Missing/Murdered Indigenous Person Data Crisis: NamUs 2.0; 2019

Discussion in 'Missing Persons Resources' started by imstilla.grandma, Nov 16, 2019.

  1. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    ****I’ve been reading several threads following and discovering this sad and unfair true trend. So many that I thought I’d start this thread to highlight this opportunity to educate and inform myself and others. Have many of y’all heard about a lot of this going on - the rates of missing and murdered women unreported and/or basically ignored? I grew up,pmlearning mostly about my Indian heritage at school and with family. It wasn’t until much later in life - I went to a LE conference in Vermont. A bunch of us went to the casinos. It was so strange - that I thought it was strange to hear about some other tribes I was under familiar with. I’d forgotten how Indians come from all areas of the US particularly in the north it seems.


    The lack of a full accounting of missing indigenous persons in the United States is often referred to as a “data crisis”. While nationwide missing person databases do exist, it is clear these systems do not currently contain records of all American Indian and Alaska Native men and women who have gone missing. There are many reasons for this gap in information collection and sharing, such as lack of clear law enforcement protocols related to missing adults, complex tribal jurisdictional issues, and lack of awareness of the vast resources available to tribal law enforcement agencies, tribal leaders, and family members of missing indigenous persons through the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, or NamUs.

    NIJ and NamUs staff will continue to provide outreach to Indian country and are committed to providing training and technical assistance to the stakeholders in this community, and especially support struggling families through the new NamUs Victim Services Unit being launched in 2019. While much has been said about the levels of crime and violence in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities there still remains no conclusive “number”, only the agreement that the levels are staggering. The NIJ-supported study, “Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey,” released in 2016 found that more than four in five AI/AN adults (83 percent) have experienced some form of violence in their lifetime. Since inception, NamUs has been used to resolve 358 indigenous missing person cases, and is currently supporting another 385 active, unsolved cases of missing indigenous persons. But we know we can do more. We can solve the missing indigenous person data crisis by working collectively to ensure that every missing person is entered into NamUs.

    Currently eight states (NY, MI, TN, IL, OK, AR, WV, and NM) have passed legislation mandating case entry into NamUs; Pennsylvania has introduced a bill in the state legislature to do the same. While none of these laws have any “enforcement” component, the continued expansion of state laws, and/or federal legislation, directly mandating case entry would help to address the issue.
    Solving the Missing Indigenous Person Data Crisis: NamUs 2.0
     
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  2. mickey2942

    mickey2942 Well-Known Member

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  3. Stunned

    Stunned Well-Known Member

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    Wow! Welcome back! Wonderful eye opening post!
     
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  4. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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  5. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    More than 600,000 people go missing every year in the United States. Of those, tens of thousands remain missing a year later. And each year, more than 4,000 unidentified bodies are recovered by law enforcement across the country.

    In late 2015, plans to rebuild NamUs began. Development of the application started in 2016, and in May 2018, NamUs 2.0 was released.

    Nearly a quarter of the 4,400 unidentified bodies recovered every year nationwide remain unidentified after a year.
    Vanished: Winston-Salem police work to solve 41 missing persons cases dating back to 1970
     
  6. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    You’re right. Of course, all people count. Especially with statistics like theses:

    We’re quickly seeing so much technology and DNA advancements; I’m hopeful many more of the lost, murdered and forgotten will soon have their name and final resting ground found.




    Crimes Against Children Research Center (CCRC)
    Crimes Against Children Research Center

    Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI): Violent Crimes Against Children
    Violent Crimes Against Children/Online Predators | Federal Bureau of Investigation

    National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC)
    Home

    Special Feature: Missing Children – Statistics | NCJRS


    An example study of Data and Measures:
    The study population consists of 1,047,081 children who were either in custody of the Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF) on January 1, 2011 or had investigated allegations of human trafficking between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2017. For these children, data include all child welfare events, such as investigated maltreatment allegations, out-of-home placements, and missing from care episodes, between birth and age 18 (or December 31, 2017).
    https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/253456.pdf
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2019
  7. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    upload_2019-11-17_7-44-6.jpeg
    Credit: Left, “Every One,” 2018, by Cannupa Hanska Luger with “Sister,” 2016, by Kali Spitzer at the Gardiner Museum in Toronto.Credit...Rachel Weiner/Gardiner Museum

    By displaying the piece (which Ms. Spitzer and Mr. Luger say was created “in solidarity”), the Gardiner hopes to bring visitors face to face with a horrific issue known by variations of M.M.I.W.: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women.

    In June, the Canadian government released a report after a nearly three-year inquiry found that 1,181 indigenous women were killed or had disappeared across the country from 1980 to 2012. Estimates by indigenous women’s groups have put the number much higher.

    The problem is not unique to Canada: Although the issue has attracted less attention in the United States, the National Crime Information Center reported that in 2016, there were 5,712 reports of missing American Indian and Alaska Native women and girls. Only 116 of those were logged in the United States Department of Justice’s missing persons database, the report said.

    In both countries, many of these unsolved cases are said to have been the result of indifference and lax law enforcement in their communities. “Whoever is doing what they’re doing, they think they can kill all these women, and nothing will come of it because they’re just ‘Indians,’” the brother of one murdered woman said earlier this year.
    Illuminating the Plight of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women
     
  8. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    A bill signed by the governor this year calls for the committee to determine the scope of the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women in New Mexico. Members also are expected to identify factors that might be hindering law enforcement investigations.

    The taskforce has until November 2020 to report findings.
    10 things to know: New Mexico task force on missing & murdered Indigenous women
     
  9. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    In June 2019,a three-year national inquiry that included testimony from 1,500 members of the First Nations, Inuit and Métis concluded that the number of missing and murdered women in the country amounted to genocide.

    In the United States, as part of the 2013 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act,information gathered by the Department of Justiceshowed that 4 out of 5 American Indian and Alaska Native women experience violence during their lifetime in the form of murder, assault, stalking and rape.

    The National Institute of Justice launched the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, at national database to get an accurate reflection of who is missing in the United states, and where. Currently, eight states have passed legislation mandating that their police all data on missing indigenous people into their mainframe. Although Montana is not one of those states, LaPlant enters the names of those missing in Montana for more than 60 days into NamUs.

    Tribal, state and national law enforcement agencies have utilized the data of NamUs to solve 358 missing person cases as of July 2019, according to the NIJ.
    Beyond awareness: Panel discusses achievements and challenges in addressing missing and murdered Indigenous people
     
  10. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    The act, which provided $1.6 billion towards investigating and prosecuting violent crimes against women, was signed by former President Bill Clinton, but expired earlier this year.

    “The Violence Against Women Act advances the fundamental and profound value that women should be free from violence wherever they are: in their homes, in their communities, in their workspace, wherever they are.” Smith said.

    The Senator is a member of the Indian Affairs Committee in Washington. In January, she sponsored the Justice for Native Survivors of Sexual Violence Act.

    “We face a crisis of Native women who’ve gone missing, murdered and affected by violence at alarmingly high rates,” said Flanagan.
    Smith, Flanagan Call To Reactivate Violence Against Women Act, Focus On Reducing Violence Against Indigenous Women
     
  11. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    I mistakenly failed to include the purpose of the study I earlier posted a link to.

    Problem and Purpose:

    Both the Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act of 2013 (Public Law 113-183) and the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-22) designate key responsibilities for addressing human trafficking to the child welfare system, including preventing, identifying, providing services, and reporting. However, better understanding of the prevalence and characteristics of minor trafficking victims is needed to guide policy and practice within criminal justice, child welfare, and juvenile justice systems. Therefore, this grant addresses the under-identifications of minor victims of sex trafficking, and the characteristics and experiences of children with investigated allegations of human trafficking.
    https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/253456.pdf
     

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