Mass drug overdoses in NYC

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by BetteDavisEyes, Jul 13, 2016.

  1. BetteDavisEyes

    BetteDavisEyes All the boys think she's a spy...

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    33 Hospitalized After Calls About Mass K2 Overdose in Brooklyn: NYPD

    The NYPD said that at least five were reportedly smoking the cheap synthetic cannabinoid commonly called K2


    By Lori Bordonaro

    Thirty-three people were taken to the hospital Tuesday morning after authorities responded to calls of people overdosing on K2 near a Brooklyn intersection that has been called one of the worst spots in New York City for synthetic drug use.

    Authorities said the victims were taken to Woodhull and Wyckohoff hospitals after authorities were called to the scene near Broadway and Myrtle Avenue in Bedford-Stuyvesant...

    http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/loca...rooklyn-Bedford-Stuyvesant-NYC-386499841.html
     
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  3. BetteDavisEyes

    BetteDavisEyes All the boys think she's a spy...

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    33 sickened in apparent mass drug overdose in New York City

    New York City health officials are warning people about the dangers of using the synthetic marijuana K2 after more than two dozen people were sickened in an apparent mass drug overdose on a city street corner


    July 13, 2016, at 12:17 a.m.

    NEW YORK (AP) — New York City health officials are warning people about the dangers of using the synthetic marijuana K2 after more than two dozen people were sickened in an apparent mass drug overdose on a city street corner.

    It happened Tuesday in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn.

    Witnesses reported seeing victims lying on the sidewalk, shaking and leaning against trees and fire hydrants...

    http://www.usnews.com/news/news/art...-apparent-mass-drug-overdose-in-new-york-city
     
  4. BetteDavisEyes

    BetteDavisEyes All the boys think she's a spy...

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    Jul 13 2016, 3:25 pm ET

    Everything You Need to Know About K2, the Drug Linked to Mass Overdose

    by Linda Carroll

    Despite dire warnings about the dangers of synthetic cannabinoids, popularly known by names such as K2, Spice, Black Mamba and Kronic, they continue to grow in popularity. Just yesterday, 33 people were rushed to the hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y. with symptoms that suggested an overdose on the drugs, according to an NBC4 New York report. The city's health department told the station that there have been more than 6,000 K2-related emergency room visits and two confirmed deaths in New York City since 2015. In January, the American Association of Poison Control Centers listed 1,462 exposures...

    http://www.nbcnews.com/health/healt...ow-about-k2-drug-linked-mass-overdose-n608726
     
  5. scmom

    scmom New Member

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  6. Blondie in Spokane

    Blondie in Spokane Well-Known Member

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    This stuff is scary!
     
  7. Blondie in Spokane

    Blondie in Spokane Well-Known Member

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  8. scmom

    scmom New Member

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    K2 is “wholly man-made, made by persons unknown, assembled by persons unknown, under unknown conditions in unknown places,” said Robert Messner, the Police Department’s assistant deputy commissioner for civil enforcement, during a news briefing at the Police Academy in Queens.

    A chemical is typically sprayed over leaves, giving it the appearance of marijuana, but, Mr. Messner said, it is closer to more virulent drugs such as bath salts.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/15/n...-york-at-least-130-cases-this-week-alone.html
     
  9. scmom

    scmom New Member

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  10. Blondie in Spokane

    Blondie in Spokane Well-Known Member

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    (RSBM)

    I have no idea! I have smoked weed many times and am all for it - but this stuff? No way! In reading thru a couple articles, they state that the added spices, ingredients etc are never equally the same quantity per dose so you can't be sure how intense the effect/rush will be. Way too easy to OD.

    ETA: I just re-read your linked CNN article scmom....I was always under the impression that K2 was regular weed mixed with spices & other cr@p. Now, per your above link, I see that it's basically spices (no weed) which have been sprayed with God knows what. I learned something new today. Thanks!
     
  11. ArianeEmory

    ArianeEmory I know the pieces fit

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    I think the sense it's *supposed* to be a synthetic cannabinoid in the same way something like Vicodin is a synthetic opioid. In other words, it's not the "synthetic" part that's the problem. But with no "quality control" happening, who knows what people are really getting.
     
  12. cuffem

    cuffem Active Member

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    I wish they would legalize marijuana.
     
  13. AlwaysShocked

    AlwaysShocked Active Member

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    And this is the risk with EVERY street drug. Basically, unless obtained from a pharmacy our perhaps from a family member's prescription bottle, a drug user can never know what they are taking. Many, many of the so-called "genuine pharmaceutical pills" being bought by addicts are being produced in genuinely nasty black market "pharmacies". They are then stamped, packaged, shipped and sold.

    Think about the desire for "designer handbags" and the cost of them. Then think about the look-alike "knock offs" available on every street corner in New York City.
    There's a market for the fakes and there's money to be made in selling them.

    Does anyone think this isn't going on in the drug world?

    Bad pills manufactured badly is one of a number of possible reasons for an unexpected overdose.
     
  14. AlwaysShocked

    AlwaysShocked Active Member

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    A bit off topic, but something more people should know: The reason patients are told not to split a pill that is not already scored by the manufacturer is because the drug manufacturers are not required to use the same process for an unscored tablet as they are when manufacturing a scored tablet. When the tablet is scored, there is the requirement that the active drug ingredient be evenly distributed throughout the tablet. So if a patient cuts the tablet in half, they will receive 50% of the total drug contained in the entire tablet.

    They are NOT required to produce this type of regulated distribution of the active medication when a tablet is not scored. So theoretically there could be 75% or more of the drug in one side of an unscored tablet and only 25% or less in the other side.
     
  15. MzOpinion8d

    MzOpinion8d On Time Out

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    It causes a LOT of seizure activity, which I suspect is going largely under-reported. In our medical screening at the jail we ask if they've ever had a seizure, and the frequency of "yes" has increased, and then when asked if they have a seizure disorder, they say "It happened after I smoked K2".

    Some of them went to the hospital but a lot didn't. So there's not good tracking info.
     
  16. GeeEm

    GeeEm New Member

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    DrugFacts: Synthetic Cannabinoids

    What are synthetic cannabinoids?

    Synthetic cannabinoids refer to a growing number of man-made mind-altering chemicals that are either sprayed on dried, shredded plant material so they can be smoked (herbal incense) or sold as liquids to be vaporized and inhaled in e-cigarettes and other devices (liquid incense).

    These chemicals are called cannabinoids because they are related to chemicals found in the marijuana plant. Because of this similarity, synthetic cannabinoids are sometimes misleadingly called "synthetic marijuana" (or "fake weed"), and they are often marketed as "safe," legal alternatives to that drug. In fact, they may affect the brain much more powerfully than marijuana; their actual effects can be unpredictable and, in some cases, severe or even life-threatening.

    False Advertising

    Synthetic cannabinoid products are often labeled "not for human consumption." Labels also often claim that they contain "natural" material taken from a variety of plants. However, the only parts of these products that are natural are the dried plant materials. Chemical tests show that the active, mind-altering ingredients are cannabinoid compounds made in laboratories.
    Synthetic cannabinoids are included in a group of drugs called "new psychoactive substances" (NPS). NPS are unregulated psychoactive (mind-altering) substances that have become newly available on the market and are intended to copy the effects of illegal drugs. Some of these substances may have been around for years but have reentered the market in altered chemical forms or due to renewed popularity.

    Manufacturers sell these herbal incense products in colorful foil packages and sell similar liquid incense products, like other e-cigarette fluids, in plastic bottles. They market these products under a wide variety of specific brand names; in past years, K2 and Spice were common. Hundreds of other brand names now exist, such as Joker, Black Mamba, Kush, and Kronic.

    For several years, synthetic cannabinoid mixtures have been easy to buy in drug paraphernalia shops, novelty stores, gas stations, and through the Internet. Because the chemicals used in them have a high potential for abuse and no medical benefit, authorities have made it illegal to sell, buy, or possess some of these chemicals. However, manufacturers try to sidestep these laws by changing the chemical formulas in their mixtures.

    Easy access and the belief that synthetic cannabinoid products are "natural" and therefore harmless have likely contributed to their use among young people. Another reason for their use is that standard drug tests cannot easily detect many of the chemicals used in these products.

    Colorful packets of K2 and Spice.
    How do people use synthetic cannabinoids?

    Users usually smoke the dried plant material sprayed with synthetic cannabinoids. Sometimes they mix the sprayed plant material with marijuana, or they brew it as tea. Other users buy synthetic cannabinoid products as liquids to vaporize them in e-cigarettes.

    How do synthetic cannabinoids affect the brain?

    Synthetic cannabinoids act on the same brain cell receptors as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the mind-altering ingredient in marijuana.

    So far, there have been few scientific studies of the effects of synthetic cannabinoids on the human brain, but researchers do know that some of them bind more strongly than marijuana to the cell receptors affected by THC, and may produce much stronger effects. The resulting health effects can be unpredictable.

    Because the chemical composition of many synthetic cannabinoid products is unknown and may change from batch to batch, these products are likely to contain substances that cause dramatically different effects than the user might expect.

    Synthetic cannabinoid users report some effects similar to those produced by marijuana:

    elevated mood
    relaxation
    altered perception—awareness of surrounding objects and conditions
    symptoms of psychosis—delusional or disordered thinking detached from reality
    Blurred night view of the city with distorted streaks of colored lights.


    extreme anxiety
    confusion
    paranoia—extreme and unreasonable distrust of others
    hallucinations—sensations and images that seem real though they are not
    What are some other health effects of synthetic cannabinoids?

    People who have used synthetic cannabinoids and have been taken to emergency rooms have shown severe effects including:

    rapid heart rate
    vomiting
    violent behavior
    suicidal thoughts
    Synthetic cannabinoids can also raise blood pressure and cause reduced blood supply to the heart, as well as kidney damage and seizures. Use of these drugs is associated with a rising number of deaths.

    Are synthetic cannabinoids addictive:

    Yes, synthetic cannabinoids can be addictive. Regular users trying to quit may have the following withdrawal symptoms:

    headaches
    anxiety
    depression
    irritability
    Behavioral therapies and medications have not specifically been tested for treatment of addiction to these products.

    Points to Remember

    Synthetic cannabinoids refer to a growing number of man-made mind-altering chemicals sprayed on dried, shredded plant material or vaporized to get high.
    Synthetic cannabinoids are sometimes misleadingly called "synthetic marijuana" (or "fake weed") because they act on the same brain cell receptors as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the mind-altering ingredient in marijuana.
    The effects of synthetic cannabinoids can be unpredictable and severe or even life-threatening.
    The only parts of synthetic cannabinoid products that are "natural" are the dried plant materials. Chemical tests show that their active ingredients are man-made cannabinoid compounds.
    Synthetic cannabinoid users report some effects similar to those produced by marijuana:
    elevated mood
    relaxation
    altered perception
    symptoms of psychosis
    Synthetic cannabinoids can also cause serious mental and physical health problems including:
    rapid heart rate
    vomiting
    violent behavior
    suicidal thoughts
    Synthetic cannabinoids can be addictive.

    https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/synthetic-cannabinoids
     

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