NY - NJ Woman dies in fall from Oculus escalator

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Indy Anna, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. Indy Anna

    Indy Anna Active Member

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    Terribly sad! :(

    snipped

    http://nypost.com/2017/02/11/woman-falls-to-her-death-at-world-trade-centers-oculus/
     
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  3. Lilibet

    Lilibet Watching and Waiting

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  4. carole

    carole Active Member

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  5. al66pine

    al66pine New Member

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    carole TY very much for ^ post. From ^ link.

    "A New Jersey woman ... was apparently horsing around on the handrail, mimicking a superhero before she lost her balance.... video ... victim Jenny Santos, 29, fell 34 feet .... after laying prone on the banister of the escalator, like she was pretending to be flying, the source said.
    "Seconds later, Santos lost her balance and plunged from the street level to the C1 level on the main concourse, where she hit her head on the marble floor, ...
    " ...guardrails at the Oculus ... are 3 feet, 4 inches tall.
    " ^ bbm

    Photo of escalator & guardrail at link. I wonder if vid will be released. Now we can see how/why she fell per "source."

    Sad, sad, sad.
     
  6. Lilibet

    Lilibet Watching and Waiting

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    No judgement. It's still tragic. A night of partying probably explains the "horsing around." But what a waste. She sounded like a great gal in the original article. Sad, sad, sad. :(

    Tragic twins Jenny and Jessica Santos, 29, had been heading for a PATH train home to Kearny, NJ at 5:30 a.m. Saturday morning after a night of partying in the city, law enforcement sources told The Post.

    http://nypost.com/2017/02/11/woman-falls-to-her-death-at-world-trade-centers-oculus/
     
  7. Indy Anna

    Indy Anna Active Member

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    BBM Of the incident? Oh, I certainly hope not. Just thinking about it sends chills up and down my spine. Since I was a kid, I've been wary of escalators because 1.) I'm terrified of heights and 2.) I'm uncoordinated. As my coordination has deteriorated along with the condition of my spine over the years, I've become nervous just going up and down the stairs in my home. A number of years ago I went shopping at a mall with my mother and sister. I can't remember now how we got to an upper floor -- I'm thinking the escalator wasn't as intimidating going up -- but I could not bring myself to step foot on the down escalator. We were a good distance from the elevators and too much walking is painful for me, but I opted to endure the pain to take the elevator rather than the escalator. A recurring nightmare I have involves trying to exit a building when I keep coming upon stairs that appear to have been designed by Escher.

    Something like this is what nightmares are made of. I can't imagine (it terrifies me to try) the horror Jenny must have felt. In a way, I hope she wasn't cognizant of what was happening (OTOH, it likely wouldn't have happened if she was cognizant). My heart goes out to Jessica who not only experienced the horror of her beloved sister's awful death, but will probably re-live it everyday in her mind. My heart also goes out to the bystanders who watched helplessly as Jenny fell to her death.
     
  8. al66pine

    al66pine New Member

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    I tried to picture how - as first reported - reaching for a falling hat resulted in going over 3'4" railing. OTOH, as per later MSM link, if someone climbed up to lay prone/horizontal on handrail, on her stomach, arms forward, like Superman 'flying' thru the air, staying balanced on such a skinny horizontal surface would be difficult. {ETA: And if person flying on handrail loses balance, then 'stuff happens' (like gravity). Sadly, she fell on the 'wrong' side so it was 30+ft to lower level, instead of falling just 3'4" to floor.} As you said, lack of cognizance. Cause? IDK.

    If the source described her actions accurately, someone w wobbly ankles, wonky spine, and/or poor coordination would not get into a position like that, so would not suffer a fall like that. That's why I wondered about vid.
    I'm sorry, walking is painful for you and escalators are difficult/impossible. I can only imagine or try to. Did not mean to cause any offense. Years back a friend said she had an escalator phobia - both up and down - because she had no 'foot-eye coordination.'

    From your post: "... nightmare ... stairs that appear to have been designed by Escher..." I want to stay away from those M.C. Escher staircases too - both asleep and awake.

    RIP, Jenny Santos. Thoughts & prayers to your family, friends, & community.



    .
     
  9. JohnPaul

    JohnPaul Former Member

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    i have seen video of the incident......

    very sad but no sympathy from me......
     
  10. Indy Anna

    Indy Anna Active Member

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    No offense taken, al66pine. I just wanted to make sure I understood what is in the video you spoke of so I can avoid it. The way I imagined it is the way you described. My imagination (and dreams) are scary enough! :eek:

    People in the Daily News commented on how escalators might be made safer, but IMO no modifications or safety features can make anything 100% safe.
     
  11. flourish

    flourish Active Member

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    1) I am glad to know I'm not the only person scared of going down escalators. Seriously. I can do it if it's short or I'm not rushed and can literally talk myself through it. I'm pretty coordinated but just fear them.
    2) She was 29, not 9. That was a stupid, dangerous thing to do and she should have known better.

    It's awful and tragic and avoidable. You can't regulate common sense... Or lack thereof... She was possibly very sensible when sober, but this... Ugh.. Her poor twin.
     
  12. Lilibet

    Lilibet Watching and Waiting

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    Just to add to the escalator discussion...I don't like going down either and I don't like stepping on and off at either end, going up or down. I really have to concentrate. One time I had just gotten on the down escalator and a little boy pushed the button to make it stop. I could have fallen easily with the lurch or hurt my already bad back. Needless to say, I was not pleasant to the employee who came to deal with it or the mother or the little boy. Why the button was accessible to a curious child, I have no idea.
     
  13. al66pine

    al66pine New Member

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    sbm ^. Agreeing ---
    1. some modifications could make escalators safer and
    2. nothing can be made 100% safe.

    IIUC and not saying I do understand, the issue was not safety of escalator or escalator movement. IIUC, the woman was on a cantilevered 'balcony' between two escalators- w 3'4" guardrail - overhanging a lobby-ish area. She climbed onto guardrail to lay on handrail & mimic flying, and then lost her balance & fell to the level underneath.

    Gravity at work. Classic case.

    IIUC, if the escalators had instead been two (static) stairways w a cantilevered 'balcony' between them, the same thing could have happened. Gravity. Ditto someone in a third story apt climbing onto handrail of balcony to 'fly' and falling off. Gravity. Not a prob w escalator, but 'problem' w gravity, IIUC.
    ^ my impression from nypost pic; I could be waaaaaaay wrong. From someone who trips over own feet. :gaah:A lot. :facepalm:
     

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