ME - If Under 14, All Sex Must Be Reported To The DA

Discussion in 'Crimes-Spotlight on Children' started by Wudge, Oct 26, 2007.

  1. Wudge

    Wudge New Member

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  3. GlitchWizard

    GlitchWizard Reprobate

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    Just from the quote, I'm picturing motion detectors strapped to the thighs of young teens.

    (I ASSUME it means "sexually active" in general, however, not at the moment.)
     
  4. GlitchWizard

    GlitchWizard Reprobate

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    " Abuse also must be reported to the appropriate district attorney's office, Anderson said, when the suspected perpetrator is someone other than the minor's parent or guardian. "

    So, if it's the parent or guardian, it doesn't get reported there?
     
  5. Wudge

    Wudge New Member

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    Parents will find out after charges are filed.
     
  6. Rino

    Rino Former Member

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    :eek:
     
  7. mom3dd

    mom3dd Be Better at Every Age

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    When it's somebody under age 14, it is a crime and it must be reported," Anderson said. "The health care provider has no discretion in the matter. It's up to the district attorney to decide."

    Anderson said she contacted Portland officials after she learned that some employees of the health centers, which are operated by the city's Public Health Division, believed they could decide whether a child's sexual activity constituted criminal abuse.

    In fact, if a child under age 14 was having consensual sex with someone of a similar age, health center employees weren't reporting it to the proper authorities, said City Attorney Gary Wood.

    Anderson said doctors and other health care providers in private practice may falsely believe they have similar leeway, but they must follow the same laws.

    "It's clear that it's going on all the time," Anderson said. "Either the law is going to be enforced or it needs to be changed. I don't think a law should be routinely violated."

    Portland's six school-based health centers had no formal policy on reporting sexual activity involving students under age 14, said Douglas Gardner, director of Portland's Department of Health and Human Services.

    http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/story.php?id=143117&ac=PHnws
     
  8. pedinurse

    pedinurse Former Member

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    so basically, the DA has a problem with the school giving out BC. so... now, this won't happen. or at least, the teens won't be honest with the provider. this will really cause problems with the healthcare provided.

    now we're gonna have a bunch of preggo middle schoolers. thanks, mr. DA. you know what i think that stands for.

    flame away, peeps!

    i say that because i don't think that the providers at that school would EVER give out BC pills to a middle schooler unless they thought it was justified. period. and i think they would report if they ever thought there was a child in danger. :-(

    i know people don't want to think about their precious babies out there, having sex. but, regardless, SOME teens are sexually active. or, some people think that the teens getting BC pills gives them permission to have sex. well, the teens are seeking the pills out for a reason. to protect themselves. if you put up a roadblock to make them not get it (the pills... and they wanted them! because they planned to be active, or they were already active, which in many times was the case) they will have sex anyway... this just provides them with protection against unwanted pregnancy. i actually applaud them for trying to be responsible and avoid pregnancy. also, when they give out the BC pills, the provider ALWAYS counsels on delaying sexual activity in the teenage years. always. even if they are already active. because it is risky. the STD risk is higher. among other things. risk for other stuff is shown to be increased too with early sexual activity. so no, providers don't want to ENCOURAGE activity. but if they are presenting to the provider saying "i'm sexually active" do we want to protect them against an unwanted pregnancy? you betcha!!!!

    i know you don't want to think that your sweet children could honestly have sex at this tender age... yes, middle school is young... but i REALLY hate to think of your sweet children having children at this age, either. the alternative is that instead of them being able to seek out this method, they could just end up pregnant. or, they will end up having sex and not have this reproductive healthcare available to them (this clinic offers all services) and their ability to reproduce in the future will be effected (I am sure they do STD screening there as well, as it says they offer a FULL range of STD screening).
     
  9. Jeana (DP)

    Jeana (DP) Former Member

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    Its always been my contention that parents should be providing birth control to their children.
     
  10. pedinurse

    pedinurse Former Member

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    they have to sign permission for the kids to use the clinic at the school.
    i say, compromise. have two forms. one that allows for medical stuff...if your kid sprains her arm at school.
    then one that allows the providers to do reproductive healthcare on the kids... sign it if you want to allow it. don't sign it if you don't.

    but the bad thing with that is that the two merge sooo much. a sore throat? EASILY could be an STD infection!!! how do you call mom and dad and say that the 14 year old sweetheart of a girl you have in the office has a gonorrhea infection of the throat that needs to be treated and that you need consent? gig would be up then because you don't have prior consent. and i'm not sure that with HIPPA laws you could come out and say what the organism was and that it was an STD to the parents, because children are afforded privacy protect under HIPPA as well.
     
  11. Jeana (DP)

    Jeana (DP) Former Member

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    I agree. When my first son was about the age of 14, I purchased a box of condoms and placed them in his room. He came out with this look on his face :confused: . I said "NO, you're not old enough to do it, but if you're dumb enough to do it, at least be smart enough to use one."

    That's my feeling on the topic. None of us wants to believe that our teens will be having sex, but that doesn't mean they won't. We're not just preventing pregnancy. These days, sex can give them diseases that cannot be cured. If parents must think of it as a disease preventative, so be it, just DO IT~!
     
  12. Wudge

    Wudge New Member

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    "It's clear that it's going on all the time," Anderson said. "Either the law is going to be enforced or it needs to be changed. I don't think a law should be routinely violated."


    Changing the law would be a dream come true for pedophiles.
     
  13. ziggy

    ziggy New Member

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    I'm so concerned on many levels here but the main one is that giving birth control pills DOES NOT address the issue of STDs. Like PediNurse said, a kid can get oral STDs and many of them don't know that! If it really is necessary for kids to have sex, then shouldn't they make a kid take a test to see if they have enough knowledge about being sexually active before just handing out medication? I mean, a good, well-rounded test to see if they understand the emotional mess they may be getting into as well as the physical danger. Then they could be counseled at least in the areas they are clueless in.

    I just believe kids should be excluded from the privacy act. When you are 100% responsible, you need 100% of the information. Think of it as you would any job...your boss puts you in charge, but sets you up to fail by letting others keep vital information from you in order for you to do the best job you can. We are setting parents up to fail and that is so sad. How about instead we prop up the failing parents?
     
  14. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    Not necessarily. Many jurisdictions prohibit sex between an adult and a young teen and mandate reporting, without shutting off communication and criminalizing young teens who have sex with one another.

    I promise you I hate the idea 13- or 14-year-olds having sex with anyone, but I fail to see how driving them away from essential medical services is going to improve their situation.
     
  15. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    We need to make ALL early teens pass that test, whether or not they plan to have sex.
     
  16. believe09

    believe09 Active Member

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    Hey, now-who is checking these kids for family history of heart disease, clot disorders, high blood pressure and to see if they are smoking before they are handing out birth control pills? Not to mention the ones with histories of endometrial and breast cancer before we start them on hormone therapies? I must have missed that part of the article....But by all means let's be concerned about who we report who they are having sex with...have they had a baby boom in 6th grade in Maine?? Sheesh, I have a niece and nephew who just moved there last year....
     
  17. pedinurse

    pedinurse Former Member

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    Oh, I understand the frusteration about the HIPPA law and the parental stuff. But I can also understand the other side of the coin too. I do have a bigger problem when it is younger teens, definetly. The older ones? Sometimes, I'm kinda like... give them their privacy. I have gotten a lot more tolerant over the years. Seen too many 17 year olds I guess that are living with their boyfriends who are admitted to the peds floor! I'm kind of like... if you're letting your 17 year old LIVE with her boyfriend, guess what? She's entitled to her privacy!! But yes... I COMPLETELY understand. But it's there, in the law. That DOESN'T exclude HC providers from reporting illegal activity, suspicious activity, hotlining, ect. At all!
    Due to HIPPA, we cannot give sexually based information to the parents... and we have to remove it from the chart if the parents ask to review the chart, if there is "stuff" in there. We are just discreet about it, and the parents don't know the difference. If stuff is to go to the house where they are to see it (billing for labs, ect) then there are even supposed to be some privacy guards there as well. Privacy in these matters is why when patients go to the OB/GYN, they must sign release forms for the office to specifically give information to certain people. The last one I went to made me sign forms re: name, address, AND date of birth for my spouse and emergency contact if they wanted to call and get information on me or my lab results or medical condition. I thought that was a LITTLE specific, but it was no biggie for me!

    Teaching for the pill for teens is to use a back up method when having sex to protect one's self, and to have "safer" sex. Sex outside of marriage is risky. Sexual activity at a young age is considered to be especially risky in the "eyes" of the medical community. Believe me, it isn't taken lightly from the medical point of view. Risky, risky, risky! Risk is increased especially for teens who are not in stable relationships. So, the use of condoms is automatically taught with a contraceptive method to help decrease the spread of STD's. Teens are often HORRIBLE about taking their pills every day or at the same time each day, which decreases their effectiveness, so this teaching helps keep them safer and decreases the incidence of pregnancy.
    So, I would certainly hope and am 99% positive that if they are implementing an oral contraceptive distribution option with this age group... and they already had a condom distribution program in place (for years)... they would include this teaching as well. It's just another barrier put into place to protect the kids. I think they are just trying to provide the most comprehensive healthcare possible to a group of kids who DOESN'T have it available!
    But seriously... people bring their babies in for well baby check ups, for their shots... and when they are fully immunized at age two? After that, we don't see them unless the kids are sick or need MORE shots to go to school or have some weird rash or a have to have a sports physical. We hardly ever see teens for just regular well kid stuff. After age two, if we see a kid regularly, its because they are from REALLY good families! And those are the ones who will put their daughters on birth control if the girls go and ask for it, because the parents talk to their daughters, and they have good relationships with their kids. They will go to their primary care providers for birth control, and it will be a very private thing for them. And birth control is more of a "well" thing than a sick thing. So I doubt that some of those decreased interaction families would bring the kid in for that. You know what I mean?

    But then you have the kids who are at RISK. I think those will be the ones using the clinic. These kids are at for risk drug use, early pregnancy, and STD's. You can't tell me that MOST of these kids that were in jr. high that ended up having early sexual activity and getting pregnant early probably weren't in a high "risk" category due to a 1) horrible home life or 2) or decreased parental interaction. And those are the kids who have DECREASED access to medical care. Those kids are not going to be getting proper medical care - mom and dad aren't going to NOTICE that they are having risky behaviors, or they don't have the time to. They aren't going to get an STD check, condoms, and BC pills if they need it. Maybe if this is available to them at school, maybe the kid can get it for themselves.
    Or, the third option is, maybe if the kid is too embarrassed to go to mom and dad, maybe this is a good option too. But options 1 and 2 are going to FAR outweigh the "embarrassed" option.
    Those are my thoughts.
    I hope that all rambling!! makes sense.
     
  18. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    It makes perfect sense, pedinurse. Thanks for that informed report from the front lines.
     
  19. Wudge

    Wudge New Member

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    Perfect logic. Thus, expect grave punishment.
     
  20. Wudge

    Wudge New Member

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    When the D.A. must know what parents cannot, Houston, we have a problem. So, change the law by reducing the legal age for sex (pedophiles rejoice). Or make parents equal to District Attorneys.

    (fearing answers)
     
  21. pedinurse

    pedinurse Former Member

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    you're so sweet nova. whenever i log back into a "charged' thread waiting to get "whooped" (even if it doesn't happen, or hasn't happened yet), I can usually count on a response to from you!
     

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