Food and Recipes while under Coronavirus quarantine #4

IceIce9

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The cost of all that convenience has to be astronomical, especially now.

Due to my youngest kiddo's severe food allergies, I had converted a ton of recipes and taught her to make them. So when she ventured out on her own, every single roommate over the past 5 years, was literally shocked at what she made from scratch. It is as if they had no idea where food came from, how to cook it, how to meal plan, etc.
The cost of all that convenience has to be astronomical, especially now.

Due to my youngest kiddo's severe food allergies, I had converted a ton of recipes and taught her to make them. So when she ventured out on her own, every single roommate over the past 5 years, was literally shocked at what she made from scratch. It is as if they had no idea where food came from, how to cook it, how to meal plan, etc.
The cost of all that convenience has to be astronomical, especially now.

Due to my youngest kiddo's severe food allergies, I had converted a ton of recipes and taught her to make them. So when she ventured out on her own, every single roommate over the past 5 years, was literally shocked at what she made from scratch. It is as if they had no idea where food came from, how to cook it, how to meal plan, etc.
The people who order take out all the time are the same ones who complain about not being able to afford gas, utilities, etc.

Once I got in a conversation with a couple of people at work about how much you can save if you bring lunch to work and one person said, “That works for YOU because YOU know how to COOK!!”

I dropped the subject rather than get into a debate, but I could have mentioned that I taught myself to cook, long before you could easily google recipes and watch YouTube videos. I had to borrow library books and purchase cookbooks at garage sales since we didn’t have the internet.

And you don’t have to be an expert chef to prepare simple meals.
 

HongKongPhooey

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The people who order take out all the time are the same ones who complain about not being able to afford gas, utilities, etc.

Once I got in a conversation with a couple of people at work about how much you can save if you bring lunch to work and one person said, “That works for YOU because YOU know how to COOK!!”

I dropped the subject rather than get into a debate, but I could have mentioned that I taught myself to cook, long before you could easily google recipes and watch YouTube videos. I had to borrow library books and purchase cookbooks at garage sales since we didn’t have the internet.

And you don’t have to be an expert chef to prepare simple meals.
Or make a sandwich for lunch! I mean, it’s up to them how they spend their money but the “don’t know how“ is a rubbish excuse. Be honest, say you’re lazy ha.

My son and his gf use you tube a lot for recipes and ideas. They mix home cooking up with the odd takeout. Living in London, they are very spoilt for choice and budgets though.
 

IceIce9

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Or make a sandwich for lunch! I mean, it’s up to them how they spend their money but the “don’t know how“ is a rubbish excuse. Be honest, say you’re lazy ha.

My son and his gf use you tube a lot for recipes and ideas. They mix home cooking up with the odd takeout. Living in London, they are very spoilt for choice and budgets though.
I wish I would have had step-by-step YouTube videos to watch when I was trying to figure out cooking procedures. I made a lot of errors, that’s for sure.

Like the first time I used fresh garlic the recipe called for a clove of garlic, and I thought “clove” was the bulb. Lol. But I had never seen anyone cook with fresh garlic before, and only had an ingredient list to go by.
 

PayrollNerd

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Or make a sandwich for lunch! I mean, it’s up to them how they spend their money but the “don’t know how“ is a rubbish excuse. Be honest, say you’re lazy ha.

My son and his gf use you tube a lot for recipes and ideas. They mix home cooking up with the odd takeout. Living in London, they are very spoilt for choice and budgets though.
My youngest has some app on her phone that she plugs in what the food bank gives us and it spits out recipes of what to make. She's come up with some unique dishes of things I'd never think to make. Kinda like being on that cooking show someone mentioned. LOL!

Now that she's a 30 min drive south, I'll text her the food photos, she plugs them in her app, texts me back what she wants, provided I don't want that particular item. Then I usually get another text telling me what her boyfriend wants, again provided I don't want it. He eats meat and she doesn't. So they are my go to crew for extra food as the food bank asks you to distribute what you don't need.
 

anneg

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Deviled eggs?!? For a cookout in 95 degree weather? No way have we ever fixed that for the Fourth. No potato salad either.
Nothing with mayo in the heat!

Hot dogs/Hamburgers/homemade ice cream is the usual cookout fare.

Actually, using mayo may help keep food fresh! BBM

Mayonnaise Spoilage Myths and Safety: Does Mayo Go Bad?

Commercially made mayonnaise has an undeserved bad reputation as a cause of food spoilage and, in turn, food poisoning. Certain ingredients in commercially made mayo, though, may actually help keep the sandwich spread fresh. It is homemade mayonnaise you need to worry about.

Truth be told, it is usually cross-contamination from the other ingredients (like the chicken in a chicken salad) that cause foodborne illness, not the prepared mayo.

Commercially Made Mayonnaise​

Mayonnaise at its most basic is made of oil, egg yolk, and an acid such as vinegar or lemon juice, but have you ever read the ingredient list on a jar of mayo? Commercially made, jarred mayonnaise is loaded with acid and preservatives that can actually extend the life of the condiment by killing bacteria. In addition, the eggs used in prepared mayonnaise are pasteurized to kill harmful bacteria.

A study published in the Journal of Food Protection found that when commercially made mayonnaise was mixed with contaminated chicken and ham, the mayo slowed—or even stopped—the production of salmonella and staphylococcus bacteria.1 The more mayonnaise that was added, the slower the growth of bacteria became.
 

killarney rose

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Here in Indiana you will usually find deviled eggs, potato salad, and macaroni salad on the menu.

My friends and I usually get together on a patio, deck,or backyard and we keep the cold foods in the refrigerator except when we are serving.

When we go camping we have a couple of portable refrigerators, and I have a cooler that plugs into my car when we go on picnics or to sporting events.
They are staples at our cook outs too. Like you, kept refrigerated and only brought out long enough to serve.
 

IceIce9

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Actually, using mayo may help keep food fresh! BBM

Mayonnaise Spoilage Myths and Safety: Does Mayo Go Bad?

Commercially made mayonnaise has an undeserved bad reputation as a cause of food spoilage and, in turn, food poisoning. Certain ingredients in commercially made mayo, though, may actually help keep the sandwich spread fresh. It is homemade mayonnaise you need to worry about.

Truth be told, it is usually cross-contamination from the other ingredients (like the chicken in a chicken salad) that cause foodborne illness, not the prepared mayo.

Commercially Made Mayonnaise​

Mayonnaise at its most basic is made of oil, egg yolk, and an acid such as vinegar or lemon juice, but have you ever read the ingredient list on a jar of mayo? Commercially made, jarred mayonnaise is loaded with acid and preservatives that can actually extend the life of the condiment by killing bacteria. In addition, the eggs used in prepared mayonnaise are pasteurized to kill harmful bacteria.

A study published in the Journal of Food Protection found that when commercially made mayonnaise was mixed with contaminated chicken and ham, the mayo slowed—or even stopped—the production of salmonella and staphylococcus bacteria.1 The more mayonnaise that was added, the slower the growth of bacteria became.
I read an article that said it was perfectly safe to leave your mayonnaise jar sitting on the counter on in the pantry at room temperature just like ketchup, mustard, and peanut butter.

I keep all of the above in the refrigerator. At my house mayo, ketchup, mustard, and peanut butter are all refrigerated.
 

BetteDavisEyes

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I read an article that said it was perfectly safe to leave your mayonnaise jar sitting on the counter on in the pantry at room temperature just like ketchup, mustard, and peanut butter.

I keep all of the above in the refrigerator. At my house mayo, ketchup, mustard, and peanut butter are all refrigerated.
We refrigerate mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, BBQ sauce, steak sauce (A1), jam/jelly, but not peanut butter - except for natural PB which we seldom buy.
 

anneg

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I read an article that said it was perfectly safe to leave your mayonnaise jar sitting on the counter on in the pantry at room temperature just like ketchup, mustard, and peanut butter.

I keep all of the above in the refrigerator. At my house mayo, ketchup, mustard, and peanut butter are all refrigerated.

Same here. Once they have been opened, they go in the fridge.
 

IceIce9

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We refrigerate mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, BBQ sauce, steak sauce (A1), jam/jelly, but not peanut butter - except for natural PB which we seldom buy.
Did you and your siblings eat the peanut butter right out of the jar? To this day, a jar of PB and a spoon are my besties when I'm stressed :)
We didn’t eat it right out of the jar, our mom would have had a cow. But we did use a serving spoon to put a generous amount of peanut butter into a bowl for each of us.

Our favorite sandwich was flufferwich, made with peanut butter and marshmallow cream.
 

BetteDavisEyes

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Potato salad may just be summer’s official side dish. Invited to practically all gatherings, cool potato salad does its star turn on serving tables everywhere.

We think of potato salad as an all-American dish, but it originated in Spain, where cooks bathed boiled potatoes in olive oil and loaded them up with olives and peppers. Potato salad caught on throughout Europe. In Germany it’s served hot, soused with mouth-puckering vinegar and mustard. The Dutch add colorful peas. The French added creamy mayonnaise.

Considering potato salad’s long and varied history, feel free to change it up and avoid potato-salad fatigue...
 

PayrollNerd

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Potato salad may just be summer’s official side dish. Invited to practically all gatherings, cool potato salad does its star turn on serving tables everywhere.

We think of potato salad as an all-American dish, but it originated in Spain, where cooks bathed boiled potatoes in olive oil and loaded them up with olives and peppers. Potato salad caught on throughout Europe. In Germany it’s served hot, soused with mouth-puckering vinegar and mustard. The Dutch add colorful peas. The French added creamy mayonnaise.

Considering potato salad’s long and varied history, feel free to change it up and avoid potato-salad fatigue...
That is what I do to coleslaw. It is basically raw veggies with dressing. I do use cabbage, carrots but no raw onion just onion powder. I'm not a fan of radicchio unless it is very fine. I added diced yellow squash last time. It turns out good with whatever I have on hand. I also freeze it and then thaw it. You'd never know it was frozen, the taste and texture is the same as fresh.
 

PayrollNerd

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If you like the taste of onion in your slaw or potato salad but not pieces of it, use your little hand held grater and grate some onion into it.
I can't get past the taste of raw onion. It has to be cooked until soft or powdered. I've always been that way too. Being on chemo daily, some foods I used to be able to eat, now taste different, so I can't eat them. But raw onions, that has never changed. It's weird. Ha!
 

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This week Detwilers had Sockeye Salmon on sale. It is thin so I steamed it. I had never steamed fish before. I sprayed the steamer pan so the skin didn’t stick.

I sprinkled salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder on it. Topped it with little pieces of butter and lemon. It has a better flavor than the regular salmon that we had last week.

I made rice and a can of Italian beans. I actually remembered to rinse the rice first this time.

Now I’m going to go get some Romaine for a salad tomorrow. I will put my other piece of salmon on it.
 

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PayrollNerd

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SC Peaches were on sale for $1.29/lb. A great reason to try a new recipe! Gluten Free Peach Bread. I added 2 eggs in error but they look just fine. I’m not putting glaze on them. My youngest will slather it with butter anyway. Ha!

 

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PayrollNerd

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I got the 4 quarts of strawberries cleaned up and packed up. Took the trimmings out to the compost bin. Checked the garden and got 4 Roma tomatoes yesterday and 2 today. I checked the carrots and one is decent size and one was tiny. So I left the rest in. I have 2 little grape / cherry tomatoes so far.

My friend made zucchini lasagna and gave me a few pieces. It was so good. I don't know how I'll grill the zucchini yet. I really don't want to get my big grill set up to do just that. She has this cast iron grill that sits over 2 burners of her glass top stove. That seems like a big investment to do one recipe. So I'm going to look online for suggestions. I picked up the ingredients today so I'm looking forward to making this later this week.

 

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