GBC's life in prison

Discussion in 'Allison Baden-Clay of Australia' started by Kimster, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. Kimster

    Kimster Former Member

    Messages:
    58,147
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This is for sleuthing GBC's life in prison. What's it like for him now? Keep an eye on any movement. I don't know if Australia has anything online where you can see if prisoners are transferred? That's a common practice among our members in US cases.
     
  2. Loading...


  3. Moggill2

    Moggill2 New Member

    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  4. wakeskate

    wakeskate Just the facts, ma'am

    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I missed the whole sentencing discussion.
    I understand he got life with (potential) parole after 15 years.

    Does life mean life or 20 years?
    I have always thought a life sentence was 20 year
     
  5. Fuskier

    Fuskier Active Member

    Messages:
    4,338
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Hi Wakeskate,

    I was unable to follow consistently yesterday as well, and tried to catch up at various points; BUT I did catch the verdict and sentencing. The sentencing was brief and delivered immediately following the Victim Impact Statements from Allison's family members. [It was reported that this had been agreed upon by both DT and PT beforehand]. The Judge then addressed the convicted murderer and sentenced him to life in prison. The sentence for murder in QLD is life in prison which made it easy for the Judge to deliver. Hope this is helpful. Suggest you click on Alioop's posts and you'll find more about this. All the best for now.
     
  6. Aliwonders

    Aliwonders New Member

    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  7. Amee

    Amee Active Member

    Messages:
    6,197
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
  8. marlywings

    marlywings Former Member

    Messages:
    12,283
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Not too long after his arrest Qld sentencing laws were changed. I don't know why they continue to refer to it as a life sentence. I don't think there's too many at all who are locked away for life. Prior to the change, it was 15yrs before parole could be looked at. Some time around June 2012, it was upped to 20yrs.

    Because the murder was prior to the changes it means GBC will only have to do the 15yrs before seeking parole. But going by the judges words yesterday, he may have a hard time trying for parole.
     
  9. Mumma Bear

    Mumma Bear New Member

    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Clever move by the judge in his sentencing remarks. By setting parole at the minimum it won't be a reason for an appeal, but his comments certainly meant "and when I say '15' I mean 'at least 20' ".

    :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail: :jail:
     
  10. wakeskate

    wakeskate Just the facts, ma'am

    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks marlywings.

    I did some googling and it seems QLD (and one other state) that life is natural life.
    It's not like he hits 20 years and he is free. There is a mandatory (non-parole) of 15 years and we heard from the judge.
    I did see he recommended it be strongly evaluated when it comes around though.

    At least in 15 years time his daughters will be old enough to make their own decisions and not be influenced by this psychopath. (youngest will be 23 I think)
    Hopefully they haven't been too influenced by their fathers manipulative personality and find themselves a decent partner that wont take the same advantage of them as he did with Alison.
     
  11. L_B

    L_B Member

    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    So just say the parole board turn him down, is he in prison until he dies?
     
  12. wakeskate

    wakeskate Just the facts, ma'am

    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That is how I am reading it. It's natural life.
    However the docoment I found that said how it was across the states also said the average for a life sentence in Queensland was 15 years 9 months.
    It was written in 1989 though.

    http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/0/A/F/{0AFC75B4-D8EE-42D4-83A5-2A4EDB4ABD66}ti19.pdf

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_imprisonment_in_Australia

    Sorry, I misquoted the info above. The life sentence is mandatory for murder in Queensland and SA, not the definition for "life imprisonment"
     
  13. marlywings

    marlywings Former Member

    Messages:
    12,283
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
    He'll keep trying for parole even if his first attempts fail. I doubt he'll be in prison for life.

    Some the likes of Cowan & Bayley will have pretty much zero chance of ever being released I think , but others do get parole.
     
  14. cluciano63

    cluciano63 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    37,936
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ugh that is way too short. I don't understand why some countries are so forgiving of murderers. Even if he does not get out at fifteen years, it too too soon to be considered, Imo.
     
  15. Amee

    Amee Active Member

    Messages:
    6,197
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    You have no criminal history, but you are definitely not of good character," Justice Byrne said.

    "You are given to lies and public deception, so much so that whatever you may say on any application for parole, 15 years or more hence, will need to be assessed with considerable scepticism.

    "The community, acting through the court, denounces your lethal violence."

    Baden-Clay will serve a minimum of 15 years behind bars under Queensland law.

    Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/que...n-badenclay-20140715-ztdon.html#ixzz37c99onfC
     
  16. wakeskate

    wakeskate Just the facts, ma'am

    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I am sure he will keep trying every chance he gets.
    Assuming he does nothing wrong in jail, one would expect him to be out sometime between the 15-20 year mark (minus the time he has already served)

    Given he has no prior criminal history (except being a real estate agent :) ), one would assume after sitting in jail for 15+ years you would never do it again.
    Doesn't mean he shouldn't be doing the full time for his crime.

    Admission of the act and remorse to Alison's family and his kids would be the first step before any thought of parole should be considered.
     
  17. marlywings

    marlywings Former Member

    Messages:
    12,283
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
    One of the worst, from outside of Oz, that sticks in my memory is the sentence Elisa Baker received in USA for dismembering her little Aussie step daughter Zahra Baker. She only received 18 years!!!

    http://murderpedia.org/female.B/b/baker-elisa.htm
     
  18. JK673

    JK673 New Member

    Messages:
    702
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would probably say actually admitting it would be essential to get parole even looked at
     
  19. Crime and punishment

    Crime and punishment New Member

    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    On the news tonight it was reported that Gerard spent his first night sobbing in his cell. His one phone call was to his parents- he sobbed and pleaded his innocence. Is he that deluded? Is there a psychological condition that would make him actually believe his own lies?
     
  20. wakeskate

    wakeskate Just the facts, ma'am

    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    He has to maintain the illusion of innocence until all appeals are exhausted.
    His only real source of help from the outside world would now be his parents.

    Sounds like anyone who ever helped him in the past he owes money to, so there would be no one else coming to his aid.
     
  21. Tigerlily75

    Tigerlily75 Member

    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Yes, this! He's been convicted of murder, therefore he is guilty. If he applies for parole in 15 years he'll need to have shown remorse and rehabilitation to have even a remote chance. If he's still claiming innocence - parole will be denied. That's my understanding.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice