Mexico's Congress decriminalizes possession of cocaine, heroin, ecstasy, pot ..

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by 13th Juror, Apr 29, 2006.

  1. 13th Juror

    13th Juror Inactive

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    Mexico poised to allow small amounts of drugs


    Congress decriminalizes possession of cocaine, heroin, ecstasy, pot​


    MEXICO CITY - Mexico's Congress approved a bill Friday decriminalizing possession of small amounts of marijuana, ecstasy, cocaine and heroin for personal use - a measure sure to raise questions in Washington about Mexico's commitment to the war on drugs.

    The only step remaining was the signature of the president, whose office indicated he would sign it.

    Mexican officials hope the law will help police focus on large-scale trafficking operations, rather than minor drug busts. The bill also stiffens penalties for trafficking and possession of drugs "even small quantities" by government employees or near schools, and maintains criminal penalties for drug sales.

    The Bush administration had no immediate reaction.

    The bill, passed by Mexico's Senate on a 53-26 vote with one abstention, had already been approved in the lower house of Congress and was sent to the desk of President Vicente Fox for his signature.

    This law gives police and prosecutors better legal tools to combat drug crimes that do so much damage to our youth and children, presidential spokesman Ruben Aguilar said.

    The bill says criminal charges will no longer be brought for possession of up to 25 milligrams of heroin, five grams of marijuana (about one-fifth of an ounce, or about four joints), and half a gram of cocaine - about half the standard street-size quantity, which is enough for several lines of the drug.

    Array of other drugs allowed

    No charges will be brought against ... addicts or consumers who are found in possession of any narcotic for personal use, according to the Senate bill, which also lays out allowable quantities for a large array of other drugs, including LSD, MDA, ecstasy "about two pills worth," and amphetamines.

    Some of the amounts are eye-popping: Mexicans would be allowed to possess 2.2 pounds of peyote, the button-sized hallucinogenic cactus used in some native Indian religious ceremonies.

    Mexican law now leaves open the possibility of dropping charges against people caught with drugs if they are considered addicts and if the amount is the quantity necessary for personal use. But the exemption isn't automatic.

    The new bill drops the "addict requirement" - automatically allowing any "consumers" to have drugs and sets out specific allowable quantities.


    Sale of all drugs would remain illegal under the proposed law, unlike the Netherlands, where the sale of marijuana for medical use is legal and it can be bought with a prescription in pharmacies.

    While Dutch authorities look the other way regarding the open sale of cannabis in designated coffee shops, something Mexican police seem unlikely to do, the Dutch have zero tolerance for heroin and cocaine. In both countries, commercial growing of marijuana is outlawed.

    The effects could be significant, given that Mexico is rapidly becoming a drug-consuming nation as well as a shipment point for traffickers, and given the number of U.S. students who flock to border cities or resorts like Cancun and Acapulco on vacation.

    This is going to increase addictions in Mexico, said Ulisis Bon, a drug treatment expert in Tijuana, where heroin use is rampant. A lot of Americans already come here to buy medications they can't get up there ... Just imagine, with heroin.

    MSNBC & The Associated Press
    Thursday - 8:46 p.m. ET April 28, 2006


    13th Juror
     
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  3. Jean

    Jean Former Member

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    Man, this is really bad news.

    A Quote "The Bush administration had no immediate reaction." Bush just doesn't have a clue as to what is going on--even if he did, he wouldn't know what to do about it. This news just really upsets me. :(
     
  4. Pandora

    Pandora New Member

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    (Insert sarcastic voice here)
    Maybe our drug users will illegally immigrate to a country where their behavior isn't criminalized.
    :truce:
     
  5. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    I don't see how this would negatively affect us or Mexico. In fact, it might even drastically cut down on the rampant corruption & violence associated with the illegal drug trade in Mexico.
     
  6. txsvicki

    txsvicki Active Member

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    Someone has to be selling these people their "small" amounts of personal use drugs. Those people will still be selling and it will still be against the law to sell it but okay for the people to have it?
     
  7. Details

    Details Former Member

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    It just makes the drug problem worse, if the buyers have no fear, it'll be more and more common to use drugs, more and more money going to the drug cartels, which translates to more and more power and guns and violence. It's either the first step towards complete legalization, or a really, really dumb move.
     
  8. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    It would follow Amsterdam's structure, where the only legal means of buying the drugs would be from government-approved sellers (ie the governement). It would also be taxed, but considerably cheaper and easier to obtain.

    As it is, you can walk into any pharmacia in Tijuana and buy anabolic steroids, Viagra and virtually every presciption drug you can imagine without a prescription, but in regulated lot amounts.

    Basically, fighting the drug war has done nothing for Mexico (or America) except drain resources and make the criminals more clever/violent. If you take the financial motivation out of the illegal drug trade by making it a legal, you basically either turn the drug lords into legit business men or seriously decrease their numbers, just like what happened following Prohibition in this country.
     
  9. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    You're envisioning it as everything staying the same as it is when it's illegal. The same arguements were made re the liquor trade when Roosevelt pledged to end Prohibition. The use of drugs will never go away in human society, especially since some drugs are deemed okay and others aren't. When I watch TV and see pharmaeceutical companies shilling everything from Vaigra to "Restless Leg Syndrome" pills, I'm reminded of this hypocrisy. Just say no to drugs, unless you're depressed, impotent, have high cholesterol or ADHD, apparently.
     
  10. Details

    Details Former Member

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    When prohibition was ended, both buying and selling were legal again. When you make only buying, but not selling legal, you make a criminal class wealthy.
     
  11. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    Like I said, the government--or companies authorized by the government, such as the pharmacia--will be the ones doing the legal selling.

    It's still illegal to make and sell liquor outside the state-authorized venues, by the way--it's called moonshining, and people still do it and the Feds still go after them. (Hence the origin of NASCAR) But it's nowhere near the problem it was 75 years ago. It's a question of legalization versus massive police corruption and running gun battles in the street. Which, in the long run, is more hazardous to the citizenry?
     
  12. SpongeBathHotPants

    SpongeBathHotPants Verified insider - Kenneth Coakley case

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    I know where the family is going on vacation this year!!! WOOHOO!
    :crazy: :crazy: :crazy: :crazy: :crazy: :crazy:

    kidding...
     
  13. Masterj

    Masterj Active Member

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    LOL, SpongeBathHotPants made a funny! :laugh:
     
  14. Jeana (DP)

    Jeana (DP) Former Member

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    I just read that Mexico is losing its middle class to America.. Maybe America can lose its drug addicts to Mexico. :cool:
     
  15. JBean

    JBean Retired WS Administrator

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    latest report is that Fox caved into pressure from Washington about this issue and is reconsidering his position. Maybe there is hope yet.
     
  16. 13th Juror

    13th Juror Inactive

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    Hey, Jellybean n' all :)

    Yes, I heard late last night on one of the cable news stations that President Fox definitely will not sign congress's bill to legalize drugs in Mexico. Great news!!! :D

    I was really angry and extremely disillusioned when I initially heard of Mexico's devastating bill "to legalize all those personal use mind altering poisons". :furious:


    IMO - illegal street drugs and the dealers (& users) are the scourge of our nation. I get so sick of hearing people make excuses for drug & alcohol abuse - calling it "a disease" and expecting sympathy/empathy. Disease, my foot! It certainly can and too often does become "an addiction" - but it's "a personal choice" one makes to take the drugs in order to 'chill out' or somehow alter their perception of reality. Foolish pitiful losers in my book ... no sympathy here.


    13th Juror
     

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