John Ramsey: Knots, Knowledge, and Know-how.

Cottonstar

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John Ramsey specialized in Jury-Rigging at Michigan State.

Evidence: USN OCS SEACHEST 801 BOOK (11PP)

John Ramsey, while in college, specialized in the knowledge of knots, and more importantly, the know-how, or procedural knowledge of handling ropes, cord, numerous nautical knots, and how to employ them in dire emergency and makeshift situations.

While building Ramsey’s suspectological profile, I was able to obtain a copy of an evidentiary item collected in the search warrant on December 26, 1996. USN OCS 801 BOOK (11PP), is John Ramsey’s United States Navy, Officer Candidate School class graduation yearbook. Ramsey graduated OCS and earned his commission in 1968. Along with John’s photo in his dress uniform reads:

RAMSEY, JOHN B. OKEMOS, MICHIGAN, MICHIGAN STATE..SPECIALIZED IN JURY-RIGGING IN COLLEGE ENGINEERING. AT OCS, HE HAS PATCHED TOGETHER A BLUE-GIG MACHINE.

Jury-Rig has nothing to do with courtrooms or jurors. It is a nautical term used in sailing and ships. When a ship’s mast is destroyed, an emergency makeshift mast must be made for the ship to sail again. This process includes the tying and rigging of rope using various nautical knots that each serve a purpose in supporting the functioning of the makeshift mast. This YouTube video shows the process of a jury-rigging a mast on a yacht.

From Wikipedia: The jury mast knot or masthead knot is traditionally used for jury-rigging a temporary mast on a sailboat or ship after the original one has been lost. The knot is placed at the top of a new mast with the mast projecting through the center of the knot. The loops of the knot are then used as anchor points for makeshift stays and shrouds. Usually small blocks of wood are affixed to, or a groove cut in, the new mast to prevent the knot from sliding downwards.

How and why is all of this relevant to the JonBenet Ramsey Case?

We know that cord/rope and knots are part of the murder weapon.

On more than occasion in Ramsey's official police interviews, John has distanced himself from his knowledge and procedural know-how of knots. From 2001, while under oath in Wolf v. Ramsey case:

HOFFMAN: Did any of your basic training involve — and I don't know if they still do this — learning various nautical knots?

RAMSEY: No.


HOFFMAN: Do you sail at all?

RAMSEY: I used to.

HOFFMAN: Did you pilot your own sailboat or did you —

RAMSEY: Yes.

HOFFMAN: — have someone —

RAMSEY: Yes.

HOFFMAN: — do it for you?

RAMSEY: No.

HOFFMAN: Did you receive any training in sailing?

RAMSEY: No.

HOFFMAN: Are you familiar with the various knots involved in sailing?

RAMSEY: I am really not. I should be, but I am not.

HOFFMAN: All right. So how would you generally moor your craft?

RAMSEY: I would tie it up on a cleat.

HOFFMAN: Was there any sort of knot that you used that you could identify that has a technical term?

RAMSEY: I don't know the technical term for it.

HOFFMAN: Have you had occasion to be able to look at the knot that was tied around the so-called paintbrush garotte?

RAMSEY: I have not.

HOFFMAN: Is there any reason why you haven't?

RAMSEY: It is very painful for me, Mr. Hoffman.

HOFFMAN: I understand that. But with your nautical training, do you think that you could in any way be able to identify the sort of knot?

RAMSEY: No.

Why would John Ramsey downplay his experience and knowledge of knots? What purpose would that serve?

This wasn’t just a long ago skill learned and crafted by John in his college and Navy days, and never utilized again. Ramsey has owned at least three different boats/sailing vessels in his lifetime. (Miss America, Grand Seasons, and TenOClock)There are numerous photos of John and his family enjoying themselves on their various vessels. In the summer of the year JonBenet died, John Ramsey led his crew in the yearly Port Huron to Mackinac Island Yacht race. John Ramsey was a competitive sailor with his own ship at the time of JonBenét’s death.

“I went sailing with them on Lake Charlevoix where, even though they were six and nine, both kids had jobs on the boat. Both were treated with respect and showed respect back to their parents.” Sailing was another family activity that was important to both John and Patsy.”

Mike Bynum

The Ramseys are attempting to rewrite history and change the evidence, 25 years after the death of JonBenét. However, the evidence such as this, will always tie the Ramseys to the death of JonBenét Ramsey.
 

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John Ramsey specialized in Jury-Rigging at Michigan State.

Evidence: USN OCS SEACHEST 801 BOOK (11PP)

John Ramsey, while in college, specialized in the knowledge of knots, and more importantly, the know-how, or procedural knowledge of handling ropes, cord, numerous nautical knots, and how to employ them in dire emergency and makeshift situations.

While building Ramsey’s suspectological profile, I was able to obtain a copy of an evidentiary item collected in the search warrant on December 26, 1996. USN OCS 801 BOOK (11PP), is John Ramsey’s United States Navy, Officer Candidate School class graduation yearbook. Ramsey graduated OCS and earned his commission in 1968. Along with John’s photo in his dress uniform reads:

RAMSEY, JOHN B. OKEMOS, MICHIGAN, MICHIGAN STATE..SPECIALIZED IN JURY-RIGGING IN COLLEGE ENGINEERING. AT OCS, HE HAS PATCHED TOGETHER A BLUE-GIG MACHINE.

Jury-Rig has nothing to do with courtrooms or jurors. It is a nautical term used in sailing and ships. When a ship’s mast is destroyed, an emergency makeshift mast must be made for the ship to sail again. This process includes the tying and rigging of rope using various nautical knots that each serve a purpose in supporting the functioning of the makeshift mast. This YouTube video shows the process of a jury-rigging a mast on a yacht.

From Wikipedia: The jury mast knot or masthead knot is traditionally used for jury-rigging a temporary mast on a sailboat or ship after the original one has been lost. The knot is placed at the top of a new mast with the mast projecting through the center of the knot. The loops of the knot are then used as anchor points for makeshift stays and shrouds. Usually small blocks of wood are affixed to, or a groove cut in, the new mast to prevent the knot from sliding downwards.

How and why is all of this relevant to the JonBenet Ramsey Case?

We know that cord/rope and knots are part of the murder weapon.

On more than occasion in Ramsey's official police interviews, John has distanced himself from his knowledge and procedural know-how of knots. From 2001, while under oath in Wolf v. Ramsey case:

HOFFMAN: Did any of your basic training involve — and I don't know if they still do this — learning various nautical knots?

RAMSEY: No.


HOFFMAN: Do you sail at all?

RAMSEY: I used to.

HOFFMAN: Did you pilot your own sailboat or did you —

RAMSEY: Yes.

HOFFMAN: — have someone —

RAMSEY: Yes.

HOFFMAN: — do it for you?

RAMSEY: No.

HOFFMAN: Did you receive any training in sailing?

RAMSEY: No.

HOFFMAN: Are you familiar with the various knots involved in sailing?

RAMSEY: I am really not. I should be, but I am not.

HOFFMAN: All right. So how would you generally moor your craft?

RAMSEY: I would tie it up on a cleat.

HOFFMAN: Was there any sort of knot that you used that you could identify that has a technical term?

RAMSEY: I don't know the technical term for it.

HOFFMAN: Have you had occasion to be able to look at the knot that was tied around the so-called paintbrush garotte?

RAMSEY: I have not.

HOFFMAN: Is there any reason why you haven't?

RAMSEY: It is very painful for me, Mr. Hoffman.

HOFFMAN: I understand that. But with your nautical training, do you think that you could in any way be able to identify the sort of knot?

RAMSEY: No.

Why would John Ramsey downplay his experience and knowledge of knots? What purpose would that serve?

This wasn’t just a long ago skill learned and crafted by John in his college and Navy days, and never utilized again. Ramsey has owned at least three different boats/sailing vessels in his lifetime. (Miss America, Grand Seasons, and TenOClock)There are numerous photos of John and his family enjoying themselves on their various vessels. In the summer of the year JonBenet died, John Ramsey led his crew in the yearly Port Huron to Mackinac Island Yacht race. John Ramsey was a competitive sailor with his own ship at the time of JonBenét’s death.

“I went sailing with them on Lake Charlevoix where, even though they were six and nine, both kids had jobs on the boat. Both were treated with respect and showed respect back to their parents.” Sailing was another family activity that was important to both John and Patsy.”

Mike Bynum

The Ramseys are attempting to rewrite history and change the evidence, 25 years after the death of JonBenét. However, the evidence such as this, will always tie the Ramseys to the death of JonBenét Ramsey.

Interesting. Michael Kane, btw, indicated that the police knot expert, John Van Tassel, determined that the knots were simple rather than sophisticated.

Maybe the garrote knot was intended to look elaborate and sophisticated, but actually wasn't.
 
John Ramsey specialized in Jury-Rigging at Michigan State.

Evidence: USN OCS SEACHEST 801 BOOK (11PP)

John Ramsey, while in college, specialized in the knowledge of knots, and more importantly, the know-how, or procedural knowledge of handling ropes, cord, numerous nautical knots, and how to employ them in dire emergency and makeshift situations.

While building Ramsey’s suspectological profile, I was able to obtain a copy of an evidentiary item collected in the search warrant on December 26, 1996. USN OCS 801 BOOK (11PP), is John Ramsey’s United States Navy, Officer Candidate School class graduation yearbook. Ramsey graduated OCS and earned his commission in 1968. Along with John’s photo in his dress uniform reads:

RAMSEY, JOHN B. OKEMOS, MICHIGAN, MICHIGAN STATE..SPECIALIZED IN JURY-RIGGING IN COLLEGE ENGINEERING. AT OCS, HE HAS PATCHED TOGETHER A BLUE-GIG MACHINE.

Jury-Rig has nothing to do with courtrooms or jurors. It is a nautical term used in sailing and ships. When a ship’s mast is destroyed, an emergency makeshift mast must be made for the ship to sail again. This process includes the tying and rigging of rope using various nautical knots that each serve a purpose in supporting the functioning of the makeshift mast. This YouTube video shows the process of a jury-rigging a mast on a yacht.

From Wikipedia: The jury mast knot or masthead knot is traditionally used for jury-rigging a temporary mast on a sailboat or ship after the original one has been lost. The knot is placed at the top of a new mast with the mast projecting through the center of the knot. The loops of the knot are then used as anchor points for makeshift stays and shrouds. Usually small blocks of wood are affixed to, or a groove cut in, the new mast to prevent the knot from sliding downwards.

How and why is all of this relevant to the JonBenet Ramsey Case?

We know that cord/rope and knots are part of the murder weapon.

On more than occasion in Ramsey's official police interviews, John has distanced himself from his knowledge and procedural know-how of knots. From 2001, while under oath in Wolf v. Ramsey case:

HOFFMAN: Did any of your basic training involve — and I don't know if they still do this — learning various nautical knots?

RAMSEY: No.


HOFFMAN: Do you sail at all?

RAMSEY: I used to.

HOFFMAN: Did you pilot your own sailboat or did you —

RAMSEY: Yes.

HOFFMAN: — have someone —

RAMSEY: Yes.

HOFFMAN: — do it for you?

RAMSEY: No.

HOFFMAN: Did you receive any training in sailing?

RAMSEY: No.

HOFFMAN: Are you familiar with the various knots involved in sailing?

RAMSEY: I am really not. I should be, but I am not.

HOFFMAN: All right. So how would you generally moor your craft?

RAMSEY: I would tie it up on a cleat.

HOFFMAN: Was there any sort of knot that you used that you could identify that has a technical term?

RAMSEY: I don't know the technical term for it.

HOFFMAN: Have you had occasion to be able to look at the knot that was tied around the so-called paintbrush garotte?

RAMSEY: I have not.

HOFFMAN: Is there any reason why you haven't?

RAMSEY: It is very painful for me, Mr. Hoffman.

HOFFMAN: I understand that. But with your nautical training, do you think that you could in any way be able to identify the sort of knot?

RAMSEY: No.

Why would John Ramsey downplay his experience and knowledge of knots? What purpose would that serve?

This wasn’t just a long ago skill learned and crafted by John in his college and Navy days, and never utilized again. Ramsey has owned at least three different boats/sailing vessels in his lifetime. (Miss America, Grand Seasons, and TenOClock)There are numerous photos of John and his family enjoying themselves on their various vessels. In the summer of the year JonBenet died, John Ramsey led his crew in the yearly Port Huron to Mackinac Island Yacht race. John Ramsey was a competitive sailor with his own ship at the time of JonBenét’s death.

“I went sailing with them on Lake Charlevoix where, even though they were six and nine, both kids had jobs on the boat. Both were treated with respect and showed respect back to their parents.” Sailing was another family activity that was important to both John and Patsy.”

Mike Bynum

The Ramseys are attempting to rewrite history and change the evidence, 25 years after the death of JonBenét. However, the evidence such as this, will always tie the Ramseys to the death of JonBenét Ramsey.

Cottonstar,
Could be important in linking JR to the crime-scene. So how can JR's initmate knowledge of knots and Patsy's fibers embedded into the ligature knotting be explained?

Do you reckon JR would be savvy enough to minimize the apparent expertise applied in fashioning the ligature/paintbrush device?

I understand that JR had passed on his pleasure of sailing to Burke along with some learning in the construction of sailing knots?

Would JR have been given any miltary instruction in lethal knot construction while in service?

Why would JR select ligature asphyxiation over other methods?

.
 
Cottonstar,
Could be important in linking JR to the crime-scene. So how can JR's initmate knowledge of knots and Patsy's fibers embedded into the ligature knotting be explained?

Do you reckon JR would be savvy enough to minimize the apparent expertise applied in fashioning the ligature/paintbrush device?

I understand that JR had passed on his pleasure of sailing to Burke along with some learning in the construction of sailing knots?

Would JR have been given any miltary instruction in lethal knot construction while in service?

Why would JR select ligature asphyxiation over other methods?

.
I don’t believe the knots at the death scene were originally tied by John Ramsey.
 
I don’t believe the knots at the death scene were originally tied by John Ramsey.

Cottonstar,
Where do you reckon the death scene was located?

Patsy, with her fibers embedded into the ligature knotting, is prime suspect for fashioning the ligature?

Do you think John, loosened the knotting and added the paintbrush?

.
 
From the above interview with JR, when asked if familiar with knots: "I'm really (k)not. I should be, but I'm (k)not."
 
From the above interview with JR, when asked if familiar with knots: "I'm really (k)not. I should be, but I'm (k)not."

proust20,
Whatever John's role in the case, he would have been fully aware to distance himself from any obvious links to the crime-scene.

Yet, everyone knows he is a competent sailor and skilled in the fashioning of knots.

Unlike Patsy whose interest in knots possibly extended to those involving hair-ties?

Although at points in the case John does appear to inject himself into the case, e.g. his explanations for the various artifacts scattered about the basement, along with his claim that Patsy was fully unaware where the Partially Unwrapped Gifts were stored.

I interpret this as suggesting JR was responsible for creating the wine-cellar crime-scene and dumping the relevant objects into it. Along with postmortem claims that they were always there?

It could be the case is JDI with JR acting as the Master Manipulator, including deliberately redressing JonBenet in clothing designed to deflect attention?

Why is JR still popping up, like a Jack In The Box, in JonBenet documentaries that are of little subtance?

Are they dollar earners or is there another motive?

Patently JR has ran out of suspects, he might run out of time too?

.
 
My father was a Navy vet, and part and parcel was pride in knots and everyone knew it. I doubt John would knowingly draw attention to himself by featuring a relatively rare knot in the murder package.
 
Basement
No
Perhaps

CS

OK, so in your view Burke tied the original garrote knot because neither Patsy nor John did. And then John came along and did...something to it maybe?

How is John's alleged knot-tying expertise connected to this? That garrote knot looks rather shambolic to me.
 
The ligature knots are not particularly complicated. When discussing the knots, it should be noted that the same cord was entwined around JB's limbs; but, it had no restraining capabilities, as it was too loose. An almost decorative touch, like trimming the tree? This loose cord would have been added after the asphyxiation as part of the 'kidnap' scenario. The effect of the ligature was so brutal that it brings into question whether something of such intensity could be just staging. The sadism of the killer is a prominent feature. This goes to the motive? Had the paintbrush been used for SA before? The brush may not be makeshift, but have symbolic meaning? People can relieve themselves of guilt, if they hide in plain sight. They scatter a trail, and if LE doesn't follow it; well, that's not their fault. The Rs were consistently arrogant with BPD - "Go back to the drawing board."

Fashioning the ligature adds to the timeline. Or during the 40 min gap? Manual strangulation would have been more efficient. The ligature is unnecessary. The killer wanted to avoid touching their family member? Yet the strangulation exhibits extreme violence. Along with the final assault, staged or not, possibly with the brush. Not surprisingly, it doesn't add up. The roll of cord was in the basement already near the art supplies? Cut with the Swiss Army knife?

Ramnesia began once BPD arrived at the CS. JR professing ignorance of knots is significant. Was the cord bought for the boat in MI? He could afford top legal advice. IDK to every question.
 
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The ligature knots are not particularly complicated. When discussing the knots, it should be noted that the same cord was entwined around JB's limbs; but, it had no restraining capabilities, as it was too loose. An almost decorative touch, like trimming the tree? This loose cord would have been added after the asphyxiation as part of the 'kidnap' scenario. The effect of the ligature was so brutal that it brings into question whether something of such intensity could be just staging. The sadism of the killer is a prominent feature. This goes to the motive? Had the paintbrush been used for SA before? The brush may not be makeshift, but have symbolic meaning? People can relieve themselves of guilt, if they hide in plain sight. They scatter a trail, and if LE doesn't follow it; well, that's not their fault. The Rs were consistently arrogant with BPD - "Go back to the drawing board."

Fashioning the ligature adds to the timeline. Or during the 40 min gap? Manual strangulation would have been more efficient. The ligature is unnecessary. The killer wanted to avoid touching their family member? Yet the strangulation exhibits extreme violence. Doesn't add up. The roll of cord was in the basement already near the art supplies? Cut with the Swiss Army knife?

Ramnesia began once BPD arrived at the CS. JR professing ignorance of knots is significant. Was the cord bought for the boat in MI? He could afford top legal advice. IDK to every question.

I doubt if that device was used for the actual strangulation. Nylon is stretchy and there were 17 useless inches of cord, I believe, between the stick and her neck. Steve Thomas says the cord was like a soft flat shoelace. That 17 inches doesn't include the length of cord looped around the stick. Some of the force used to pull the stick would merely go to compressing those loops against themselves. Keeping in mind that the business end of the device was more like a noose than a garrote, the direction of force would be upward on the single strand of cord and would lift the head/body up more than compress the neck--even if the perpetrator is kneeling on her back and I don't think there's evidence of that.

It would be more efficient to just loop that cord (or some other) around the neck, and once or twice around your hands, then pull in opposite directions more or less parallel to the ground. The "garrote" could be added later as window dressing.
 
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The device "acted as a noose rather than a true garrote. The point where the rope became a noose was at the back of the neck, which suggested to some that JonBenét was lying facedown when the ligature was tied." (Schiller 1999, S. 661)

"Investigators would also enlist the aid of a knot expert, John Van Tassel of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. He would eventually determine that the slip knots used in the wrist and neck ligatures were of standard fare. The end of the cord wrapped around the remains of the paintbrush were observed to be concentric loops and ended in a simple hitch that secured the knot in place. Again, there was nothing particularly fancy about the knots suggesting that a skilled perpetrator had been responsible for tying them." (Kolar 2013, S. 65f.)

Michael Kane: "If Mary [Lacy] has reached this conclusion [that the knots were "sophisticated"] she clearly has not reviewed her own file [...] I don't know where this came from that these were sophisticated knots. I don't know that anybody had the opportunity to untie those knots who was an expert in knots, but the Police Department had somebody who fit that category, and that was not the opinion of that person, who said these were very simple knots."

Beckner: "We had a knot expert look at them and none of them were anything complex. Many people probably could have tied the knots."

Looks like JR was trying to hide in plain site.
 
The device "acted as a noose rather than a true garrote. The point where the rope became a noose was at the back of the neck, which suggested to some that JonBenét was lying facedown when the ligature was tied." (Schiller 1999, S. 661)

"Investigators would also enlist the aid of a knot expert, John Van Tassel of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. He would eventually determine that the slip knots used in the wrist and neck ligatures were of standard fare. The end of the cord wrapped around the remains of the paintbrush were observed to be concentric loops and ended in a simple hitch that secured the knot in place. Again, there was nothing particularly fancy about the knots suggesting that a skilled perpetrator had been responsible for tying them." (Kolar 2013, S. 65f.)

Michael Kane: "If Mary [Lacy] has reached this conclusion [that the knots were "sophisticated"] she clearly has not reviewed her own file [...] I don't know where this came from that these were sophisticated knots. I don't know that anybody had the opportunity to untie those knots who was an expert in knots, but the Police Department had somebody who fit that category, and that was not the opinion of that person, who said these were very simple knots."

Beckner: "We had a knot expert look at them and none of them were anything complex. Many people probably could have tied the knots."

Looks like JR was trying to hide in plain site.

Rain on my Parade,
Beckner: "We had a knot expert look at them and none of them were anything complex. Many people probably could have tied the knots."
I reckon Beckner is right.

Yet the proviso is that it was obviously not needed to kill JonBenet, so IMO its all staging, nothing more.

You could argue that JonBenet's assailant simply refined the crime-appearance by adding the paintbrush handle attached to the ligature via knotting.

Yet, just consider the process leading up to this, i.e. fetching the paintbrush, deciding to break it two, then crucially putting one piece back in the paint-tote (why?), and removing another piece from the crime-scene, can this process not be described as staging?

The staging patently worked as folks today think that JonBenet was assaulted and asphyxiated in the basement wine-cellar.

.
 
Yet, just consider the process leading up to this, i.e. fetching the paintbrush, deciding to break it two, then crucially putting one piece back in the paint-tote (why?), and removing another piece from the crime-scene, can this process not be described as staging?

The staging patently worked as folks today think that JonBenet was assaulted and asphyxiated in the basement wine-cellar.

UKGuy,
The fiber evidence found in the paint tray was also found in the ligature. There were also shards of wood from the broken paintbrush in the carpet there. It could all be staging as far as the paintbrush goes except JB was alive when SA with the paintbrush.
I wonder if the oversized pajamas weren’t found in JB bedroom we could consider all actions other then the consumption of pineapple and the head bash happened in the basement?
 
OK, so in your view Burke tied the original garrote knot because neither Patsy nor John did. And then John came along and did...something to it maybe?

How is John's alleged knot-tying expertise connected to this? That garrote knot looks rather shambolic to me.
Shambolic! I agree.

For generations the Ramsey family have passed down their traditions and skills in scouting, sailing, airplanes and aeronautics. John’s father, James D. Ramsey, was a scout during his youth, and became a distinguished pilot who flew numerous missions in World War II. After the war, Ramsey would continue his passion for flight and help advance the age of commercial airline travel as the Director of the Michigan Aeronautics Commission. He passed down his skills as a pilot to his sons, John and Jeff, and taught them everything about airplanes and how to fly. Long after John had left home for college and time in the Navy, James Ramsey stayed active in the Boy Scouts of America, as a sponsor and advisor for Explorer Post 317 in Michigan. In 1971, Ramsey planned and piloted a flight on which he presented an advanced Air Explorer Scout his distinguished Eagle award at 10,000 feet in the air. Following in his father’s footsteps, John would also become an advanced scout, pilot, and would go on to own multiple airplanes in his lifetime. In TOSOS, John reminisces about going out on his father’s boat and fishing with him on Lake Mecosta. John seemed to love boating and sailing on the water as much as he enjoyed flying in the air. As I mentioned before, John owned at least three sailing vessels throughout his life.

John’s first son, John Andrew Ramsey, didn’t fall far from the knots, knowledge, and know-how tree. JAR was in the scouting program for a long time during his adolescent and high-school years. He became a high-ranking advanced Eagle Scout. The climbing/outdoor rope and rucksack found in his room was his. John’s second daughter, Melinda also followed the tradition of the Ramsey family and became an Explorer Scout.

The culmination of all this knowledge, exptertise, and experience in these specific activities that require handling and tying of ropes into various scouting and nautical knots was funneled down to Burke Ramsey. Like all of the Ramsey men before him, he developed an enthusiasm and passion for scouting, sailing, and all things airplane. At the age of nine, almost ten, Burke had already become an advanced scout for his age. And why wouldn’t he be? He had excellent teachers with lifetimes of experience surrounding him. At the time of the murder, Burke had already been in the Boy Scouting program for over three years. He stood out by winning the Best All-around Camper award at Camp McSauba in his Charlevoix summer of 95’. This is the same year Burke took sailing lessons each day while at Summer Hill. He owned multiple pocketknives, including a Swiss Army Knife engraved with his name. In his 1998 interview with police, he rattled off the name of every tool on his knives, including “ this little hook thing that you tie better knots with.” Burke wore the best hiking shoes/boots at the time- Hi-Tec’s, complete with a compass on the shoelace to enhance his skills in scouting. In addition to the airplane wallpaper plastered on the walls of his bedroom, he showed off one of his many model airplanes by hanging it from the ceiling. This was the same model airplane that had white camping cord, tied in knots, hanging from it- shown in the crime scene photographs taken during the multiple-day processing of the house for evidence.

This is who Burke was. This is who the Ramseys were. The Ramseys didn’t approach these activities and develop these skill-sets, in a leisurely anecdotal hearsay, sort of way- but rather, a woven into the fabric of the family, sort of way. Given that a broken wooden stick, wood shavings, Hi-Tec shoeprint, white nylon camping cord, various knots, and a Swiss Army Knife are all found at ground zero of the crime scene, it's all important, it all matters.

"That one has a big knife, small knife, saw, corkscrew, screwdriver, flat head screwdriver, toothpick and tweezers. And I think that's it. And then I have another one that has a saw, scissors, it's got this little hook thing that you tie knots better with." - Burke Ramsey's 1998 interview with police.

“It reminds me of the days when my brother and I scrambled to get our gear into the small cedar strip fishing boat to go fishing with Dad on Lake Mecosta. And I think of the mornings when John Andrew was young and beside me preparing for takeoff into the rising sun in our small airplane.” - TOSOS.
 
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Shambolic! I agree.

For generations the Ramsey family have passed down their traditions and skills in scouting, sailing, airplanes and aeronautics. John’s father, James D. Ramsey, was a scout during his youth, and became a distinguished pilot who flew numerous missions in World War II. After the war, Ramsey would continue his passion for flight and help advance the age of commercial airline travel as the Director of the Michigan Aeronautics Commission. He passed down his skills as a pilot to his sons, John and Jeff, and taught them everything about airplanes and how to fly. Long after John had left home for college and time in the Navy, James Ramsey stayed active in the Boy Scouts of America, as a sponsor and advisor for Explorer Post 317 in Michigan. In 1971, Ramsey planned and piloted a flight on which he presented an advanced Air Explorer Scout his distinguished Eagle award at 10,000 feet in the air. Following in his father’s footsteps, John would also become an advanced scout, pilot, and would go on to own multiple airplanes in his lifetime. In TOSOS, John reminisces about going out on his father’s boat and fishing with him on Lake Mecosta. John seemed to love boating and sailing on the water as much as he enjoyed flying in the air. As I mentioned before, John owned at least three sailing vessels throughout his life.

John’s first son, John Andrew Ramsey, didn’t fall far from the knots, knowledge, and know-how tree. JAR was in the scouting program for a long time during his adolescent and high-school years. He became a high-ranking advanced Eagle Scout. The climbing/outdoor rope and rucksack found in his room was his. John’s second daughter, Melinda also followed the tradition of the Ramsey family and became an Explorer Scout.

The culmination of all this knowledge, exptertise, and experience in these specific activities that require handling and tying of ropes into various scouting and nautical knots was funneled down to Burke Ramsey. Like all of the Ramsey men before him, he developed an enthusiasm and passion for scouting, sailing, and all things airplane. At the age of nine, almost ten, Burke had already become an advanced scout for his age. And why wouldn’t he be? He had excellent teachers with lifetimes of experience surrounding him. At the time of the murder, Burke had already been in the Boy Scouting program for over three years. He stood out by winning the Best All-around Camper award at Camp McSauba in his Charlevoix summer of 95’. This is the same year Burke took sailing lessons each day while at Summer Hill. He owned multiple pocketknives, including a Swiss Army Knife engraved with his name. In his 1998 interview with police, he rattled off the name of every tool on his knives, including “ this little hook thing that you tie better knots with.” Burke wore the best hiking shoes/boots at the time- Hi-Tec’s, complete with a compass on the shoelace to enhance his skills in scouting. In addition to the airplane wallpaper plastered on the walls of his bedroom, he showed off one of his many model airplanes by hanging it from the ceiling. This was the same model airplane that had white camping cord, tied in knots, hanging from it- shown in the crime scene photographs taken during the multiple-day processing of the house for evidence.

This is who Burke was. This is who the Ramseys were. The Ramseys didn’t approach these activities and develop these skill-sets, in a leisurely anecdotal hearsay, sort of way- but rather, a woven into the fabric of the family, sort of way. Given that a broken wooden stick, wood shavings, Hi-Tec shoeprint, white nylon camping cord, various knots, and a Swiss Army Knife are all found at ground zero of the crime scene, it's all important, it all matters.

"That one has a big knife, small knife, saw, corkscrew, screwdriver, flat head screwdriver, toothpick and tweezers. And I think that's it. And then I have another one that has a saw, scissors, it's got this little hook thing that you tie knots better with." - Burke Ramsey's 1998 interview with police.

“It reminds me of the days when my brother and I scrambled to get our gear into the small cedar strip fishing boat to go fishing with Dad on Lake Mecosta. And I think of the mornings when John Andrew was young and beside me preparing for takeoff into the rising sun in our small airplane.” - TOSOS.

Cottonstar,
This is who Burke was. This is who the Ramseys were. The Ramseys didn’t approach these activities and develop these skill-sets, in a leisurely anecdotal hearsay, sort of way- but rather, a woven into the fabric of the family, sort of way. Given that a broken wooden stick, wood shavings, Hi-Tec shoeprint, white nylon camping cord, various knots, and a Swiss Army Knife are all found at ground zero of the crime scene, it's all important, it all matters.
it only matters if you can link the various pieces of evidence to someone, within some timeframe.

According to Kolar BR has offered an explanation for his Hi-Tec shoeprint, i.e. he visited the wine-cellar Christmas Day?

LPG tells us that BR regularly dropped shavings about the house.

white nylon camping cord
Do you have a reference for this attribution?

The knots as an example of sophisticated knowledge do not appear to be substantiated, i.e. Beckner.

So the one unexplained item is the Swiss Army Knife.

Curiously, given your account of John's backstory he would be adept in the use of that knife type.

Then again, if Patsy came across the knife while fetching some other item she could have used it to help construct the paintbrush/ligature device?

I reckon the question is: did BR stage an amateur crime-scene down in the basement, or is it all the work of the parents?

Did the parents deliberately redress JonBenet in Burke's long johns and Patsy's niece's size-12 Bloomingdale's underwear?

i.e. was it all ad-hoc staging fabricated on a wing and a prayer?

An interesting case over here in the UK has just gone public with a 14-year old boy being charged with allegedly causing the death of a 5-year old boy.

The BBC are reporting the case along with the identities of those being involved.

Logan Mwangi: Boy, 14, in court accused of murdering five-year-old
Logan Mwangi: Boy, 14, in court accused of murdering five-year-old
John Cole, 39, has been charged with murder.

He and Logan's mother, Angharad Williamson, 30, both from Sarn, have been charged with perverting the course of justice.

So a parallel with the JonBenet case might be that the parents may, allegedly, be willing to do whatever it takes to prevent another family member from facing prosecution?

.
 
When considering the presence of PR's fiber evidence, the question if she undressed or not after arriving home arises. If she didn't change, there is not much need of an explanation for the fibers, as she wore the same clothes for a remarkable 12 hour marathon. Obviously, if she changed into nightclothes, at some point, PR would have to get out of bed and redress. Did she redress immediately upon rising? Alternately, did she awake or was woken, go around the house and return for her Christmas attire, with JR sleeping throughout any commotion in the room?

I don't see why any nocturnal activities of PR couldn't have been done in nightclothes. Writing the RN did not require the right Holiday jacket. Her redressing would not add much to the timeline. However, the timeline would be linked to whatever caused her to put on the party outfit again. Frankly, I have difficulty in figuring what would compel her to redress for the asphyxiation, which is a usual assumption behind the fiber evidence. If there were a suddenly urgent situation, why take the time to change back into regular clothes? Suggestions welcome.
 
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Shambolic! I agree.

For generations the Ramsey family have passed down their traditions and skills in scouting, sailing, airplanes and aeronautics. John’s father, James D. Ramsey, was a scout during his youth, and became a distinguished pilot who flew numerous missions in World War II. After the war, Ramsey would continue his passion for flight and help advance the age of commercial airline travel as the Director of the Michigan Aeronautics Commission. He passed down his skills as a pilot to his sons, John and Jeff, and taught them everything about airplanes and how to fly. Long after John had left home for college and time in the Navy, James Ramsey stayed active in the Boy Scouts of America, as a sponsor and advisor for Explorer Post 317 in Michigan. In 1971, Ramsey planned and piloted a flight on which he presented an advanced Air Explorer Scout his distinguished Eagle award at 10,000 feet in the air. Following in his father’s footsteps, John would also become an advanced scout, pilot, and would go on to own multiple airplanes in his lifetime. In TOSOS, John reminisces about going out on his father’s boat and fishing with him on Lake Mecosta. John seemed to love boating and sailing on the water as much as he enjoyed flying in the air. As I mentioned before, John owned at least three sailing vessels throughout his life.

John’s first son, John Andrew Ramsey, didn’t fall far from the knots, knowledge, and know-how tree. JAR was in the scouting program for a long time during his adolescent and high-school years. He became a high-ranking advanced Eagle Scout. The climbing/outdoor rope and rucksack found in his room was his. John’s second daughter, Melinda also followed the tradition of the Ramsey family and became an Explorer Scout.

The culmination of all this knowledge, exptertise, and experience in these specific activities that require handling and tying of ropes into various scouting and nautical knots was funneled down to Burke Ramsey. Like all of the Ramsey men before him, he developed an enthusiasm and passion for scouting, sailing, and all things airplane. At the age of nine, almost ten, Burke had already become an advanced scout for his age. And why wouldn’t he be? He had excellent teachers with lifetimes of experience surrounding him. At the time of the murder, Burke had already been in the Boy Scouting program for over three years. He stood out by winning the Best All-around Camper award at Camp McSauba in his Charlevoix summer of 95’. This is the same year Burke took sailing lessons each day while at Summer Hill. He owned multiple pocketknives, including a Swiss Army Knife engraved with his name. In his 1998 interview with police, he rattled off the name of every tool on his knives, including “ this little hook thing that you tie better knots with.” Burke wore the best hiking shoes/boots at the time- Hi-Tec’s, complete with a compass on the shoelace to enhance his skills in scouting. In addition to the airplane wallpaper plastered on the walls of his bedroom, he showed off one of his many model airplanes by hanging it from the ceiling. This was the same model airplane that had white camping cord, tied in knots, hanging from it- shown in the crime scene photographs taken during the multiple-day processing of the house for evidence.

This is who Burke was. This is who the Ramseys were. The Ramseys didn’t approach these activities and develop these skill-sets, in a leisurely anecdotal hearsay, sort of way- but rather, a woven into the fabric of the family, sort of way. Given that a broken wooden stick, wood shavings, Hi-Tec shoeprint, white nylon camping cord, various knots, and a Swiss Army Knife are all found at ground zero of the crime scene, it's all important, it all matters.

"That one has a big knife, small knife, saw, corkscrew, screwdriver, flat head screwdriver, toothpick and tweezers. And I think that's it. And then I have another one that has a saw, scissors, it's got this little hook thing that you tie knots better with." - Burke Ramsey's 1998 interview with police.

“It reminds me of the days when my brother and I scrambled to get our gear into the small cedar strip fishing boat to go fishing with Dad on Lake Mecosta. And I think of the mornings when John Andrew was young and beside me preparing for takeoff into the rising sun in our small airplane.” - TOSOS.

There's a video of Felix Immler using "the little hook thing" on an SAK. The hook, if it's the same one, might be useful in certain situations.

I made a Ramsey-type garrote thing of my own. I didn't really try to approximate the knot. I just made sure it had one business end like the Ramsey deal. I wrapped the shoelace many times over a dowel and passed the working end under one of the loops. I then attached that end to a dumbbell and lifted it. The cord had tension up to the point where it passed over the dowel. The vast majority of dowel cord was relaxed, not tight, and not contributing anything at all. Of course, this might just be due to my non-existent knot-tying ability. How would the Ramsey garrote behave? I think this is key to deciding whether the knot was made by someone who more or less knew what he/she was doing or someone who only had an idea what a sophisticated knot for this purpose would look like.

One could approximate the Ramsey garrote by using a 10lb-ish weight as a head with a cylinder of neckish diameter. I don't think the garrote knot is particularly important here, a tight square knot would do it. But the loop at the "neck" end, where the cord passes through up to the dowel, would be important. With a substantial layer of Model Magic around the "neck," one could see if the furrow made in the MM by the garrote matches, paying particular attention to the back of the "neck." If it doesn't match, then the garrote wasn't used for the strangulation and is just window dressing.

I'm not going to do it. I think I'm done with this wretched topic.
 
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