Lessons in Crime Detection

Discussion in 'Darlie Routier' started by Goody, Sep 5, 2005.

  1. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    Excerpts taken from the book "Silent Witness" by Mark Fuhrman. He has excellent detective skills and these are some that he shares. Good book, by the way; an easy read. Next post are my views on how these points apply to Darlie's case.

    "My experience is that the recollections of family members who discover loved ones dead or injured are usually very accurate. They remember vivid details that remain with them for the rest of their lives." (page 186)

    "He was the first one to see her. Instead of being vivid and accurate, his recollections are vague, contradictory, and sometimes nonsensical. The story changes every time he tells it."

    "Michael's only consistent recollection from the early morning hours of February 25, 1990, is the sound of Terri falling to the floor, which he consistently describes as a thud. Why does he remember this detail, while everything else is vauge or contradictory? Whether or not he committed a criminal act, I believe Michael witnessed Terri falling. And he has never forgotten that." (page 186-187)

    "When a detective team is working a case, they will often sit down, over coffee in the morning or beer at night, and think outside of the box, tossing around ideas that sometimes sound ridiculous, sometimes are ridiculous, and sometimes wind up solving the case." (page 192)

    "If you are someone who talks to yourself while engaged in an important task, you will understand. This is just a detective talking out loud, in the hope that by hearing his own words, the facts that he already knows backward and forward, will fit into some pattern that resembles the truth as it occurred. (page 192)

    "Cops might have more technologically advanced investigative resources at their disposal, but criminals haven't changed. The suspects we are chasing today are no different from the ones my training officers were chasing thirty years ago. They do the same stupid things, lie about the same obvious evidence, and usually talk themselves into jail more often than not. Suspects make mistakes, and they all think they will get away with the crime." (page 203)

    "When people who have the most control over and around the victim begin to change simple and innocent statements, or for some reason can't remember a simple fact, such as the time when they discovered their wife, they become a suspect."

    Note: pages 204, 205 have many more interesting guides on crime solving you might want to read.

    "A suspect who does not have a criminal history has one significant disadvantage. He does not know how to act, either as a grieving husband or as a murderer."(page 205)

    "At the same as the suspect puts on his act, he also has to be careful when describing his actions and observations. Most other suspects do not want to place themselves at the crime scene. This suspect lives there. Most other suspects don't want to have any connection to the victim. This suspect was married to her." (page 205)

    "But suspects often try to answer questions they don't or couldn't know the answers to in order to throw off suspicion. In their guilty minds, they need to account for everything. They think the more they tell the detective, the more the dumb cop is likely to be satisfied, and they will escape suspicion. (page 207)

    "The husband's actions were consistent with the behavior of middle-class suspects in domestic homicides. Call someone early to establish urgency, panic, and stop the time. Have them assist at the scene, which is supposedly pristine. Fail to assist the victim." (page 208)

    "Detective bureaus all over the country have cases like this. Some of them are eventually solved; many are not. Domestic homicides are usually solved by quick identification of the suspect and his or her immediate commitment to the story. (page 208)
     
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  3. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    <<<"My experience is that the recollections of family members who discover loved ones dead or injured are usually very accurate. They remember vivid details that remain with them for the rest of their lives." (page 186)>>>>

    Of course, Darlie provides no detail at all. Even allowing the TA excuse, the portion of the event in which she was awake and alert on the telephone, etc, she is still evasive.

    <<< "He was the first one to see her. Instead of being vivid and accurate, his recollections are vague, contradictory, and sometimes nonsensical. The story changes every time he tells it.">>>

    The struggling with the intruder in the kitchen is quickly changed to her being attacked as she slept on the couch, and she moved his position each time she told the story, from her head area to her feet to the family room/kitchen threshold. Her very first sight of him should have created a lifelong image in her mind that she would not ever forget. Instead it is all rather fuzzy and she is inconsistent. Her story is in a continual edit mode as she was still making changes even after her trial in a document called "In Her Own Words".

    <<<"Michael's only consistent recollection from the early morning hours of February 25, 1990, is the sound of Terri falling to the floor, which he consistently describes as a thud. Why does he remember this detail, while everything else is vauge or contradictory? Whether or not he committed a criminal act, I believe Michael witnessed Terri falling. And he has never forgotten that." (page 186-187)>>>

    I have always felt this was true about Darin and that breaking wine glass. He remembers it so clearly because he was in the room when it broke. Darin has always been consistent about hearing that glass break, even after police proved he couldn't have heard it or any other noise coming from the downstairs that night. Why does he hold onto the wine glass breaking? Because it is so vivid in his recollection. The only way it could be that vivid was if he were awake when it fell and he was right there to hear it.

    <<<"When a detective team is working a case, they will often sit down, over coffee in the morning or beer at night, and think outside of the box, tossing around ideas that sometimes sound ridiculous, sometimes are ridiculous, and sometimes wind up solving the case." (page 192)>>>>

    This is sooooooooo Goody. LOL! You see, folks, ridiculous is sometimes a good thing. It exorcises the truth, at least sometimes.

    <<<"If you are someone who talks to yourself while engaged in an important task, you will understand. This is just a detective talking out loud, in the hope that by hearing his own words, the facts that he already knows backward and forward, will fit into some pattern that resembles the truth as it occurred. (page 192)>>>>

    This is Goody, too. I can't tell you how many times someone has walked into my cubicle, office, work area and said, "Goody, are you talking to yourself?" Talking to myself keeps me focused. Sometimes it keeps me entertained.

    <<<"Cops might have more technologically advanced investigative resources at their disposal, but criminals haven't changed. The suspects we are chasing today are no different from the ones my training officers were chasing thirty years ago. They do the same stupid things, lie about the same obvious evidence, and usually talk themselves into jail more often than not. Suspects make mistakes, and they all think they will get away with the crime." (page 203)>>>>

    This is a good lesson, I think. Never think someone wouldn't do something because anyone might and most probably do. Arguments that Darlie was too smart or too dumb to do this or that are not productive. (I've been guilty of this myself.) Evidence is supposed lead us. That makes us followers.

    <<<"When people who the most control over and around the victim begin to change simple and innocent statements, or for some reason can't remember a simple fact, such as the time when they discovered their wife, they become a suspect." (page 204)>>>>>

    Walla! The RPD are redeemed!

    <<<Note: pages 204, 205 have many more interesting guides on crime solving you might want to read.

    "A suspect who does not have a criminal history has one significant disadvantage. He does not know how to act, either as a grieving husband or as a murderer." (page 205) >>>

    The silly string party, flirting with police, jumping around the front yard like you have just been freed from the jaws of a whale....all show inappropriate behavior and Darlie's disconnection to the situation. Darin's too.

    <<<"At the same time as the suspect puts on his act, he also has to be careful when describing his actions and observations. Most other suspects do not want to place themselves at the crime scene. This suspect lives there. Most other suspects don't want to have any connection to the victim. This suspect was married to her." (page 205)

    Exactly why Darlie had to come up with a story that had her unable to remember, so she couldn't get trapped by the detail. She thought saying she was asleep throughout the attack would do it, then follow that up with the I don't know what happened excuse, let the authorities figure it out, would work. Later her attys turned to the traumatic amnesia because they knew no one would believe she slept thru it.

    <<<"But suspects often try to answer questions they don't or couldn't know the answers to in order to throw off suspicion. In their guilty minds, they need to account for everything. They think the more they tell the detective, the more the dumb cop is likely to be satisfied, and they will escape suspicion. (page 207)>>>>

    Darlie telling right away that she picked up the knife, pointing out that maybe the police could have gotten prints if she hadn't, then repeating that story to anyone who would listen at the hospital shows her doing exactly what Mark points out above. An innocent Darin then becomes her witness and allie

    <<<"The husband's actions were consistent with the behavior of middle-class suspects in domestic homicides. Call someone early to establish urgency, panic, and stop the time. Have them assist at the scene, which is supposedly pristine. Fail to assist the victim." (page 208)>>>>

    Isn't this basically what Darlie did? Call Darin into the scene to stop the clock (of her unknown activity), create a sense of urgency and panic, have him assist her at the scene, and then fail to help the victims? She is almost textbook, isn't she?

    "Detective bureaus all over the country have cases like this. Some of them are eventually solved; many are not. Domestic homicides are usually solved by quick identification of the suspect and his or her immediate commitment to the story. (page 208)

    Hats off to the Rowlett Police Dept. No investigation is perfect,but they managed to keep their wits about them long enough to notice something was amiss with Miss Darlie right from the get-go and then follow up appropriately. If not for their quick action, there would not be a case today.

    [font=Verdana,Geneva,Arial,Helvetica,Sans-Serif][/font]
     
  4. beesy

    beesy myspace.com/beesy_boo

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    This is great Goody! Um, can you read that little print though? Maybe take it up a notch? Your old eyes are holding out really well if you can read that teeny print:innocent:
     
  5. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    I can now that the doc fixed them. hahahahaha. Do you need bigger print? Why is the default print on this forum so small anyway? Must be owned by young people. hahahahahahah!
     
  6. Jeana (DP)

    Jeana (DP) Former Member

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    I tried to edit it and fix the font, but it wouldn't work. Sorry.
     
  7. HeartofTexas

    HeartofTexas New Member

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    Everyone who has trouble reading the text on this page can go to "View" in the upper lefthand corner of their window, click on text size, and then click on "largest", or whatever size helps them read the small print.

    Goody, as always, great work! It's hard not to notice how easily Darlie AND Scott P fit into what Fuhrman says above. And I guess all of these criminals think the cops are just "dumb cops". I'm glad they do, though, because it seems to help them get caught!
     
  8. HeartofTexas

    HeartofTexas New Member

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    Here's a paragraph excerpted from one of Darlie's Briefs that her own attorneys included! It's hard when reading it, and comparing it to some of Fuhrman's statements, not to laugh out loud at the absurdity of Darlie thinking people will believe what she says.

     
  9. HeartofTexas

    HeartofTexas New Member

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    Wow, something went terribly wrong with my post above. All of my comments are missing, and I don't have time to redo them right now. I'm not sure what happened with this post.
     
  10. Cassata11

    Cassata11 Praying for the lil ones

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    "This is Goody, too. I can't tell you how many times someone has walked into my cubicle, office, work area and said, "Goody, are you talking to yourself?" Talking to myself keeps me focused. Sometimes it keeps me entertained. "

    Goody...

    Thanks for the reading at lunch! Every time I sit back and question..."What if Darlie didn't do it?" ..I'm reminded that murderers are NOT unique..

    But they are cowards...

    Back to work!

    Cassata
     
  11. cami

    cami Keep your fork......

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    This is excellent Goody. I've been working on one on staging but yours beats mine all to heck. I'm anxious to read Mark's book now!!!!!

    p.s. Goody I talk to myself out loud all the time. Yes, they laugh at me at work, wondering why I am talking to my computer.
     
  12. beesy

    beesy myspace.com/beesy_boo

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  13. beesy

    beesy myspace.com/beesy_boo

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    I talk to myself all the time too, aloud even. I used to worry about it, but then I figured as long as I don't hear other people's voices in my head, then I'm cool. One of the 1st posts I read here was by Dani T. talking about how Darin and the others couldn't hear her when she screamed at them thru the puter. I understood exactly how she felt and instantly knew I'd found a good board. So you can blame Dani for keeping me here. :woohoo:
     
  14. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    I don't see a "view". Is it in the computer programs or part of this website?

    Yes, I noticed Scott Peterson in it, too. And so did Mark. He used both Scott and OJ as examples is some of his lessons. I think he teaches at a college somewhere. Not sure though. If he doesn't, he should. He is really, really good.
     
  15. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    This is my favorite Furhman quote: "The husband's actions were consistent with the behavior of middle-class suspects in domestic homicides. Call someone early to establish urgency, panic, and stop the time. Have them assist at the scene, which is supposedly pristine. Fail to assist the victim." (page 208)


    Call for help then don't help the victim. You see it in all these cases when the murderer is a family member who is trying to get away with it.
     
  16. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    "At the same time as the suspect puts on his act, he also has to be careful when describing his actions and observations. Most other suspects do not want to place themselves at the crime scene. This suspect lives there. Most other suspects don't want to have any connection to the victim. This suspect was married to her." (page 205)

    This one is Darlie all over. Exactly why she had to come up with a story that would protect her from having to know the detail.....i.e. she slept thru it, it was traumatic amnesia. Unlike Diane Downs who seemed to get off on recalling the "blood", Darlie wanted to distance herself from any recall of the actual murders. Probably for two reasons. One, it was too gruesome, and, two, she knew the monster was in the detail. Still she couldn;t seem to stop herself from trying to fill in too many details about the intruder. That is why it keep getting bigger. Each time she told it, there was more to it than the the time before.
     
  17. Goody

    Goody New Member

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  18. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    Well, be sure to come back and do them again, heart. We will be looking for them.
     
  19. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    Thanks, Cassata. Well, really I should thank Mark Furhman as this is all his work and good work at that. The man is so good with detail. I wish he would take a look at Darlie's case.
     
  20. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    LOL! Imagine if we worked together. hahahahahahah.

    Don't forget about that stuff on staging. I don't think I have ever read much on that.
     
  21. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    Well, share it with the rest of us. I don't see anything that says view except as it applies to the thread and there is nowhere to change the font size. So what am I missing?
     

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