German feral child Peter the Wild Boy had Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, expert opines

Discussion in 'Bizarre and Off-Beat News' started by wfgodot, Mar 21, 2011.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Peter the Wild Boy's condition revealed 200 years after his death

    Feral German child who was kept as a pet in George I's court
    had Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, research into portrait suggests


    the rest of this hugely interesting story, including the deciphering of the clues
    leading to the opinion that Peter had Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome, at Guardian link above
     
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  3. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    The child savage kept as a pet by King George

    more on the story - an excerpt from historian Lucy Worsley's book - at Daily Mail link above
     
  4. Kat

    Kat Kind words do not cost much

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    I'm curious if there would be any remains left to test for genetic disorder at Peter's grave.

    I think this is a very interesting theory wfgodot and thank you for bringing this and creating a thread.
     
  5. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    I've always been interested in the notion of feral children; there were several interesting cases in the 18th century, along with Peter's. That of Marie-Angélique Memmie Le Blanc was especially so - she succeeded in learning to read and write.
     
  6. tapu

    tapu Pretty scary.

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    Interesting. There's a certain amount of interest and research in that phenomenon in my field, Linguistics. The main thrust of it has to do with whether language has to be acquired by some certain age in order to qualify as a true human (symbolic) language. I think Victor d'Avignon is cited in a lot of these studies. My specialty wasn't too close to that so I don't know a lot about it.

    Thanks for the interesting reads!
     
  7. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    A most interesting - and harrowing - contemporary case of what might be termed a feral child was that of a girl called, in the literature, Genie. Russ Rymer's two-part New Yorker article in 1992, documenting the extreme deprivation (from language, most importantly) inflicted upon Genie by her parents, was hugely powerful, and reading of the extent of the damage done her difficult to endure. The essays are combined in Rymer's book "Genie: Escape from a Silent Childhood."
     

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