Food and Recipes while under Coronavirus quarantine #3

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anneg

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Sorry, that recipe page is so old and I've scribbled on it making it messy.

The 4 squares of chocolate used to be 1 oz each. Bakers unsweetened chocolate used to be 8 oz per box. However, now the box is only 4 oz so, you need the entire box for this recipe.

I would not substitute chocolate chips unless they are 100% unsweetened cocoa chips. I don't even know if they make those?

The orignal recipe from Cindy said 30 minutes and she had an electric oven. I had a gas oven so 22 minutes was for that particular oven.

Now I have a GE electric oven. I do 27 minutes and a toothpick in the middle usually has a few sticky crumbs on it when it's done. I use a metal pan lined with foil that has cooking spray on it.

Once they cool, lift the foil out of the pan and put it on a solid surface or a cutting board. Then use a disposable plastic knife to cut squares. A metal knife sticks to the gooey part and makes a mess.

They freeze really well. I keep a dish of them in the fridge because I'm in Florida. Everything stays in the fridge and it's hot as Hades here so it's a nice cool treat.


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Thanks for the additional information. Will have to try these!
 

PayrollNerd

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Apparently I had typed up the Fudge Pie recipe at some point, probably for one of the kids. This is easier to read compared to my photo of the recipe. You can use gluten free flour also.

Fudge Pie

In a heavy sauce pan over low heat, melt 4 oz of Bakers Unsweetened Chocolate and 1 cup (2 sticks) of real butter. Blend with a whisk.

Remove from heat and add 4 large eggs. Whisk quickly so eggs don't cook - the batter will be lumpy.

Add in and whisk until well blended:
2 ½ cups of regular sugar,
1 ½ cup of flour (or GF flour such as King Arthur or Bob's Red Mill 1:1)
2 teaspoons vanilla

Line a 9 x 13 pan with foil and spray with cooking spray. Bake at 350 deg for about 27 minutes. A toothpick will be almost clean and the edges will just begin to pull away from the sides.

When cool, cut into small squares as they are very rich. They freeze well.
 

HongKongPhooey

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Yesterday was our 51st anniversary. We had a lovely dinner at Joe Muer in Bloomfield Hills. We started our meal with a split of Champagne and Oysters Rockefeller. I would ordinarily say the appetizer was amazing, but the tiny oysters were overwhelmed with creamed spinach, bacon, gruyere cheese. The dish was more about the trimmings than the oysters. We both would have preferred another appetizer, perhaps the smoked whitefish pate that used to be complimentary.

After finishing our Champagne and appetizer, we ordered a bottle of Pinot Noir to accompany our dinner. DH had a question about the menu before he decided on Bronzino for his entree. The last time he ordered the Mediterranean fish, it was served whole - head and all. Neither of us enjoys this presentation. Lovely waitress told us that many customers didn't care for the whole fish, either, and that now it is filleted and served with a rustic vegetable topping/sauce. DH deemed it wonderful. I had a difficult time deciding between my favorite Dover sole or scallops. The ramps, spring onion, and Morel mushroom accompaniment for the scallops sounded awesome, so I chose that for my entree. The dish featured four enormous scallops and some whole Morel mushrooms on a bed of ramps and spring onions. Delicious! We shared Pommes Frites (fries) with lemon garlic aioli.

Since it was our anniversary, we were presented with a miniature version of Joe Muer's classic coconut cake with a "Happy Anniversary" chocolate garnish. The restaurant had become very busy and noisy, but we lingered so we could finish our wine. We had enjoyed listening to the female vocalist who was, at times, overwhelmed by her accompanist. She did a nice rendering of Etta James' "At Last" (I sang along). We planned to watch a favorite movie when we got home, but after a glass of Champagne and a bottle of Pinot Noir, we decided to watch a couple of episodes of Law & Order: SVU instead because we knew we couldn't stay awake for an entire movie. Enjoy your Sunday.

Happy anniversary Bette. Glad you had a special evening.
 

Yesiamapirate

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We can recite most episodes having seen them so many times :D I checked out the episodes that are on today but don't have it on yet. Do you watch it on Saturdays on ION? (A2 station) DH has gone swimming and will stop at Nino's for something for dinner as we forgot to take anything out of the freezer.
I do watch it on ION as well. I am not sure what I will do if they stop running them. I can literally watch a half dozen at a time. I love the way one episode ends and the next starts immediately. Addictive, lol.
We ended up going to Arbor Brewing in Plymouth tonight. Super yummy Thai Kai Salad with tofu.
 

Auntie Cipation

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One of the first recipes I learned to make when I first started cooking was a James Beard recipe, Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic. Back then, using a whole clove of garlic, let alone 40 cloves, was practically unheard of. Usually garlic powder was used if a recipe called for garlic, and even then it was used very sparingly.


My mom never liked cooking, and her cooking tended toward the very bland, with overcooked veggies and super mild on the spices. I'm no chef but I like stronger flavors, especially garlic. (I now grow my own and in some abundant years I harvest enough to use all year and still have enough to use to plant the following year's crop as well.)

Several years ago I was visiting mom and was making a grocery store run, and she asked me to get some garlic. I was delighted that this suggested she had started using it in her cooking. I came home with a head of garlic and discovered she didn't know what to do with it -- she had meant a jar of garlic powder but hadn't realized she needed to specify. :cool: Ah well... I made sure the head of real garlic didn't go to waste though.
 

IceIce9

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My mom never liked cooking, and her cooking tended toward the very bland, with overcooked veggies and super mild on the spices. I'm no chef but I like stronger flavors, especially garlic. (I now grow my own and in some abundant years I harvest enough to use all year and still have enough to use to plant the following year's crop as well.)

Several years ago I was visiting mom and was making a grocery store run, and she asked me to get some garlic. I was delighted that this suggested she had started using it in her cooking. I came home with a head of garlic and discovered she didn't know what to do with it -- she had meant a jar of garlic powder but hadn't realized she needed to specify. :cool: Ah well... I made sure the head of real garlic didn't go to waste though.
I remember actual heads of garlic weren’t carried by all grocery stores back in the 70s. Like your mom, most people who referred to garlic meant garlic powder. I had to search to find heads of garlic.

Just like back then nearly everyone thought Parmesan cheese came in a tall green can instead of being freshly grated from a block. I can remember being served some store brand or generic Parmesan that was like dust with a very slight cheese flavor.

One item I had read about in a cookbook was parchment paper. Absolutely no one in the city I lived in carried it, most people had never heard of it. I finally found it in a restaurant supply store, and I had to buy a huge industrial-size package. I baked every day and it still took me several years to use all of it.
 

kalvis

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One of the first recipes I learned to make when I first started cooking was a James Beard recipe, Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic. Back then, using a whole clove of garlic, let alone 40 cloves, was practically unheard of. Usually garlic powder was used if a recipe called for garlic, and even then it was used very sparingly.


This sounds good and super simple. In the picture it looks like they used leg quarters. I think I will use thighs. I am not familiar with vermouth (wine). Does anyone have a suggestion of the brand or flavor to use?
 
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