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Phil Collin's ex-wife left paralyzed by 'routine' operation

Discussion in 'Celebrity and Entertainment News' started by zwiebel, Feb 10, 2015.

  1. zwiebel

    zwiebel New Member

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    42-year-old Orianne Collins, the former wife of Phil Collins, has been left paralyzed from 'the top of her body to her feet' after an operation on a cervical hernia in Switzerland. She was married to Collins from 1999 - 2008 and they have two children.

    Swiss-born Orianne lives in Miami but opted to have the operation in her native country because of 'the quality of care' in the country.

    She has filed a criminal complaint against the unidentified hospital, which denies any medical error.

    http://m.thelocal.ch/20150205/phil-collins-paralyzed-ex-wife-files-suit
     
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  3. zwiebel

    zwiebel New Member

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  4. TTF14

    TTF14 Well-Known Member

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    How awful!!!
     
  5. wendybtn

    wendybtn Well-Known Member

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    I don't think the operation went wrong. There was a 1 in 10,000 chance of this outcome. And this is not a lawsuit as we think of it here in the US. It reads more like she is seeking information to see who she can successfully sue. More like "discovery" here perhaps. Feel bad for her.
     
  6. katydid23

    katydid23 Verified Juanette

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    How devastating.
     
  7. Really?

    Really? Well-Known Member

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    yikes.....no such thing to me any more of a "routine op".........
     
  8. nrdsb4

    nrdsb4 Well-Known Member

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    As someone who has had neck surgery, I'm not so sure I would categorize any surgery working near the spinal cord as "routine." But that's just me.

    Horrible outcome for this woman.

    ETA:

    After reading the link, I don't understand how her complaint can be characterized in this way:


    BBM

    "Criminal"?
     
  9. nrdsb4

    nrdsb4 Well-Known Member

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    The article linked in the OP links to another article written in French.

    It seems with re-hab, she has regained some function, but she will never again be the same. This is something that was on the consent form I signed. I remember just hoping that I wasn't that one in a kajillion, which is probably what most people do after reading a consent form with all its horrors in black and white on the page.

    I had worked as a RN with my neurosurgeon at a hospital for years, so I at least knew him very well and had never seen a patient of his with that kind of outcome. But still, those risks are on that consent form for a reason.

    Poor lady!
     
  10. zwiebel

    zwiebel New Member

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    'Doctors diagnosed a Brown-Sequard syndrome following a spinal cord injury. Vaudoise, 41, mother of three children ages 3, 10 and 14, can not move her arms, partially. "Her left leg is paralyzed. Her right leg is numb. She moves in a wheelchair and can only work if she is supported by people, "says her lawyer.

    The evolution of his condition remains very uncertain.'

    Here is a link to the google translation of the original French article. It replaces 'her' with 'his' or 'it' so is a bit confusing.

    http://translate.google.de/translat...aralysee-operation/story/20971156&prev=search
     
  11. oceanblueeyes

    oceanblueeyes Well-Known Member

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    So if something didn't happen during the surgery then what do you think went wrong if it was not the operation?
     
  12. nrdsb4

    nrdsb4 Well-Known Member

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    If something is a known risk, and it happens, I'd say the operation "went wrong," but one can't automatically assume it went wrong because of negligence. Because this clearly is not a desired outcome, I'd be comfortable saying it went wrong. Surgeons can accidentally nick arteries, other organs, etc, or while working in close proximity to the spinal cord, they can accidentally damage the spinal cord. That's why that particular outcome is noted on the consent form.

    I don't blame her for wanting to know exactly what occurred and why. I would as well.
     
  13. Kensie

    Kensie Well-Known Member

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    how horrible and devastating for this poor woman.
     
  14. Kateyes

    Kateyes New Member

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    "Brown-Sequard Syndrome is a rare disorder of the spinal cord. The condition is named for Charles Brown-Sequard, a French physiologist of the 19th century. It is a type of incomplete lesion resulting from impairment to one side only of the spinal cord; the other side of the spinal cord is left intact and functional. Complete lesions, in contrast, disable the whole width of the cord. The syndrome can develop from a variety of causes."

    More at the link, below:

    http://brownsequard.com/disease-overview
     

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