UK Jack the Ripper London 1888, East End, in and around Whitechapel District UNSOLVED

Discussion in 'Serial Killers' started by wfgodot, May 15, 2011.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Interesting material in its own right - the Yard continues to deny access to Jack the Ripper papers 123 years later.

    WS's most-current Ripper thread's last post was in 2009; let this one serve, then, as a good posting-ground for amateur Ripperologists of all stripes.

    Police make bizarre legal battle to keep files secret so Victorian sources keep their 'confidentiality'
     
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  3. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    For non-Ripper experts, "supergrasses" is British slang for police informants.

    (I had to look it up.)
     
  4. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Today's NY Post hops aboard the tabloid train with a look at the case by Robert House, whose new book seeks to re-invigorate the candidacy of Aaron Kozminski as Jack:

    They don't know Jack
    Movies love to portray him as mysterious, glamorous — but what if Jack the Ripper was simply a lunatic?
     
  5. Quiche

    Quiche New Member

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    Interesting that they're still protective of the investigation-- it immediately makes me wonder if the perp was royalty of some kind. Who else would merit protection of their reputation 120+ years later?
     
  6. LadyL

    LadyL Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking exactly the same thing.

    I hope I get to see these files in my lifetime. I think the Ripper was my first foray into crime mysteries.
     
  7. Kat

    Kat Kind words do not cost much

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    What are the laws in that country governing older investigations like this please? TIA for anyone who knows! :)
     
  8. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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  9. not_my_kids

    not_my_kids New Member

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    I really do think that they must be protecting someone, and I'm not often for the royal family conspiracy theories, but this time...it's a case well over a century old. Who would still need protection at this point in time? Not the Ripper himself certainly, but his family? very likely, in my eyes.

    ETA: Although there is the possibility that Scotland Yard is only protecting themselves, not wanting the world to see unknown amounts of screw-uppery...that's always possible. No one wants to be a laughing stock.
     
  10. Mira

    Mira Country Girl

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    possibly if the case was solved, it would hurt tourism? i would imagine tours of whitechapel still make a bundle.
    or...brits are very consious of privacy, i know, i married one LOL
     
  11. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    To use a term in the news of late, this would appear to be the mother of all
    super injunctions, protecting those questioned even though they are dead.
     
  12. Melanie

    Melanie Inactive

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    I married one too! DH always thought it was a doctor, or someone who was highly protected (ie, royal). Eventually "Jack" was sent away or killed by someone who knew what he was doing.

    My other thought it was a (British bobby) or constable - who, again, was found out, killed, or sent away.

    Keeping the records hidden only hightens my suspicions. Dang hope he doesn't come from my family tree (The Gunpowder Plot - the Throckmortons, the Throgmortons) out of Coughton Court.

    Very intriguing!

    Mel
     
  13. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    Good point. My first thought was the same as others: they must be protecting a royal.

    But then I thought how bureaucracies go to extremes in protecting themselves. The official who said releasing info even after a century might have a chilling effect on witness candor may just be that sort of bureaucrat.
     
  14. reportertype

    reportertype Dogs are awesome!

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    I couldn't help but laugh. My first thought was: "Everyone's going to think it's a royal for sure now!"
     
  15. MaryLiz

    MaryLiz New Member

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    BBM...

    They do...I was in London one New Years Eve several years ago and we decided to take the Jack the Ripper tour through the East End and Whitechapel area. The bus was packed! It was very eerie at the end of the tour to be in one of the pubs that existed back then. I remember sitting at the bar and drinking malt whisky, looking at all the grisly crime scene photos! It was definitely a memorable New Years Eve..lol.

    As far as the crime itself, I've long believed it was a member of the royal family who was involved. There's just no other reason why they would keep those records secret all this time. JMO.
     
  16. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    I too love the "Royal involvement" angle, and the Masonic angle. But I just don't see them as solutions.
     
  17. kline

    kline New Member

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    If I had to go with any of the known suspects I would still pick Montague Druitt who many of contemporary investigators felt was the Ripper.
    He loaded his pockets with rocks and took a long walk off a short pier straight into the Thames in late 1888 shortly after the horrific butchery of Mary Kelly.
    But I wouldnt be at all surprised and suspect the Ripper was a nobody who is lost to history. Even though folks have lots of fun contemplating the 'High Profile ' suspects.
     
  18. STANDREID

    STANDREID A slacker when slacker wasn't cool

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    Monty was my top 20 years ago and is still in there with W. Hardiman, G. Chapman and W. Bury.
     
  19. HMSHood

    HMSHood Admiral-Class Battlecruiser

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    It's 120 years later and all parties are dead. Time to release the files.
     
  20. badhorsie

    badhorsie Mouth operational, brain elsewhere...

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    I am no expert on JTR but I have always wondered about Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence and Avondale.

    It is said that he was not in London at the time of the murders but they would say that wouldn't they?

    Also, in the UK, most documents over 100yrs old are in the public domain. I find it fascinating that they won't release these old documents. Something is up...
     
  21. Quiche

    Quiche New Member

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    We'll see is they're released when the Queen passes on... that's my suspicion. He would have been her grand uncle. I was unaware of the controversy surrounding him, but I immediately thought it was a royal who engendered the sensitivities of the Queen. jmo
     

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