Forgotten Reports about Long Island Human Remains Found

Discussion in 'LISK Unidentified Victims' started by Seaslug44, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. madamx

    madamx Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    Likes Received:
    3,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Tiffany Dixon disappeared from Brooklyn in 1991
     
    Patience and pillywiggin like this.
  2. madamx

    madamx Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    Likes Received:
    3,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I seriously think this is my favorite thread on here. It's packed with so many unidentified or missing people from just Long Island alone it boggles my mind. I keep coming back to cross reference.!!

    I would love to Create a thread like this for the other boroughs. I am sure many of the people that end up out there are from one of the boroughs.

    I wonder how many of the unidentified people written about on this thread were identified and how many of these missing ones were found?
     
  3. madamx

    madamx Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    Likes Received:
    3,062
    Trophy Points:
    113
    How can they tell there are no signs of foul play when the head the ribcage and the legs are missing?
     
    Patience likes this.
  4. NJEverCurious

    NJEverCurious Active Member

    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    73
    Trophy Points:
    28
    If they had the complete skeleton, there may be signs of foul play. If they found only a few bones, it's possible that those pieces showed no signs of foul play. Maybe the article could have been worded better.
     
    madamx likes this.
  5. sharebear

    sharebear New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I also think that cases in this state need to be linked to the same type of cases in nearby states. The method of killing and the way the bodies are disposed of could have links to other cases not just NJ but PA or other nearby states. Law enforcement really needs a data base that can collate these distinct facts in each case. Cold cases could possibly be solved quicker.
     
    madamx likes this.
  6. NJEverCurious

    NJEverCurious Active Member

    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    73
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Check out the Murder Accountability Project. It's not very user-friendly IMO, but I think it heads in the direction you're suggesting.
     
    Patience and madamx like this.
  7. sharebear

    sharebear New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    3
    No obvious signs of foul play missing body parts? Really it's just a torso
     
  8. sharebear

    sharebear New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Russian mob sex or drug trafficking rings. Criminals look at crime shows too. They can see that dismembered bodies are harder to identify and to show a cause of actual death.
     
  9. sharebear

    sharebear New Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I
    It would also be helpful if the DNA from families of the missing in the state and across the country was taken in each missing person reports. That may already be done regularly but is that shared across state lines. That may speed up the identification of the deceased person. And even an international sharing of information because sex trafficking of the missing is global. The original 10 ate all known sex workers who could have been targets of a larger sex trafficker not just a random serial killer.
     
  10. Patience

    Patience Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,662
    Likes Received:
    120
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Not wanting to get off topic on the unidentified human remains thread too much but I want to say that the VICAP and VICLAS will be effective only if it is mandatory to utilize them in every state and province in North America. Only then will these clusters of serial killings be solved in my opinion. This means funding is required.
    The FBI's Flawed ViCAP Database - The Atlantic
    Three decades after the FBI launched a revolutionary system to catch repeat offenders, it remains largely unused.
     

Share This Page



  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice