NM NM - Albert Jennings Fountain, 57, White Sands, 1 Feb 1896

Discussion in 'Pre-1960's Missing' started by Richard, Sep 4, 2007.

  1. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    Albert Jennings Fountain
    Missing since February 1, 1896 from White Sands, Dona Ana County, New Mexico
    Classification: Endangered Missing

    Vital Statistics
    Date Of Birth: October 23, 1838
    Age at Time of Disappearance: 57 years old

    Circumstances of Disappearance
    Albert Jennings Fountain and his eight-year-old son Henry, were last seen in White Sands, New Mexico on February 1, 1896.

    According to Wikipedia, "Fountain became a leading figure in the Republican Party in New Mexico, serving a term in the state legislature. Unfortunately, he would acquire numerous political enemies, which probably was the reason behind his mysterious disappearance."

    The journey was to take three-to-four days (140 miles) and began in Lincoln, New Mexico, which is in the pass between El Capitan Mountains to the north and Sacramento Mountains to the south. It led southwest, through the Sacramento Mountains to the village of Tularosa. From there, it turned south to the hamlet of La Luz. It then bore southwest for 40 miles southwest across the basin, a desert grass- and shrubland, past the spectacular dunes called White Sands and a gypsum-laced rise called Chalk Hill. It ascended San Augustine Pass, between the Organ and San Augustine Mountains, then descended the western flanks of the mountains, passing through the mining community of Organ. As it drew near the Rio Grande river valley, it passed through Las Cruces and then, home in Mesilla.

    Two search parties, one of them led by Fountain’s son, helped by two Mescalero Apache scouts, "began piecing together the evidence as the sun rose over the Sacramento Mountains, on the eastern horizon. They found where a man had knelt and fired from behind a growth of shrubs, leaving shell casings on the ground. They discovered the site where two men had tended three horses.

    They followed wagon tracks and discovered a pool of blood. One man discovered a blood-soaked handkerchief with a nickel and a dime tied carefully in its corner. They followed the wagon tracks of the buckboard and the hoof tracks of six horses east for some 12 miles, into sand dunes west of a small and isolated mountain range called the Jarillas. There, they discovered the carriage, which had been plundered and abandoned. "

    Ollie Reed, Jr. of the Albuquerque Tribune in an article on May 25, 2001 refers to the fact that in 1900, charred bones were found in an unmarked grave in the Sacramento Mountains. It is not known if these were the remains of Albert or Henry Fountain.


    Investigators
    If you have any information concerning this case, please contact: The Doe Network

    Source Information:
    Colonel Albert Jennings Fountain
    Handbook of Texas Online: Albert Jennings Fountain
    Murders of Albert Jennings Fountain
    Albert Jennings Fountain - Wikipedia
    The Doe Network: Case File 3413DMNM

    LINK:
    http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/3413dmnm.html
     
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  3. Angie4b1g

    Angie4b1g New Member

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    Now that's a cold case!
     
  4. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but I understand that they have their best man on it.
     
  5. Angie4b1g

    Angie4b1g New Member

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  6. anthrobones

    anthrobones New Member

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    Think they'll find him?
     
  7. Rle7

    Rle7 New Member

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    On Feb. 1, 1896, Doña Ana County Assistant District Attorney Albert Fountain, and his eight year old son Henry, were returning from court in Lincoln to their home in Mesilla. Somewhere along the trail, they disappeared and were presumed murdered. To this day, their bodies have never been found.

    Without a doubt, the Fountain murder is the most famous cold case in New Mexico history.

    In the year prior to his disappearance, Fountain was acting as special prosecutor in Socorro County. Through his efforts, numerous cattle rustlers in western Socorro County, specifically operating from Horse Springs to Quemado, were apprehended, tried and sentenced to prison. The trials were held in the Socorro County courthouse.

    In mid-1895, Fountain moved on to Lincoln County to investigate and arraign a ring of shady cattle barons. On Feb. 1, 1896, Fountain had received indictments against several suspected cattle rustlers, including well-known cattle baron Oliver Lee. Following the proceedings, Fountain and his son took the road from Lincoln back to Mesilla through the White Sands area. They never arrived home.

    The next day, Fountain's buckboard wagon was found abandoned on the road. Nearby were two pools of blood, several spent bullet casings, and some of his legal papers — not found were Albert Fountain or his son.

    Sheriff Pat Garrett, who was famous for having killed Billy the Kid, was given the case. The governor even offered an award and hired the Pinkerton Detective Agency to help find the killers.

    http://www.dchieftain.com/news/79860-05-03-08.html
     
  8. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    PFF New Member

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  10. Richard

    Richard Well-Known Member

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    PFF New Member

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