Peanut ban in school?

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Floh, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. Floh

    Floh Former Member

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    HARTFORD, Conn.*--A 6-year-old's extreme allergy is pitting concerns about the boy's safety against the right of his schoolmates to enjoy an American classic -- a peanut butter sandwich.

    A nationwide increase in peanut allergies is prompting a debate playing out in his small elementary school in Seymour and across the country. But while some school districts have decided to bar anyone from bringing peanut products to school, Seymour and others say such rules are unfair to the rest of the students.
    "I think more and more people are looking for protection from cradle to grave, and I really don't believe that's what society is all about," said Seymour school board member James Garofolo. "I really don't believe we can protect people ... from all the things out there that may pose harm to them."

    Continued: http://www.boston.com/news/local/co...gies_spark_debate_over_peanut_bans_in_school/


    I don't believe there should be a peanut ban in schools. people shouldn't controlled in this manner. what's next to be banned?

    and what is causing this 'nationwide increase in peanut allergies' btw?

    please excuse me if you think me callous.
     
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  3. Paladin

    Paladin Former Member

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    No, I agree. Where would you draw the line when it comes to food allergies? Pretty soon kids wouldn't be able to eat anything at all in school.

    I think the best course of action would be to try to educate the children on food allergies if there is a child in the school or class. Stuff like...don't offer any peanut snacks to this kid etc. Also, if the kid is allergic enough to peanuts that he can't even be within smelling range, then perhaps it would be best to isolate this kid for his own safety.

    Floh...I wish I knew more about what causes the peanut allergy thing too...but I heard somewhere that sometimes kids will develop allergies to certain foods while they're in their mother's womb, especially if the mother has been eating alot of that particular food during pregnancy.
     
  4. fundiva

    fundiva New Member

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    I don't know what's causing the increase in peanut allergies, but I do know it should be a concern in schools and everywhere. I have two nephews, same family, two years apart in age. They both have allergies to all nuts, including peanuts. Just playing with a child that has handled peanuts or a product with peanuts in it is dangerous for them. They went to a t-ball match and one of them ended up having a reaction because the kid he was playing with had peanut butter crackers before coming to the game. My sister has to pull out an Epipen and give him a shot immediately and get them to the doctor. If schools do not want to ban these products or peanuts then they should have the staff trained to handled the situation immediately. In my area a 12 year old girl went to a street fair with her mother. She had a peanut allergy and was very careful about what she ate. She bought a candied apple and was told it had not been around peanut products. Unfortunately, it had been rubbed with peanut "oil" when it was made to give it a shine. She had an immediate reaction, was given an Epipen, an ambulance took her to the hospital, but she did die from it. I think it is a concern and if the school isn't able to handle the responsibility of treating or the possible death of a child, then they need to consider banning the products. JMOO.
     
  5. eve

    eve New Member

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    Did anyone see the Law and Order show (I think) about this? Based on truth, I believe. As a teacher I was interested. The teacher had a very rigid routine as regards lunches because of a child's severe peanut allergy. She was at her desk eating lunch while the kids ate theirs and apparently a student gave the afflicted student a candy bar that had peanuts in it and she didn't see this happen. The kid didn't even eat it, just opened it, and died of anaphylactic (sp.?) shock. The teacher was on trial for negligent homicide. The parents were rabid in their condemnation of the teacher.

    Too much, imo. If a child is THAT sensitive, no amount of special care could insure safety. I deeply resent the load teachers must carry these days. Why we do the job, I often wonder.

    Eve
     
  6. Paladin

    Paladin Former Member

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    I have a story too. My former manager's child has an allergy to peanuts, so they are VERY careful when it comes to exposing any nuts to him. She has two sets of pans, two sets of everything that are clearly labeled so none of the oils from the nuts got anywhere near him.

    A few years ago during Christmas or Thanksgiving they invited over her sister and a friend of the sister. She brought a pie. As always, the mother asked if there were any traces of nuts in the pie, or made in a tin that was near nuts. The friend answered no, as she had made the pie herself. Sure enough, the kid bites into the pie and starts swelling up immediately. He's scared out of his mind (he was like 7 years old) and they get out the eppi-pen and take him to the hospital. Luckily he lived, but it turns out the "friend" actually bought the pie from the store and tried to pass it off as her own! Boy was my manager pissed. She said she nearly killed this woman.
     
  7. fundiva

    fundiva New Member

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    I think that most people don't know the severity of these allergies. They were almost non-existent when I went to school. It isn't just an allergy that you get a little rash from, this is serious stuff. It's amazing how much stuff has nuts in it or has been in contact with nuts or made in a facility that has nuts. None of these items can be eaten if you have a severe nut allergy. Most people don't read the ingredients and know whether or not the chocolate (or other food item) they used in a dish is okay or if it was made in a facility that also had nuts. So it's almost impossible for the mother or the kids to know what is in most items. My little nephews are very good about it, but during Christmas they were not allowed some of the items that were made. He made the comment that peanuts and peanut butter must be delicious because everybody eats it. Think of how much these kids cannot do because of their allergy. My sister can't take them out to most restaurants. They don't get to go on many playdates because the parents haven't and won't de-peanut their houses. They thought t-ball was safe. They still are involved but they have their own bats, etc. and use a lot of wipes. They don't get to go to birthday or other parties because of the threat, or, if they do, they can't usually eat the food.
     
  8. jilly

    jilly Registered User

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    Ironically, as I spotted this thread, I'm sitting here eating peanut butter & toast.

    I too, have known kids with peanut allergies. One of our neighbor's has a child with one and the ambulance has pulled up at least 3x in the past 5 years.

    Our school banned peanut butter as most have where I live. I don't see a problem with it at all. If it cuts down the risk for these poor kids then I'm ok with it.
     
  9. Kymistry35

    Kymistry35 It's never to late to be who you could have been

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    I think that a parent who would fight for their child's right to eat peanut butter when it could put a child's life in danger, is sending their child the message that others do not matter. Where is the compassion? Kids can eat peanut butter at home, or switch to sunflower butter which taste the same, there is no reason why they HAVE to take it to school, and these children who have allergies desrve to be safe at school and live as normal a life as possible.
     
  10. Paladin

    Paladin Former Member

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    True, but doesn't that go both ways? Don't kids without allergies deserve to have a normal life as well, including bringing peanut butter snacks to schools? Why disrupt the majority of children to accomodate 1 or a few?
     
  11. Jeana (DP)

    Jeana (DP) Former Member

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    Where will all the cute little peanuts get their education??? Thank God my peanuts don't have any food allergies.:p
     
  12. SadieMae

    SadieMae Former Member

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    :D Usually on threads, I go one way or the other. This is the first time I'm stuck in the middle. I see both sides are right, so I'm staying out of this one.
     
  13. jilly

    jilly Registered User

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    Because it's a potentially deadly allergy? I just don't see the hardship of a child without the allergy having to wait until after school to have his/her peanut butter snack.
     
  14. Annie

    Annie New Member

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    I think a child that has an allergy that bad should be homeschooled or kept in an isolated classroom. The peanuts or peanut products are in so many products it would be almost impossible to keep a child away from them. I would think the child that severely allergic wouldn't be able to go into a grocery store where there are peanut products or a restaurant where something might have peanuts in it. I don't think everyone should have to give up eating peanuts because a child has a bad allergy. I am severely allergic to strawberries but I don't expect everyone else to give them up. The person with the allergy should make the accommodations, not the rest of the world. This would be similar to people who have no resistance to disease and must stay isolated.
     
  15. Kymistry35

    Kymistry35 It's never to late to be who you could have been

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    Why should these children be isolated and made to feel like social outcast? I think attitudes like this is what makes our children so unsympathetic to others. Kids today think their wants should come before everyone elses needs. If kids MUST have peanut butter, why shoudn't they be the ones isolated? Send them to a class by themselves to eat.
     
  16. Paladin

    Paladin Former Member

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    It is a hardship when many parents have to change what lunch they send their kid to school with to accomodate 1 child. Peanut butter is a cheap and affordable source of food for a kid.

    It's not even about peanut butter or peanuts. It's about it being a catalyst to start banning every little thing in school to accomodate every child. Banning peanuts would set a very dangerous precedent. Pretty soon you'll have children going to school in plastic baggies because another child is allergic to the brand of detergent you use on your children's clothing.
     
  17. fundiva

    fundiva New Member

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    They ban guns and drugs, why not peanut butter if it that deadly to some of the students. In the elementary school my nephews go to they are not the only ones. There are about 4 or 5 with allergies that sit aside from the other kids at lunch. Fortunately for my sister she is the school cook and can watch what they eat at lunch. At the preschool my son went to they banned sweets for snacks because one of the boys had just become a diabetic. We went out of our way to show this boy he could lead a normal life and be accepted by other children and that diabetes didn't have to make him different. It really wasn't that big of a deal and healthier for our kids too. Besides, most of the children that cannot afford anything but peanut butter for sandwiches also qualify for free lunches at most schools. Maybe that's their alternative.
     
  18. Julessleuther

    Julessleuther New Member

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    I disagree wholehardedly! I think a school teaching its students to be careful with peanut products around those with allegies sends a better message that ALL children matter-both those with allergies and without. If you ban the all peanut products, you are telling the children that those who are NOT allergic do not matter, just the "special" children with allergies. I think asking every other child in a school to not have any peanut products is sending a message that a school cannot responsiblity work out a solution. Where do you draw the line? People are allergic to many things--bees, perfumes, smoke, different foods etc. Do we ban perfume and beauty products from public places because one or two people may be allergic to it? Do we ban all sugar products because someone may have diabetes? Those with allergies or special health concerns should be thoroughly taught by their parents what they can and cannot consume. They should have wet wipes with them at all times to wipe their hands when being around others.

    At my sons elementary school, every parent volunteer was taught about the peanut allergy and how to use an epipen. We were given pictures of those children with the allergies, so we know who they are. We have a "peanut-free" area of the cafeteria for those with allergies, and children without allergies can sit with their friends there as long as they do not have peanut products. A local business donated a years worth of hand wipes, which are on all lunch tables, and used for all children. They are required to wipe their hands after lunch and before they go to the playground. (This has also cutdown on illnesses at the school!) Every parent in our school has been educated on peanut allergies, and there is an approved list of snack foods that are allowed at school or in the classroom. No homemade products are allowed. We have seven kids with allergies, in a school of 1200, who have not had one peanut allergy related emergency, and it is because the whole school worked together to make the school environment safe for everyone. We have done this for seven years now. It may take alittle extra time and money, but it can be done!
     
  19. fundiva

    fundiva New Member

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    By the way, my nephews weren't born with peanut allergies. They developed over time. It is nearly impossible to find two siblings so close in age that have nut allergies (so says their doctor). The doctor also thinks the allergies were brought on by the fact that they ate a lot of peanut butter when they were young and their systems started to reject it. So eating a lot of peanut butter in elementary school might be a bad idea anyway.
     
  20. Kymistry35

    Kymistry35 It's never to late to be who you could have been

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    Sometimes having a peanut free area is not enough, we had a child at our daycare who could have a reaction if he was in the room with peanuts, peanut butter, etc. The other parents were considerate and there was not a big uproar about it. There is a big jump from banning peanut products and banning less serious things that may cause a reaction.
     
  21. Paladin

    Paladin Former Member

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    I don't know about that...from an article titled "Unexpected Sources of Peanut Allergy"

    http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20030315/food.asp

    "...we're not meant to become allergic to things that we eat." From an evolutionary point of view, he says, exposure to foreign proteins through the gut should "lead to tolerance"—the dampening of an allergic response—"which indeed it does in the majority of individuals."

    The body doesn't have the same protection against an allergic response to foreign proteins and other substances that don't go through the gut. Indeed, Lack notes, people who work in the food industry and thereby breathe traces of food-derived proteins often acquire contact or inhalation allergies to those foods "while being able to still [safely] eat them."
    This suggests, he says, that "low-dose exposures through a route other than the gastrointestinal tract may actually switch on an allergy." Higher exposures, he says, tend to switch on another part of the immune system, which correlates with the development of tolerance. In other words, exposures to tiny amounts of proteins, such as can contaminate peanut oil, "may in fact be more allergenic than high-dose exposures."

    So...I don't think kids eating peanut butter is really a bad thing. Perhaps they should look into the recipes to see if they have changed in time with the rising amount of people with these allergies? Or maybe this rise in allergies is proportional to our rising population.
     

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