Malaysia airlines plane may have crashed 239 people on board #16

Discussion in 'Malaysia Airline Disasters' started by gregjrichards, Mar 7, 2014.

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  1. Waddles

    Waddles Well-Known Member

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    lol, I agree entirely, I was not clear in my wording sorry, I meant the sea, I never for a split second from day one entertained the possibility of the plane being anywhere other than the ocean
     


  2. 21merc7

    21merc7 New Member

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    Weather adds to searchers woes

    http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/wa/a/22169428/weather-adds-to-searchers-woes/
     
  3. aa9511

    aa9511 New Member

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    Someone mentioned the possibility of the hijackers parachuting out. That might explain the dip to 12,000 feet, if that altitude reporting is correct.

    But where would they land? They would have to parachute out AFTER the South turn, right? The only possible land after that would be Indonesia.

    Unless they jumped out right after they programming the left turn, but that would be in the middle of the water.
     
  4. Elley Mae

    Elley Mae The enemy is here. beware

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    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/world/2014/03/09/16/30/pilot-heard-mumbling-from-malaysia-airlines-mh370

    The pilot was asked to relay a message to MH370 to establish its position on his plane's emergency frequency as authorities could not contact it.

    "We managed to establish contact with MH370 just after 1.30am (4.30am AEDT) and asked them if they have transferred into Vietnamese airspace," the pilot said.

    "The voice on the other side could have been either Captain Zahaire or Fariq, but I was sure it was the co-pilot.

    "There was a lot of interference… static… but I heard mumbling from the other end.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/15/flight-mh370-malaysia-hunt-speculation

    The pilot who said he tried to reach the flight at the behest of Vietnamese air traffic control shortly after 1.30am – when the transponders were already off – said he could hear only mumbling amid heavy interference, but believed he was probably speaking to the first officer.

    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/201...-made-contact-with-missing-malaysian-flight/#

    The captain, who declined to give his name, said his Narita, Japan-bound plane was well into into Vietnamese airspace when controllers — who could make contact — requested that he relay with his plane’s emergency frequency a message to MH370 so that it would establish its position.
    “We managed to establish contact with MH370 just after 1:30 a.m. and asked them if they have transferred into Vietnamese airspace,” the pilot reportedly told New Straits Times. “The voice on the other side could have been either Captain Zaharie (Ahmad Shah, 53,) or Fariq (Abdul Hamid, 27), but I was sure it was the co-pilot.
     
  5. 21merc7

    21merc7 New Member

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    We'll find out in a few hours if the search can happen today there. Only 3:17 a.m. in Perth.

    Meanwhile, (this article also includes a video, looks like you have to make it play, at work no speakers, so I don't know if it auto starts or not.)

    Search for MH370: Suspected debris lies above undersea volcanoes

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/sear...a-volcanoes-20140325-35gij.html#ixzz2x0I3tPLO
     
  6. Waddles

    Waddles Well-Known Member

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    Wow! that's crazy, thanks for posting this. It's really interesting.
    Almost makes you wonder if someone didn't want it found, and that is the remotest place to ditch the plane
     
  7. Hatfield

    Hatfield Well-Known Member

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    One thing really good I heard from the Australian officials at their news conference last night.

    He indicated they did in fact drop GPS marker bouyees out at the spotted debris site. So that means they will easily be able to go find that debris since the marker bouyees with GPS tracking will float along with the debris.

    It may separate somewhat due to its different shape and weight. But I do think it will be close enough to help searches relocate the spotted debris.
    He seemed very confident it will not be an issue and was one reason he is in no hurry to danger any of the searchers till weather gets better.
     
  8. 21merc7

    21merc7 New Member

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    That is truly fascinating. I don't know how well known that info is though (until now, lol). Humans don't know a lot about the ocean - still!!! Amazing, but true.

    Thanks for letting us know. I am not awake when all this goes on, so I did not get to hear that.

    It is hopeful. :tyou:
     
  9. aa9511

    aa9511 New Member

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    I disagree with Richard Quest re: "all right, good night." He's saying it's no big deal because he's heard many pilots being that casual.

    But if the Telegraph transcript is correct - we have to look at the previous communication of the co-pilot of 370 with ATC - he responds with "copy that" after every instruciton.

    He was given an instruction: Contact Ho Chi Minh City ATC, good night.

    He did not include "copy that" in his response.

    He was also a young co-pilot flying with a very veteran pilot.....I would think he would want to be precise and "formal" and show that he could do this.

    I think someone has breached the cockpit and disabled the pilots at that point.

    JMO.
     
  10. Chilly Willy

    Chilly Willy New Member

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  11. Hatfield

    Hatfield Well-Known Member

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    Unless they had a partner in a boat that was watching the low flying plane and signalled to the hijacker with his satellite phone to "JUMP". The hijacker could have also had smoke flares that we commonly see during football game skydiving jumps. Would make it easy to pluck him from water if he had life vest.
     
  12. JerseyGirl

    JerseyGirl Forum Coordinator Staff Member Forum Coordinators

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    Australia said improved weather would allow the hunt for the plane to resume Wednesday after gale-force winds and heavy rain forced a daylong delay. Searchers face a daunting task of combing a vast expanse of choppy seas for suspected remnants of the aircraft sighted earlier.

    "We're not searching for a needle in a haystack - we're still trying to define where the haystack is," Australia's deputy defence chief, Air Marshal Mark Binskin, told reporters at a military base in Perth as idled planes stood behind him.


    Read more: http://www.3news.co.nz/MH370-search...7/articleID/337401/Default.aspx#ixzz2x0MU7Iup


    ________

    “As many as 12 aircraft are expected to be involved in the search tomorrow (today), including seven military aircraft and five civil aircraft,” it added.

    According to the AMSA, the Royal Australian Navy's HMAS Success will return to the search area and conduct a surface sweep of an area identified Monday afternoon by a Royal Australian Air Force P3 Orion as the location "for several objects of interest".

    “A total of six countries are now assisting in the search - Australia, New Zealand, the US, Japan, China and South Korea,” the statement said.

    “India has also offered to join the search and recovery operation.”

    China’s polar supply ship Xue Long or Snow Dragon and three other Chinese ships are also expected to arrive in the search area on Wednesday.

    http://zeenews.india.com/news/world/hunt-for-lost-malaysian-jet-to-resume-today_920248.html
     
  13. JerseyGirl

    JerseyGirl Forum Coordinator Staff Member Forum Coordinators

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    Any attempt to retrieve the wreckage of doomed flight MH370 will have to navigate an uncharted chain of giant underwater volcanoes, an Australian marine geologist says.

    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/technology/2014/03/26/05/45/indian-ocean-sea-floor-unmapped

    Robin Beaman from James Cook University said the active search zone in the Indian Ocean lays above a sea floor with an average depth of 3000m that has not been mapped in detail.

    He told Fairfax Media any recovery operation would first require extensive 3D mapping of the area, likely by ships with deep ocean multibeam echo sounders.

    Such devices can map a sea floor by sending out sound pulses in the shape of a fan directly under the ship and on either side. But the only Australian ship capable of charting such a depth, the RV Southern Surveyor, was decommissioned last December, Dr Beaman said.

    Its replacement was still being built in Singapore, he added.
     
  14. Tssiemer

    Tssiemer Well-Known Member

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    Ok so this is funny. And it's accurate. At first I thought it would be in bad taste regarding the actual missing plan itself but it did a great job poking fun at CNN. But I must admit I found myself engulfed in the wall to wall coverage of no real news.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. Hatfield

    Hatfield Well-Known Member

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    This is a description of what the marker boyees do and is very similar to the marker bouyees that I beleive were thrown out near the spotted debris. There even was video footage of one being thrown out but not sure if it was just example footage or real footage.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-locating_datum_marker_buoy
     
  16. Kimster

    Kimster Former Member

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    I used to think it would be impossible for a plane to be lost in this day and age. I guess technology still has it's limits.

    And I still hold out hope that at least some of them found safety somehow - praying for a miracle! :please:
     
  17. JerseyGirl

    JerseyGirl Forum Coordinator Staff Member Forum Coordinators

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  18. aa9511

    aa9511 New Member

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    black box finder just reached Australia - but don't they have just a few days to find it? And they don't even know where the debris field is yet.
     
  19. Hatfield

    Hatfield Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, they have a limited number of days until the battery on the black box runs out and stops transmitting its "blip". I heard on one of the news sites that even though they are desinged to last lets say 30 days, they will sometimes keep "blipping" for a period of time after that even. Which is good news.

    There is no guarantee after the 30 day design (or whatever design is) but it sounded like they commonly will keep working for like up to 20 more days or even more beyond their design depending on conditions until it finally runs out.

    The officials will probably try to use that locator as soon as they spot most of the debris field with the hopes of picking up the black box signal. They probably would have liked to have waited till for sure where plane is but I bet they go out early as soon as main debris is spotted.
     
  20. Boodles

    Boodles Well-Known Member

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