GUILTY MN - Justine Damond, 40, fatally shot by Minneapolis LE, 15 July 2017 #3

Discussion in 'Trials' started by Rocco, Jul 17, 2017.

  1. mickey2942

    mickey2942 Well-Known Member

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  2. ilovewings

    ilovewings Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely disgusting article, written by a small-minded cretin
     
  3. K_Z

    K_Z Verified Anesthetist

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    I have a friend who is a retired prison administrator. In MN, Noor must serve 2/3 of his sentence to be eligible for parole-- so, a little over 8 years. Friend believes with Noor's notoriety and LE background (in addition to being a targeted ethnicity in MN prisons) he will be in solitary or a protected status for much of that time.

    I still have mixed feelings about this whole case. I don't think Noor is an evil guy, and I don't think he set out to kill anyone that night-- but I do think he was a very unsuitable personality to be a LEO. He is both introverted, and instantly impulsive (from the incidents in his training file, psych profile and interviews, and the other calls he was written up for, and is being sued for). He's not the kind of personality that will be an effective, communicative, team player, if that makes sense. Introverted and impulsive is a very dangerous combination of personality qualities for anyone in a public safety position, IMO. And yet, his displays of these worrisome qualities, over and over, were dismissed, and excused, due to his "ethnicity and culture". And that kind of systemic problem remains unsolved and un-addressed, which is a public safety issue, IMO.

    My anger/ frustration is toward the diversity hiring bureaucracy that propelled a clearly unsuitable candidate toward certain (and celebrated) licensing and employment, BECAUSE of his ethnicity. I actually hold no ill will toward Noor for that process-- it's not his fault that system was put in place. Noor should have been declined for LE at a number of points along his LE journey. I hold the system responsible for assertively propelling/ forcing his candidacy into a career he was poorly suited for. He could have been, for example, a much better social services worker for his ethnic community, than a LEO. He would have benefited tremendously from several years as a supervised and mentored CSO, before determining if he should become a licensed peace officer. No one was willing to send him down those kind of paths. No one was able to tell him "no", he shouldn't be a LEO. The system pressure on trainers and administrators was too intensely propagandized, IMO, for anyone to risk saying "no". That is where a very serious internal investigation should begin, IMO.

    So, Noor has 8-12 years in prison, but the problems in the diversity hiring system that propelled an unsuitable candidate like Noor as an officer, haven't been addressed at all. I'm not sure I can interpret this outcome as "justice".
     
  4. SouthAussie

    SouthAussie Well-Known Member

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    I agree that Noor didn't set out to kill anyone. Which is why he did not get convicted of 2nd degree murder.

    However, he did act with extreme recklessness and Justine was the deceased victim due to that.

    Far too twitchy to be a police officer. They need a high degree of calmness and assuredness to carry out their functions properly.
     
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  5. SouthAussie

    SouthAussie Well-Known Member

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    This shouldn't be about Noor being treated unfairly. It should be about making all police officers responsible for reckless behaviour that results in a murder.

    Every cop who directly kills an unarmed citizen who poses no real threat should be treated the same way as Noor. Perhaps if a few caucasian cops had been, this would not have become an issue.

    Anyone can say that they thought their life/their partner's life was in peril. Prosecutors/judges/other police need to see past that to the truth.

    A close-to-impeccable police force is important. Those that don't fit that bill need to be weeded out. Prior to an unwarranted murder, preferably. Afterwards, if necessary.
     
  6. ilovewings

    ilovewings Well-Known Member

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    How many more Noors are out there? That is what should scare all of us
     
  7. MsFacetious

    MsFacetious What a Kerfuffle...

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    The race issue came in the beginning as far as I'm concerned. When he was hired despite all the warning signs and red flags that said otherwise. That's the only time I see race being an issue in this case at all.

    I fully believe this sentence and verdict were fair and correct. I also believe it would have been the same regardless of the defendants gender or complexion.

    Basically, what K_Z said.
     
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  8. ilovechili

    ilovechili Well-Known Member

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    I could never put this as well as you did here. This speaks for me too and is exactly how I feel. An exceptional post.
     
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  9. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

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    How jury was convinced to deliver guilty verdict against ex-cop who shot Australian woman
    He had claimed he fired to protect his partner, who he said had been unable to get his gun out of his holster.
    But prosecutor Amy Sweasy said she did not believe that version of events.
    "First of all, Officer Harrity didn't share that opinion," she said.
    "He was asked that also, if he had trouble getting it out."
    Moments after the shooting, another officer's body cam recorded Officer Harrity claiming that he had his gun out but did not fire before Noor shot Ms Ruszczyk.
    "It could not have been that Harrity's story and Noor's story were accurate because they were both so different, which in the end, is often what criminal trials come down to," Ms Sweasy said

    https://www.9news.com.au/national/a-current-affair-justine-ruszczyk-mohamed-noor-murder-jail-us-prosecutors-speak-latest-news-australia/1e5508d2-b106-4015-b547-28981875c8ca
     
  10. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

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  11. mickey2942

    mickey2942 Well-Known Member

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    Imagine Harrity, hearing a gun going off right next to him, and if he had moved, he may very well had been shot. And the poor guy is nailed into basically saying nothing, because if he did, he would be crossing "the blue line".
     
  12. MsFacetious

    MsFacetious What a Kerfuffle...

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    He won't be absent. He just won't be in the home.
    He will be far more present in his son's life than Justine ever will be in anyone's.
    He should be grateful that Harrity wasn't equally jumpy. He could have ended up shot too.
     
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  13. RubyHill

    RubyHill Well-Known Member

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    Noor offered an apology to the family for Justine's death in court.
    "The apology is inappropriate. It doesn't bring back my daughter," John Ruszczyk told 7.30.
    "I don't want him to spend too much time in jail if my daughter is around, but my daughter is not around.
    "So under those circumstances, he has to pay a penalty."

    Despite not accepting the apology, Mr Ruszczyk spoke publicly for the first time since the court case and said he was pleased with the outcome.

    Father of Justine Ruszczyk rejects apology from cop who murdered her
     
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  14. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

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  15. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

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    Mr Ruszczyk said the incident had affected his family so much that his partner, Marion Hefferen, almost ran away when two plain-clothed detectives turned up at a local charity on Sydney's northern beaches with guns exposed several months after the murder.
    "One of her colleagues had to go and comfort her and calm her down,” he said.
    “When she came back, the officers were standing there and they had their hands up.
    "They said, ‘we can assure you this would not have happened in Australia’.”

    Father of Justine Ruszczyk rejects apology from cop who murdered her
     
  16. they'll get you

    they'll get you CHRIS. P. BACON

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    Looking at this report, Harrity thought he'd been shot!
    It says Justine was standing approx. two feet from his door, so Noor must have had his gun outside Harritty's window to have shot Justine in the abdomen.
    IMO Noor has got what he deserved. What a reckless, crazy thing to do. What a waste of a beautiful life. Relive your actions every day and every night Noor.


    With Officer Noor in the passenger seat, Officer Harrity pulled into the alleyway behind Damond’s house with the patrol car’s headlights deactivated, and removed the safety hood from the holster of his duty weapon.

    He said that he heard a dog barking as he neared Damond’s home, and that he slowed the vehicle to two miles per hour, but never stopped.


    Approximately two minutes later, the officers approached the end of the alley, and waited for a bicyclist to pass as they cleared from the call.

    Officer Harrity said that moments later, he heard a voice and a thump towards the rear of the patrol car, and then “caught a glimpse of a person’s head and shoulder’s outside his window.”

    He said that the person, later identified as Damond, was approximately two feet away, and that he could not see her hands, and did not know if she had any weapons.

    The startled officer recalled having said, “Oh s**t,” or “Oh Jesus,” and grabbed for his duty weapon, believing his life was in danger. He said he drew the weapon and held it to his rib cage, pointed downwards.

    Officer Harrity said that he then heard a noise “that sounded like a light bulb dropping on the floor, and saw a flash.”

    After checking to see if he had been shot, Officer Harrity said he realized that Officer Noor’s right arm was extended towards him, and that Damond was standing outside the driver’s side window with her hands on the left side of her abdomen, covering a gunshot wound.
    https://defensemaven.io/bluelivesma...-he-knew-he-was-wrong-9mLFLYce60613SXlTWrkhg/
     
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  17. RubyHill

    RubyHill Well-Known Member

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    A US judge has approved the record $28 million payout to the family and lawyers of murdered Australian life coach Justine Ruszczyk, with her brother receiving $8 million and father $7 million.
    Ms Ruszczyk, 40, was shot dead by Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor in 2017 after she called 911 to report a possible rape in an alley behind her home.
    Noor was found guilty in a Minneapolis court in April of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter and was sentenced to 12.5-years' prison.

    The family filed a $71 million ($US50 million) civil lawsuit last year and just days after Noor was found guilty by the jury in the criminal trial the city of Minneapolis agreed to pay $28 million ($US20 million).


    Justine's family to split multi-million dollar payout
     
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  18. ilovewings

    ilovewings Well-Known Member

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    Seeing her beautiful face and the photograph of her and the man she was going to
    marry, brings back all the sadness and horror of what happened to her. No amount
    of money will ever be enough to compensate for the grief and sadness her family and fiance will have for the rest of their lives, but having the police pay millions of dollars is the only punishment we have to send a message to the offender, and hope against hope that the police department can learn from this horror.
     
  19. Pi Thoughts

    Pi Thoughts Well-Known Member

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    Breaking News.........
    The US policeman who shot dead Sydney woman Justine Ruszczyk has lodged an appeal.
    Lawyers for Mohamed Noor have filed an appeal on behalf of the former Minneapolis police officer in the Minnesota Court of Appeals.
    Former US cop lodges appeal over Justine Ruszczyk shooting
     
  20. mickey2942

    mickey2942 Well-Known Member

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    Big surprise. They were probably working on the appeal during the trial. Noor is in his cushy private prison cell, with a tv, library books, probably a computer, to help write his appeal, of course.

    At least he isn't out on bond. Noor can do eight years in a heartbeat. He will still be alive. He will probably get some deal in four years, time served, good behavior, whatever.
     
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