Missing Native American Women

Discussion in 'Crimes That Should Be In The News' started by Andros, Jan 22, 2019.

  1. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    Nadine Machiskinic

    https://youtu.be/gwnAfNukGYA

    New documents obtained by the Regina Leader-Post reveal it was with a good deal of reluctance and trepidation that the Regina Police Service (RPS) publicly released a report criticizing its investigation into the death of Nadine Machiskinic.

    A redacted version of the RCMP-produced report was released to the media at 4 p.m. on March 28 — the same time it was sent to the Leader-Post in response to access to information requests made simultaneously to the RPS and RCMP one month earlier.

    Just 45 minutes before that carefully planned distribution, RPS Chief Evan Bray sent an email to all staff, warning of the report’s impending release, which was being done because the RCMP had forced the RPS’s hand.

    In anticipation of the expected fallout of the critical report becoming public, Bray’s email sought to reassure staff that “we stand behind the investigation” and to encourage stoicism in the face of the expected criticism, according to documents released this week to the Leader-Post under a separate access to information request.

    “I ask for your ‘social media patience’ through this process. We WILL see keyboard warriors with opinions on news stories and articles. We can expect it will attempt to throw a cloud over our service,” wrote Bray.

    “Like everything, this will take on a life of its own for (sic) period of time and then move on to something else,” he continued. He ended the memo by generally praising staff and encouraging them to be proud of their work and the RPS. “Hold your heads high, you deserve to,” he concluded.

    https://leaderpost.com/news/crime/hold-your-heads-high-new-documents-shed-more-light-on-machiskinic-reports-release
     
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  2. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    Two years after the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center was told it would receive royalties from the critically acclaimed film "Wind River," the non-profit organization has not received a dime of the promised donations.

    The problem is not with writer/director Taylor Sheridan or production company Acacia Filmed Entertainment -- an entity of the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe in Marksville. Both ardently support NIWRC and its mission. The problem is with legal red rape revolving around film distributor The Weinstein Company’s bankruptcy and purchase by another company that was not party to TWC’s agreement to redirect its share of royalties to the Montana-based non-profit.

    The Tunica-Biloxi Economic Development Department is taking steps to address that situation by donating $50,000 to the organization. A formal check presentation is scheduled for Tuesday (Nov. 12) at the non-profit’s offices in Lame Deer, Mont.

    “We hope that through this donation, we’re not only making a small step toward putting an end to this epidemic of violence, but also sending a message to victims that they are supported,” Tunica-Biloxi Tribal Chairman Marshall Pierite said. “Tunica-Biloxi is proud to stand behind the work of this impactful organization.”

    The NIWRC is a grassroots advocacy organization dedicated to ending gender-based violence in Native American communities with educational materials and programs, direct technical assistance and development of local/national policies to strengthen tribal sovereignty.
    Tunica-Biloxi Tribe donates $50,000 to NIWRC
     
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  3. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    They appeared as the keynote speakers for the University of Montana’s three-day DiverseU symposium. The panel met on the momentum of decades of abuse and neglect. In the past 10 years, reports and personal testimony have emerged that connect missing and murdered Indigenous women to a web of violence both on and off tribal lands, and across the Northern Hemisphere.

    “It’s not a Native American problem, it’s an American problem,” said Rosalyn LaPier, a UM professor and member of the Blackfeet Tribe of Montana and Métis who facilitated the discussion.

    While documented abuse of Indigenous women in the Americas has a history going back to the arrival of Christopher Columbus, LaPier cited vigils along a stretch of road known as the “Highway of Tears” in British Columbia, and data collection by the Canadian government starting in the 1990s as the beginning of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women movement.

    In June 2019,a three-year national inquiry that included testimony from 1,500 members of the First Nations, Inuit and Métis concluded that the number of missing and murdered women in the country amounted to genocide.

    In the United States, as part of the 2013 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act,information gathered by the Department of Justiceshowed that 4 out of 5 American Indian and Alaska Native women experience violence during their lifetime in the form of murder, assault, stalking and rape.

    “You can have anecdotal stories, but sometimes those anecdotal stories don’t carry the same weight as a study,” said LaPier.

    Indigenous people who had been trying to address the epidemic for years found a national forum after the publication of this information, according to LaPier.
    Beyond awareness: Panel discusses achievements and challenges in addressing missing and murdered Indigenous people
     
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  4. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    Isabella Madrigal has written, directed and starred in a play on missing and murdered Indigenous women, won scholarships and awards for her work, including a national Girl Scout award, and spoken at the United Nations.

    Isabella Madrigal, 17, speaks about Menil and Her Heart, a play about missing and murdered indigenous women, on Aug. 23, 2019. Vickie Connor, The Desert Sun

    Her age? Seventeen.

    Madrigal, a Cahuilla Band of Indians tribal member, said her play, "Menil and Her Heart," was inspired by ancient Cahuilla stories. It follows two sisters — played by Madrigal and her real life sister, Sophia Madrigal — one of whom goes missing.

    Since bringing the play to the Dorothy Ramon Learning Center in Banning early this year, the cast has performed at the University of Redlands and Sherman Indian High School in Riverside. Upcoming performances will take place Nov. 17 at California State University, San Bernardino's Palm Desert campus and Nov. 22 at the California Genocide Conference in San Diego.
    Meet the teen directing a play about missing and murdered Indigenous women
     
  5. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    'You need to look at what is fuelling all this violence,' says Hilda Anderson-Pyrz

    An advocate for missing and murdered Indigenous people is questioning the recent announcement that Winnipeg police will be pulled from a task force assigned to cases involving vulnerable people, in order to focus on the city's recent spate of violent crime.

    "Pulling resources from an area that's really critical to bringing justice to families is very disheartening to hear," said Hilda Anderson-Pyrz, the manager of Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak's missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls unit.

    "It makes you, I would say, lose hope and question, 'Does my loved one matter?'"
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/mani...udget-resources-operational-changes-1.5354623

     
  6. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    To understand why so many Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been murdered, Nahanni Fontaine looks back on Canada’s colonial past.

    Throughout history all across the globe, Fontaine said colonial processes are marked by attacking the “space and body” of the Indigenous women, taking away their power and pushing them to feel inferior.

    “That’s no different in Canada. It was a very strategical and methodical attack on Indigenous women and girls’ bodies in order to be able to colonize,” said Fontaine, who is the NDP MLA for St. Johns in Winnipeg. She has been working with families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG) for more than 20 years.

    “When you have a colonial history that deems some people’s bodies less than and some not, inevitably the colonial violence that comes with colonization will be imparted on the bodies that are deemed less than,” she explained.

    But instead of recognizing the role history has played in putting Indigenous women and girls at risk — which Fontaine said is nothing short of genocide — many people lay blame on the families or the victims themselves for what happened to them.
    Colonialism to blame for MMIWG, not the victims: Nahanni Fontaine
     
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  7. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    I do apologize for being all over the place on the missing and murdered Native American women. I’m gonna try to slow down a bit and find a way to organize this weekend. My little granddaughter and I have talked about this common problem and she thinks it really sucks. She’s only twelve but also doesn’t understand why some people tend to gravitate to help white kids that go missing but not the same for diverse children. I have a difficult time explaining this to her as she is of my blood of course. We pass on the Oklahoma Choctaw and Cherokee race of the Five Civilized Tribes. Damn proud of it too!
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
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  8. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    It was the morning of Sept. 20, 2007 when LaPlante learned that her 78-year-old aunt Emily Osmond LaPlante was gone.

    “It was very much a shock when I received that news that morning that (my) aunt had disappeared … She just vanished,” said LaPlante, adding that her aunt lived alone in her home near Raymore, which is around 120 kilometres north of Regina.

    “How could she go missing from her safe rural home? And then it set in that this is a serious matter. She’s gone, she’s vanished and where could she go and who would take her and and why would they take her?”

    Less than four years later, she relived the nightmare with a second family member — Cody Ridge Wolfe.

    'One thing in common': Conference gathers families of MMIWG to share stories
     
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  9. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    When someone goes missing in Indian Country in the United States, chances are the family won’t turn to the police for help but to a growing community of female volunteers who work day and night to spread the word about the missing, organize scouting parties and fight to keep cold cases alive. VOA spoke with three women from separate tribes who are doing their part to safeguard their sisters and bring justice to families in mourning.

    Geneva Hadley, a member of the Comanche Nation in Oklahoma, had never heard of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Movement (MMIW) until 2016, when she and a group of fellow tribe members traveled to North Dakota to join the Standing Rock pipeline protests. She met a group there called “No More Stolen Sisters.”

    “We started talking to them, and one of the first things they told us was, ‘Watch your surroundings. Don’t go anywhere alone,’” said Hadley. The warning referenced the growing connection between transient oil workers in North Dakota’s oil fields and the trafficking and murder of Native American women.
    Native American Women Lead Fight for Missing, Murdered
     
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  10. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    An array of red dresses are displayed in the Fine Arts Gallery, hanging to bring awareness to the deaths and disappearances of indigenous women. Inspired by Jaime Black’s ReDress project, Intertribal Native Council (INC) knew last year they wanted to create an impactful event during Native American Heritage Month, the month of November, and bring awareness to these silenced issues with the Womxn Are Sacred exhibition.
    upload_2019-11-11_11-31-35.jpeg

    Acknowledging that there is an astounding amount of silence regarding these acts can be one of the first steps to getting involved. According to the Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women, there were 506 missing and murdered indigenous women cases across 71 urban cities. 280 of those were cases of murdered indigenous women and 128 were cases of missing indigenous women.

    “Indigenous issues have been really invisibilized in our society,” Parker said. “So this is one of the things people can do to help make themselves more aware of issues that are impacting one of the most marginalized communities in our country.”

    “We wanted to layer all 75 dresses on top of each other to really represent that they are an entire identity that creates that togetherness,” Begaye. “But it’s just so visual that you have to recognize it, you can’t just walk by it, you have to look at it.”
    ‘Women Are Sacred’ exhibition comes to Boise State
     
  11. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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  12. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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  13. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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  14. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    In September, LaPlant became the Montana Department of Justice’s missing persons specialist. She is a former Glacier County Sheriff’s deputy and Blackfeet law enforcement officer

    The position was created this year, after the Montana Legislature passed House Bill 21, known as “Hanna’s Act.” The bill was part of a package of legislation aimed at addressing the issue of missing and murdered indigenous people, which advocates have called an “epidemic.”

    One of her chief roles is overseeing the Montana Missing Persons Clearinghouse, a statewide database of missing persons cases. LaPlant told task force members that as of September 18th, there were a total of 179 people reported missing throughout the state, 56 of which were Native American. By November 14th, that number had dropped to 150, 31 of which were Native American.

    “There were cases on there where people knew where this missing person was,” said LaPlant. “I was able to network with local law enforcement agencies and other entities, to make sure that these people who we know where they are, are removed from the list.” She was also able to add some cases from several years ago that had never been put into the database.

    Click here to visit the Montana Missing Persons Clearinghouse website .

    Missing Indigenous Persons Task Force provides update at Great Falls meeting
     
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  15. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    “Indigenous people have suffered from historic injustices; their colonization and dispossession of their lands, their territories and resources,” Hill said paraphrasing a United Nations declaration statement on the rights of indigenous peoples.

    The Story of Marlene
    Throughout the presentation, Hill shared several stories about indigenous women who faced violence, abduction, human trafficking and other attacks. One Northern Cheyenne woman she knew, whom she referred to as “Marlene,” went missing, was found half-clothed in a Spokane alley and was taken to the hospital.

    “Marlene died,” Hill said. “No investigation, nothing in our newspapers, nothing in our TVs. Again we disappear.”

    The incident involving “Marlene” occurred four months ago.

    Some Stats
    The statistics Hill presented, from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), showed that 84.3 percent of Indian and Alaska Native women have experienced violence in their lifetime and one-third of all American Indian will be raped in their lifetime. She also showed that the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) found that, as of 2016, 5,712 American Indian and Alaskan Native women and girls were reported missing.

    One issue, Hill described, involved critical issues of tribal jurisdiction, including the Supreme Court ruling on Oliphant v. Suquamish Indian Tribe, which stated tribes have no criminal jurisdiction over non-natives. Other issues included shortage of tribal law enforcement, institutional racism, federal, FBI and U.S. Attorney’s Office often declining to prosecute, state patrol telling tribes their insurance won’t cover activities on reservation, and others. However, she later said that she has seen a change in the U.S. Attorney’s Office where they are responding to cases happening on reservations and prosecuting perpetrators.

    “We need to enhance jurisdiction over crimes of domestic violence, we need the tribe to have the ability to protect our women from crime, from violent crime and it shouldn’t depend on if the boyfriend, or the husband, what their race is; it shouldn’t depend on that,” Hill said. “It is immoral for Indian women to be left vulnerable to violence because of their abusive spouse.
    https://spokanefavs.com/missing-murdered-indigenous-women-focus-of-talk-at-gu/
     
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  16. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    Members of the task force identified and plan to address factors contributing to the high rate of missing Indigenous persons cases. Some contributing factors they discussed include: lack of funding, resources and staff for tribal law enforcement, substance abuse, behavioral health, mental health, trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, suicide and poverty.

    Unreported cases
    Though Indigenous men and women go missing at disproportionate rates, their cases are often not reported. LaPlant said that only 19 of the 31 missing Indigenous persons cases were entered into the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, or NamUs.

    “I constantly have to scour social media to see if family members are posting (about missing persons). I have found people whose family members said they were missing, but they didn’t report the case to law enforcement. It’s important that we get out into communities and understand why these cases aren’t being reported,” LaPlant said.

    Deputy Attorney General Melissa Schlichting said some people do not contact law enforcement for fear of retaliation. Iris Kill Eagle, who represents the Little Shell Nation on the task force, added that some families are reluctant to report missing people because they feel shame.
    Missing Indigenous persons task force talks community outreach, youth engagement at meeting
     
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  17. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    Montana’s new missing persons specialist is updating the state’s Missing Persons Clearinghouse by identifying cases where people have been located and adding older cases that weren’t listed.

    Misty LaPlant’s job was created by the legislature after criticism that state, federal and tribal authorities were slow to respond or coordinate efforts in cases of missing Native Americans.

    At the time, 56 of the 179 missing persons in the database, or 30 percent, were Native Americans. Native Americans make up 7 percent of the state’s population.

    With LaPlant’s updates, 35 of the 148 people listed as missing are Native Americans, or 24 percent.

    LaPlant tells Lee Newspapers of Montana she was able to clear 10 cases by contacting the state Child and Family Services Division and identifying runaway juveniles who had since been found.

    ****A former member of the Tribal Council for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians is facing more charges.

    Randy Anderson of Conehatta is already accused of defrauding a tribal government. Now the 46-year-old Choctaw faces a superceding indictment accusing him of committing an abusive sexual contact.

    A statement by U.S. Attorney Mike Hurst says Anderson entered the home of a woman on reservation lands in August and engaged in witness tampering by trying to intimidate and threaten the victim into not reporting the alleged offense. These acts allegedly violated the condition of his bond set under the initial Feb. 6 indictment.

    Anderson appeared Thursday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Linda R. Anderson for arraignment and was jailed pending a Tuesday hearing. It’s unknown if Anderson has legal representation.
    Ten things to know today: Montana updates database for MMIW
     
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  18. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    Native American women call on the U.S. Senate to renew the federal domestic violence law that expired in 2018

    ST PAUL, Minn. — Native American victim advocates are calling on the US Senate to pass the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, which expired late last year. They joined Sen. Tina Smith and Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan at the State Capitol Friday to make their case.

    "It’s hard for me to understand how it’s political, or how it’s questionable, when we live in an environment where I don’t know anyone who hasn’t experienced violence, either themselves or their immediate family, including myself," Patina Park, the president of the Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center, told reporters.

    Minnesota Task Force

    Concern over rising violence against Native American women prompted Minnesota lawmakers to take action during the 2019 session. They passed a bill that created, and fully funded, a statewide Task Force on Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women.

    One of the goals is to create better data collection, to get a better handle on the depth of the issue and the situations that put women in danger of being harmed.

    "When we don’t have accurate data on the rates of native women who are missing, who have been murdered, we can’t move forward in creating effective strategies that reduce that violence," Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, a member of the White Earth Nation, told reporters.

    "We measure what we care about, and we invest in what we measure."

    Statistics for the past three decades, compiled by the advocacy group Violence Free Minnesota, show that Native American women account for six percent of domestic violence even though they're only one percent of the state's population.

    "Domestic violence is a leading cause of homelessness for women and their children," Katie Kramer of Violence Free Minnesota said, noting that many victims lacked the resources to move away from dangerous situations.
    Violence Against Women Act bogged down
     
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  19. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    This link came up for me when I was searching for missing Native American women. Maybe someone can use it.
    JFNW Master List, Fix
     
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  20. imstilla.grandma

    imstilla.grandma ❤️ ❤️ ❤️ Believer of Miracles

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    The FBI and the Bureau of Indian Affairs have jurisdiction to lead criminal investigations on many Indian reservations but failed to report either the occurrence of these crimes or whether they were cleared through the arrest of the offenders. The Army, Navy, Air Force and Department of Defense have also failed to report to the Justice Department many thousands of homicides and other major crimes for which they had jurisdiction.
    Federal Complaint PDF:
    https://uc3f39ed9122d17d71c0ee8cfe0...bJNLUxU13lPU1QoqoGWyUraMDOnlp33rQU/file?dl=1#

    Murder Accountability Project
     
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