Identified! MO - McDonald Co., 'Grace Doe' Fem Skeletal 784UFMO, 21-31, Dec'90 - Shawna Beth Garber

Discussion in 'Identified!' started by CarlK90245, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. Bit of hope

    Bit of hope Have a nice day!

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    What ever happened to the suggestion further up in the thread of Frankie Viola Hurst?
    Frankie Viola Hurst - South Carolina Missing Person Directory
    Circumstances:
    Frankie was last heard from on Mothers Day 1989 when she called her adopted mother. Frankie had traveled from South Carolina to Kansas with a female friend (name unknown.) She called her brother in Harrisonburg, VA to see if they could stay with him for a few days before going back to SC. Her friend, Bob/Robert in Kansas who she and her friend had been staying with, had been on the road (as a truck driver) and when he returned, her mother in SC called him and he told her that Frankie and her friend had already headed back. No communication with any family member has been made since then.
     


  2. sketchyjen33

    sketchyjen33 Well-Known Member

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    this is a long shot but what about Theresa Fischbach. She was from St. Charles (about 4 hours away) and was supposedly moving to Spring, TX to stay with a boyfriend. Could something have happened when she was traveling back at some point? I know that the dates are a little off but some small details line up and I don't see where she has been ruled out.

    The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs)
     
  3. sketchyjen33

    sketchyjen33 Well-Known Member

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    Heard back from McDonald Sheriff about matching Grace Doe and Theresa Fischbach. Unfortunately, not a match. Back to the drawing board....
     
  4. GFPD216

    GFPD216 New Member

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    Greetings, my name is Kenen Martinez, I’m Detective Lorie Martinez-Howard’s son and a former McDonald County Deputy in my own right (verification pending).

    I’ll check with her if she knows if DNA was ever put in. She still follows the case and puts in some work as a private citizen on it.
     
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  5. GFPD216

    GFPD216 New Member

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    D.N.A. is on file at University of North Texas.
     
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  6. Bit of hope

    Bit of hope Have a nice day!

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    Welcome @GFPD216 Good to have you here. Thank you for the additional info and your mother for all the hard work. Would you be so kind to find out if Jane Doe ever gave birth/if this was looked into. I would be very useful ruling people in or out.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019
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  7. JustACatMom

    JustACatMom Member

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    If Grace really was held for an extended period of time, do we know how long the farmhouse had been abandoned? Also, who previously/currently owned it?
    I know there is a 6-year time difference, but if she was held, could it be Donna Kingston?
    She met a man that was supposed to take her to Tulsa to find work. He could have easily taken her the other direction towards Missouri. The hair and teeth are similar. Being held captive, especially for a long period of time she would have lost weight. With weight loss and aging, I think she could look very similar to the sketch and reconstruction of Grace.
     

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  8. Bit of hope

    Bit of hope Have a nice day!

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  9. bjhoward

    bjhoward Member

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    Cold Case Getting New Looks

    STORY:

    Local and national investigators are hoping that people passionate about cracking open a 30-year-old case in McDonald County will do their part.


    A Texas-based lab, Othram, is now taking on the case and hopes to secure funding for its work. The move means new light might be shed on an old case. In some 20-to 30-year cold cases, investigators "have exhausted sometimes tens of thousands of dollars," Olivia Ytterberg, Othram social impact manager, said.


    Stay connected and informed with McDonald County Press news updates delivered straight to your inbox.


    Sometimes, those officials feel they have unearthed every option they have. This gives investigators a leg up.


    "We want to solve every case we can," Ytterberg said.


    The story of "Grace" Doe is complicated.


    "Grace" Doe's body was discovered on Dec. 2, 1990, near an abandoned farmhouse on Oscar Talley Road, between Lanagan and Pineville, according to reports. A couple collecting cans discovered her remains. Her killer utilized six different types of cord and clothesline for bondage, Ytterberg said. The six different types of cord included military cord that was not available to the public in 1990, reports said.


    Investigators believe Doe was raped before being strangled.


    Some reports say that people recall hearing a woman scream and the loud sounds of a truck engine about a week before Halloween that year.


    Records indicate that Doe's dental work "was not normal for that time frame in that area," Ytterberg added. That's why some believe Doe could be a resident of the four-state area, rather than the local area.


    Approximately two months before the body's remains were discovered, a local 10-year-old boy tried to tell his parents about a body he saw. His parents, however, thought he had an overactive imagination and his comments were dismissed. Had they come forward at that time, it could have had a different outcome, Ytterberg said.


    The age-old mystery has perplexed local authorities, who have worked tirelessly for three decades to connect the dots and bring the killer to justice.


    Doe was dubbed "Grace," thanks to a former investigator, who said the case would be solved "by the grace of God."


    As Othram staffers launch into the case, officials say people can contribute in a variety of ways: monetarily; by sharing the case online; and/or uploading DNA to be stored in the lab to help cases.


    Othram's price tag for analyzing DNA in the Grace Doe case is $5,000.

    The lab is the only one in the nation that conducts the entire process in-house. Lab personnel use DNA enrichment, modern genome sequencing and genealogy.


    Sometimes, only trace amounts of degraded or contaminated materials are available for analysis.


    People who contribute their DNA help build a broader bank of matches. That can help narrow down the victim or the assailant, Ytterberg said.


    Part of the process entails building a family tree. The more information available helps provide that connection, Ytterberg said. People are able to submit their DNA and upload that information, through a site such as DNASolve.com.


    Groups of people throughout the country are personally motivated to help solve cases. Through websites such as WebSleuths.com, people follow cases on true crime discussion forums.


    Othram, based in The Woodlands, has helped solve various cases around the country. Some cases, due to their "popularity" and the facts known, have a following of people who want the case solved. For instance, a case involving a hiker found in Florida was funded in one week, Ytterberg said.


    Another case in Texas also was funded in a week, but the local police department contributed to the funds, she added.


    Another case -- involving a young man found on the beach in Galveston -- has not garnered a lot of interest because there aren't a lot of details yet, Ytterberg said.


    Othram utilizes "proprietary techniques" as well as a genealogy process to solve some cold cases that once seemed impossible to crack.


    A body found in the state of Washington was submerged underwater for five to six years. "He was found in 1994 and the last contact he had with his family was around 1987," Ytterberg said.


    Lab officials, however, were able to achieve success.


    Ytterberg admits that sometimes DNA can be too degraded to crack the case. However, officials work hard -- sometimes, performing more than one "enrichment process" -- to make inroads, she said.


    The analysis process differs per case. Because evidence's degradation and contamination vary, each case is "very different in terms of turnaround time," Ytterberg said.


    McDonald County Sheriff Michael Hall believes teaming up with Othram could bring closure for the family involved.


    Othram officials reached out to Hall, seeing the case on a website, and inquired about helping. Additional submissions of DNA and monetary donations will boost the cause, he said.


    A DNA test on the books at the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification, which has been there for some time, is compared against missing or deceased people's DNA, he said. The forensic unit offers screening and DNA testing for criminal investigations.


    Having additional DNA with which to compare, could help shed light on the victim's identify, Hall said. If a relative or cousin has matching DNA, that could help identify Grace, Hall said.


    DNA has been compared to missing people from California to the East Coast, Hall said. This method, though, adds a broader base of comparison and could help identify Grace's family member, he said.


    "To just identify her would be great," Hall said. "It would be immensely important, and great to get her back to her family."


    The McDonald County Sheriff's Office will aid Othram by sharing information on social media about the crowdfunding campaign and ongoing investigation, he added.


    The 30-year-old disturbing and callous cold case is challenging. Numerous people have worked for years, trying to bring it to finality.


    Ytterberg said people providing DNA, monetary donations -- and any information -- could shed some light on this poor victim's identity and a potential killer.


    "I would love to see this case solved," she said.


    For more information, or to make a donation, visit https://dnasolves.com/articles/grace_doe/ or DNASolves.com.


    Growing curiosity in cold case development, thanks to covid-19, may offer investigators more eyes on old facts.


    Television shows and an increased online media presence have always attracted people’s interest in cold cases, Olivia Ytterberg, Othram social impact manager, said.


    That trend has become stronger over the past decade, as more and more people have followed tracks gone cold. Various websites exist where people share information, leads and conjecture.


    The current global health pandemic, however, has created a gap in which people have more time on their hands. People working — or not working — from their homes are utilizing those extra hours to serve as their own sleuths.


    “People are really interested and these cases really resonate with them. They want to do what they can,” Ytterberg said.


    “People are very passionate about these cases and want to help solve them.”


    Home-based sleuths seek out websites and online true crime discussion forums to research and follow cold cases throughout the years. Now, with extra time on their hands, more people have become interested in seeing what they can dig up, Ytterberg said.


    “Covid has definitely helped people delve into unsolved mysteries,” she said.


    “People are interested in giving them their name back.”
     
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  10. Bit of hope

    Bit of hope Have a nice day!

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    YESSSS! This is very good news! I hope the funding will go smooth.
     
  11. othram

    othram Verified Owner of Othram Inc/DNA Expert

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    Thanks, we are looking forward to helping.
     
  12. othram

    othram Verified Owner of Othram Inc/DNA Expert

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  13. Bit of hope

    Bit of hope Have a nice day!

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    Yes!! This is great.
     
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  14. bjhoward

    bjhoward Member

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    Press release today from McDonald County (MO) Sheriff's Office:

    10/23/2020

    Located in the southwestern most county in Missouri, Oscar Talley Road is a two-mile dirt drive through the rural farmlands of McDonald County. On December 2, 1990, a couple walking the road discovered the decomposed remains of a young woman not far from the road. She had been hog-tied and was dumped behind a rural farmhouse.

    Nicknamed "Grace Doe" by Detective Lori Howard in the 2000's, she believed it was only by the Grace of God that the young woman's identity would be found. Her autopsy revealed that she had been raped and strangled approximately two months prior to her discovery. Grace Doe was found restrained with six different types of bindings: nylon and lead ropes, coaxial and telephone cables, paracord, and clothesline. Investigations determined that the paracord was military grade MIL-C-5040H type II - a rope that was exclusively sold to the military in the 1990’s - but without more information, her case went cold.

    Grace Doe is described as of White or Native American descent, 21-31 years old, standing 5’1’’- 5’4’’ tall and weighing around 120 pounds. She had shoulder length, dark auburn hair. She was wearing a denim jacket with a white t-shirt, “Lee” brand blue jeans, and white high-top tennis shoes.

    While investigators initially thought that Grace Doe and her abductor were from the area, they now believe that this is not the case. Grace had extensive dental work that was not normal for the rural county of McDonald in the 1990’s, leading them to believe she was from a bigger city in the four-state area. As Oscar Talley Road is located less than a mile from current Interstate 49 (71 Highway at the time), authorities contend that Grace Doe was abducted elsewhere and dumped on the rural dirt road. She is McDonald County’s only unidentified body.

    The McDonald County Sheriff’s Office has partnered with Othram to use advanced DNA testing and forensic genealogy to establish an identification of, or to find the closest living relatives to the decedent. Anyone with information that could aid the investigation is encouraged to contact the McDonald County Sheriff’s Office at (417) 223-4319. A fund has been established to cover the costs of testing for this case. This case is logged in NamUs as UP5321.

    Sheriff Michael Hall
     
  15. Rollsballs

    Rollsballs Active Member

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    Couple things... when using ropes, its best to use the same type rope for each job.. specific to the task small rope for small jobs bigger rope for heavy duty jobs...etc..I see a mix of rope the longest looks to be used for duck decoys and trot lines for fishing. Looking at all that different ropes, looks like my climbing/harness box for working on roofs. A bunch of different ropes for different task at different lengths. I due tend to believe a couple things.. the rope looks to be un-cut and way long for the task.. which makes tying things securely difficult. Which tends to make a person bad at tying knots grab some more rope and put more knots to help secure their poor rope skills. So I thinking it was a young male, most older men could make good knots, and the rope might have already been at the farm in a shed. Not brought specifically thinking it would be used. The shoes look to be a cheaper knock off of the popular Reebok fitness model of the time. Not sure.. Payless or walmart were popluar at that time locally.
     
  16. dotr

    dotr Well-Known Member

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    Why were so many different types of binding used, did the perp clean out somebody's garage or was the victim murdered in one? speculation.
    McDonald Co. Sheriff hopes to identify 1990 cold case victim | 5newsonline.com
    ''MCDONALD COUNTY, Mo. — McDonald County Sheriff’s Office (MCSO) has partnered with Othram forensic lab in hopes of finding a 1990s cold case victim’s closest living relative.''

    ''She was found restrained with nylon and lead ropes, coaxial and telephone cables, paracord and clothesline. Her autopsy revealed that she had been raped and strangled approximately two months prior to being discovered.''

    ''Grace is McDonald County’s only unidentified body.

    Anyone with information that could help the investigation is encouraged to contact MCSO at (417) 223-4319.''
     
  17. bjhoward

    bjhoward Member

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    After reading through this thread again, I think @JustACatMom has a found a really interesting potential match for Grace Doe in Donna Kingston.

    Both women were Native American, around the sames age and have similar builds. Both women also had a history of ortho care, including braces. Donna also had protruding upper front teeth, which seems to match with some profile photos of Grace Doe's skull.

    Authorities have Grace Doe's dental records, so if Donna's dental records exist somewhere, I would think a comparison should be possible.
     
  18. othram

    othram Verified Owner of Othram Inc/DNA Expert

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    We are running a campaign for the next week to try to bring attention and funding to this case. More details here: Othram Inc..
     
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  19. othram

    othram Verified Owner of Othram Inc/DNA Expert

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    An update: Southeast Missouri State University Anthropology has teamed up with us to provide anthropology resources and financial support for the case. Thanks to the university, we are now 87% funded. Almost there!

    Who is McDonald County Grace Doe?
     
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  20. nelsonfan24

    nelsonfan24 Member

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