everybody in Florida lives on the beach and there’s all sorts of jobs available,” he said. “Really, Florida can be a very treacherous place for people who are not familiar with it and are somewhat naive.”

    Perhaps Maples’ most peculiar find was evidence of orthopedic surgery to the woman’s right ankle.

    “Her right ankle had orthopedic surgery and the technique that was used in it was called the Watson-Jones technique,” Brannen said.

    “We believe that the surgery occurred probably between 1967 and 1970. This was something that we really thought would give us a very good chance of doing something,” he said. “We thought that was a very good clue that we got out at that time in 1986 to the orthopedic community through medical journals and such, to see if possibly somebody had done surgery on someone and then later on that person went missing. Again, that didn’t give us anything, but we’re still hopeful.”

    When the investigation began, many tips investigators received came from people who believed the girl may have been their runaway daughter, Brannen said. In contrast, he said, most of the leads that investigators receive today are from people who believe the woman may be their mother, whom they have not seen for many years.

    Investigators combed missing persons files from around the country, but no match was ever made. Likewise, no strong suspects in the murder have ever been identified.

    “Thirty-five years of work and we don’t have any more of an idea of who she is today than we did in 1971,” Brannen said. “It’s one of those cases that still haunts us.”

    First half
     
  21. monkalup

    monkalup Former member

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    Reasons for hope

    One major obstacle that has hampered the investigation from the beginning was the lack of resources that were available in Sumter County in the early 1970s.

    “Our laboratory resources were not what they are today. The media was not as accessible. The Internet wasn’t there,” Brannen said. “There were all sorts of things back then that hampered an investigation. But they did as best as they could back then with what they had.

    “The good news is that we were able to send the bones recently to the FBI in Washington, and they were able to extract some DNA,” he said. “So if we do come to a good lead to where we believe that this person could be a relative of Miss Panasoffkee, we can take DNA samples and send them to the FBI to see if they’re included in that.”

    In addition to the availability of DNA technology, recent plans to develop a statewide cold case team, utilizing resources from law enforcement agencies from across Florida, have been set in motion. The idea of developing what is known as a Cold Case Review Assessment Team in Florida is something that was spearheaded by Sumter County officials following their work with the cold case team run by the Texas Sheriff’s Association.

    Sumter County sheriff’s officials sought the help of the Texas team during their investigation of the 2000 murder of 72-year-old Margarita Ruiz and her 45-year-old daughter Esperanza Wells in the rural community of Tarrytown, near Webster. After the homicide had been classified as a cold case for six years, investigators earlier this year were able to identify a Wisconsin man as the individual who allegedly shot and stabbed the two women to death.

    Brannen said the Texas team developed a profile of the perpetrator in that case that was revealed to be very accurate once the case was solved.

    “We didn’t solve our case directly as a result of what they told us,” Brannen said, “but when we did solve it, the profile they gave us was 100 percent accurate. They said it was a paranoid schizophrenic in a delusion, at least 25 years old, and that’s what it was.”

    Once the team is started, agencies from all over Florida will be able to bring their own cold cases to the team in Tallahassee, which will meet two to three times a year. The team will examine evidence and report on what they believe needs to be done in order to move the case forward.

    “Sometimes the best thing for one of these cases is a fresh set of eyes,” Brannen said.

    “This cold case assessment team concept is profilers, laboratory people, investigators, forensic crime scene people, a medical examiner who all get together and start listening and round-tabling this case,” he said. “Before you know it, the detectives who make this presentation have two or three pages of notes to go back and work with to breathe life back into a cold case.”

    “There’s that kind of talent here in Florida,” Brannen said. “It’s just a matter of getting that talent all in one place at the same time.”

    Even without the benefit of state assistance, the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office has had exceptional luck in solving cold cases. In addition to the Ruiz-Wells homicide, in the past year alone two other cold homicide cases were solved, the oldest from 1987.

    “From what I understand from larger agencies, they wish they could do three,” Brannen said. “You just never know. We’re hoping that at some point in time somebody is going to come forward.”

    Dan Sullivan is a reporter with the Daily Sun. He can be reached at 753-1119, ext. 9059, or dan.sullivan@thevillagesmedia.com.


    d thought.

    However nondescript the bridge may be, countless travelers have given it a deadly history that has left a mark on Sumter County. Before the bridge was widened to accommodate the traffic flow, fatalities were a common occurrence.

    But perhaps the best-known fatality on the bridge was not the result of an accident.

    On Feb. 19, 1971, two hitchhikers were walking on the side of the northbound lanes of the bridge when they noticed the body of a young woman floating in the water below. The hitchhikers flagged down a Sumter County sheriff’s deputy, beginning what has now become one of Sumter County’s oldest homicide investigations.

    Thirty-five years later, Sumter County sheriff’s Capt. Gary Brannen thumbs through the contents of a cardboard box marked “Little Miss Panasoffkee,” which contains the entire case file on the still-unidentified woman.




    “We don’t necessarily hold out a whole lot of hope of solving who killed Miss Panasoffkee,” Brannen said, using the name former sheriff James Adams gave the woman in the 1980s. “Our best hope is that we will find out who she was. That’s what we really want to do. She’s somebody’s child. They’re still worried about that child, not knowing what happened to her, and we’d like to put that to rest.”

    The accepted theory

    “Little Miss Panasoffkee” was found with a man’s size 36 leather belt looped twice around her neck, and investigators determined the cause of death was strangulation.

    “It appeared that she had been murdered, maybe in a car as it was being driven down the road, or killed at some point in time, and brought there and dumped out, off the bridge,” Brannen said. “Even then, it was a well-traveled roadway. It very well may have been just somebody passing through that did this and then dumped the body.”

    Forensic anthropologist William Maples of the University of Florida examined the remains after they were exhumed in 1986.

    Maples concluded that the woman was most likely between the ages of 18 and 19 when she died. She could have been as old as 23. “Little Miss Panasoffkee” was Caucasian, but facial features indicate that she may have had some Native American ancestry.

    “This person had been taken care of at some point in time,” Brannen said. He noted that X-rays of the remains revealed that the woman had undergone dental work to include fillings in several teeth. Maples also found evidence that the woman had possibly gone through two pregnancies, giving investigators reason to believe that the woman still has family somewhere.

    “We believe it’s a person who is disenfranchised from her family. They’re not in the family fold, so to speak,” Brannen said.

    “People come to Florida even today. A lot of them come here for the wrong reasons, because they think that everybody in Florida lives on the beach and there’s all sorts of jobs available,” he said. “Really, Florida can be a very treacherous place for people who are not familiar with it and are somewhat naive.”

    Perhaps Maples’ most peculiar find was evidence of orthopedic surgery to the woman’s right ankle.

    “Her right ankle had orthopedic surgery and the technique that was used in it was called the Watson-Jones technique,” Brannen said.

    “We believe that the surgery occurred probably between 1967 and 1970. This was something that we really thought would give us a very good chance of doing something,” he said. “We thought that was a very good clue that we got out at that time in 1986 to the orthopedic community through medical journals and such, to see if possibly somebody had done surgery on someone and then later on that person went missing. Again, that didn’t give us anything, but we’re still hopeful.”

    When the investigation began, many tips investigators received came from people who believed the girl may have been their runaway daughter, Brannen said. In contrast, he said, most of the leads that investigators receive today are from people who believe the woman may be their mother, whom they have not seen for many years.

    Investigators combed missing persons files from around the country, but no match was ever made. Likewise, no strong suspects in the murder have ever been identified.

    “Thirty-five years of work and we don’t have any more of an idea of who she is today than we did in 1971,” Brannen said. “It’s one of those cases that still haunts us.”

    Reasons for hope

    One major obstacle that has hampered the investigation from the beginning was the lack of resources that were available in Sumter County in the early 1970s.

    “Our laboratory resources were not what they are today. The media was not as accessible. The Internet wasn’t there,” Brannen said. “There were all sorts of things back then that hampered an investigation. But they did as best as they could back then with what they had.

    “The good news is that we were able to send the bones recently to the FBI in Washington, and they were able to extract some DNA,” he said. “So if we do come to a good lead to where we believe that this person could be a relative of Miss Panasoffkee, we can take DNA samples and send them to the FBI to see if they’re included in that.”

    In addition to the availability of DNA technology, recent plans to develop a statewide cold case team, utilizing resources from law enforcement agencies from across Florida, have been set in motion. The idea of developing what is known as a Cold Case Review Assessment Team in Florida is something that was spearheaded by Sumter County officials following their work with the cold case team run by the Texas Sheriff’s Association.

    Sumter County sheriff’s officials sought the help of the Texas team during their investigation of the 2000 murder of 72-year-old Margarita Ruiz and her 45-year-old daughter Esperanza Wells in the rural community of Tarrytown, near Webster. After the homicide had been classified as a cold case for six years, investigators earlier this year were able to identify a Wisconsin man as the individual who allegedly shot and stabbed the two women to death.

    Brannen said the Texas team developed a profile of the perpetrator in that case that was revealed to be very accurate once the case was solved.

    “We didn’t solve our case directly as a result of what they told us,” Brannen said, “but when we did solve it, the profile they gave us was 100 percent accurate. They said it was a paranoid schizophrenic in a delusion, at least 25 years old, and that’s what it was.”

    Once the team is started, agencies from all over Florida will be able to bring their own cold cases to the team in Tallahassee, which will meet two to three times a year. The team will examine evidence and report on what they believe needs to be done in order to move the case forward.

    “Sometimes the best thing for one of these cases is a fresh set of eyes,” Brannen said.

    “This cold case assessment team concept is profilers, laboratory people, investigators, forensic crime scene people, a medical examiner who all get together and start listening and round-tabling this case,” he said. “Before you know it, the detectives who make this presentation have two or three pages of notes to go back and work with to breathe life back into a cold case.”

    “There’s that kind of talent here in Florida,” Brannen said. “It’s just a matter of getting that talent all in one place at the same time.”

    Even without the benefit of state assistance, the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office has had exceptional luck in solving cold cases. In addition to the Ruiz-Wells homicide, in the past year alone two other cold homicide cases were solved, the oldest from 1987.

    “From what I understand from larger agencies, they wish they could do three,” Brannen said. “You just never know. We’re hoping that at some point in time somebody is going to come forward.”

    Dan Sullivan is a reporter with the Daily Sun. He can be reached at 753-1119, ext. 9059, or dan.sullivan@thevillagesmedia.com.

    Second half
    http://www.thevillagesdailysun.com/articles/2006/10/08/news/news02.txt
     

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