Japanese biker fails to notice missing leg

Discussion in 'Bizarre and Off-Beat News' started by ceeaura, Aug 14, 2007.

  1. ceeaura

    ceeaura Former Member

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    http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/08/14/japan.biker.reut/index.html

    TOKYO, Japan (Reuters) -- A Japanese biker failed to notice his leg had been severed below the knee when he hit a safety barrier, and rode on for 2 km (1.2 miles), leaving a friend to pick up the missing limb.
    The 54-year-old office worker was out on his motorcycle with a group of friends in the city of Hamamatsu, west of Tokyo, on Monday, when he was unable to negotiate a curve in the road and bumped into the central barrier, the Mainichi Shimbun said.
    He felt excruciating pain, but did not notice that his right leg was missing until he stopped at the next junction, the paper quoted local police as saying.
    The man and his leg were taken to hospital, but the limb had been crushed in the collision, the paper
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    :eek::eek::eek: All I can say ouch.His adrenaline must have been pumping not to notice.Yikes!
     
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  3. SeriouslySearching

    SeriouslySearching Active Member

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    OMG! How could you not notice you cut off your leg?!?!
     
  4. GlitchWizard

    GlitchWizard Reprobate

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    I remember last year or so, a woman and a man were in a truck and didn't know where the woman's arm was.

    That still puzzles me, too.
     
  5. jantel74

    jantel74 Member

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    How bizarre and ouch!
     
  6. Taximom

    Taximom Former Member

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    One of my neighbors just had his leg amputated due to a motorcycle/SUV accident. I'm aware of some type of excruciating pain associated with an amputation but can't remember it right now. I wonder if that's what this fellow in the news felt. You think your limb is there, but it's not.

    I can't even imagine this! It's a wonder he didn't bleed out.
     
  7. montana_16

    montana_16 Active Member

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    Well, I'm a dummy. My first thought was, how did he keep pedalling? I thought it was a bicycle!:doh:
     
  8. kgeaux

    kgeaux New Member

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    This guy must be made of the same stuff samurai and shogun were made of.
     
  9. BethInAK

    BethInAK New Member

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    I guess he had some sort of adrenaline reaction.

    And BTW I thought bicyclist too.
     
  10. hipmamajen

    hipmamajen I love the friends I have gathered together on thi

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    My guess is that he was in shock. I have been in shock a couple of times, and both times I did things that made no sense to me afterwards.

    It seems like it would be hard to balance without one of your legs, if you weren't used to it being that way.
     
  11. dingo

    dingo Former Member

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    Didnt he notice the blood trail?
     
  12. dark_shadows

    dark_shadows Former Member

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    My very sweet Taximom,:blowkiss:
    A friend of mine lost an arm. He had "Phantom pain". Please see this link, it explains alot......Phantom limbs


    All of my Love and Respect to you,
    dark_shadows
     
  13. southcitymom

    southcitymom New Member

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    Thanks for the link, my friend! :blowkiss: Lots of interesting information there and I would kind of like to try some of those experiments.

    My Dutch uncle, who passed away several years ago, had both of his legs amputated above the knee and lived like that for 10+ years. He constantly had excrutiating pain in his missing parts.
     
  14. dark_shadows

    dark_shadows Former Member

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    Dear Southcitymom,:blowkiss:

    Hello my friend! The article is very interesting indeed. I would like to try the experiments also.

    All of my Love and Respect to you,
    dark_shadows
     
  15. Taximom

    Taximom Former Member

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    Maybe not if he was going forward on his bike? Can you imagine being the car behind him trying to flag him down? :eek:

    I guess you don't need your feet for anything when you ride a motorcycle.
     
  16. Taximom

    Taximom Former Member

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    THAT'S what it's called. I guess he's going through that now, and not at the time of the accident.

    Thank you so much, DS!! You are so thoughtful. :blowkiss:
     
  17. pedinurse

    pedinurse Former Member

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    That has to be horrible. I could never imagine. I find that sort of thing oddly fascinating...
    I was looking up some stuff on that a while back, and they are now doing something like "nerve mapping." I am not sure that was what it was called, but that is what I think of it as. Basically, our nerve tracks trasmit messages from different parts of the body... like, we have arm pain when we have heart attacks because those nerves are used to transmit messages by both body parts, and the nerves are "used" to transmitting pain impulses from the arm (not dying heart muscle). Anyway, they are looking into "mapping" each person and the person's nerve impuses, and where the person can basically scratch or massage on a completely separate part of the body (a hand, elbow, whatever) to help decrease or satisfy the phantom pain / itch in the foot, arm, leg, whatever. I thought that was super interesting.
     
  18. Taximom

    Taximom Former Member

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    DS, I absolutely love websites like this. The section about mirror neurons caught my attention.
    http://www.youramazingbrain.org/brainbody/dancers.htm

    I wonder if those neurons are limited in autistic and speech-delayed children? If our brains read other's reactions and then mirror them back, it just might be dysfunctional in the brain of someone with autism, etc. (I'm sure there's other medical conditions that are affected, but that one is dear to my heart.)

    Hmm. I need to do some more reading. Thanks again!
    :blowkiss:

    P.S. I just read the last sentence on that page and it's about autism, so I'm glad someone is working on this!!!!
     
  19. dark_shadows

    dark_shadows Former Member

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    My dear sweet Taximom,:blowkiss:
    I posted an article about Amanda Baggs on another thread awhile ago. She lives a short distance from my town. I was awe struck when I watched her video.
    Here is a link;
    CNN interview with Amanda
    There is so much that we do not understand about Autism. If you cannot get the links to her video, please let me know and I will post them.


    All of my Love and Respect to you,
    dark_shadows
     
  20. dark_shadows

    dark_shadows Former Member

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    So much Love and Respect to you Taximom. My friend was a POW. Out of all of his unit that were POW'S, he was the only one who lived. I hold a great amount of Respect for him. I cannot even imagine the tourment and pain that he endures each and every day.


    Love and Respect to you,
    dark_shadows
     

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