Pictures: Trees Cocooned in Spider Webs After Flood

Discussion in 'Bizarre and Off-Beat News' started by Steely Dan, Apr 2, 2011.

  1. Steely Dan

    Steely Dan Former Member

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    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/pictures/110331-pakistan-flood-spider-trees-webs

    Here's a couple of pictures. There's a lot more at the link.

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    Trees shrouded in ghostly cocoons line the edges of a submerged farm field in the Pakistani village of Sindh, where 2010's massive floods drove millions of spiders into the trees to spin their webs.

    Beginning last July, unprecedented monsoons dropped nearly ten years' worth of rainfall on Pakistan in one week, swelling the country's rivers. The water was slow to recede, creating vast pools of stagnant water across the countryside....


    I don't want to be around when they decide to come back to the ground. :eek:
     
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  3. Truthwillsetufree

    Truthwillsetufree New Member

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    OMG...my Freak A Meter is in total overdrive! I have never seen anything so grotesque in all my life. It is just unbelievable. I know it isn't the "green" thing to do or the environmental/earthy thing but I say bring back DDT and kill these buggers!
     
  4. Steely Dan

    Steely Dan Former Member

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    Flamethrowers are more environmentally friendly. :innocent:
     
  5. peeples

    peeples New Member

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    Wowsa
     
  6. sassy_texasbelle2

    sassy_texasbelle2 Well butter my butt and call me a biscuit

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    SHUDDER
    Just seeing one Daddy Long Legs in the bathroom sends me screaming out the door for hubby.
     
  7. Kat

    Kat Kind words do not cost much

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    HAHAHA I just called my youngest daughter down to look at the pics. She hates spiders. I'm an evil Mom bwahahaha.

    Seriously, I don't like spiders although I'm not afraid of them at all but I think I wouldn't be standing there under a bough for reals.
     
  8. WhyaDuck?

    WhyaDuck? Inactive

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    I'm surprised at the negative reaction against these pictures. I actually think these are really neat.

    Besides, if there are pools of stagnant water around, these spiders will be essential to keep the populations of various flies down. Otherwise, who knows how much malaria would run rampant when the flies and mosquitoes in the pools start hatching.
     
  9. peeples

    peeples New Member

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    I think the photos are cool! I'v seen other ones like that taken in the rain forests before!

    I don't LOVE spiders, my oldest son wants a tarantula though and we'll probably do that one day.. but i like that they eat bugs!!
     
  10. Truthwillsetufree

    Truthwillsetufree New Member

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    Well see? That's why I'm not in charge of the wildlife.
     
  11. Truthwillsetufree

    Truthwillsetufree New Member

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    Lots of tarantulas where I live, not in town but out in the country....scary!
     
  12. tapu

    tapu Pretty scary.

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    I recall, growing up in Appalachia, large webs or clouds similar to this hanging from our trees. We used to burn them, no doubt damaging the trees, but I think the trees would have been damaged by the web sacs or what was in them. Anyone here know what these were??
    ________________________________

    Ah, found it: the Fall Webworm. Okay, this may win the prize for "Really-Gross-Things-You-Don't-Want-As-Part-of-Your Habitat." (Not a contest anyone really wants to win.)

    http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nurspest/fall_webworm.htm

    scroll down for images on the right. couldn't that next-to-last one turn your stomach? Okay, now imagine them writhing around when you burn them!

    Uh-oh, my inner Appalachian child is showing.
     
  13. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight New Member

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    You found it right as I was about to tell you what they were, lol. My grandma taught me how to burn them when I was a child, too, and yes, they always writhed around and fell to the ground by the hundreds as we burned them. She often would soak a corn cob in kerosene and stick it on the end of a pole to do the job. Not sure why burning was so popular as Raid does the job, I am told. If they are low enough, it would have been better for the tree to cut the branch off first and toss them into a burning barrel.
     
  14. gogrannypop

    gogrannypop Call Me Butter, I'm On A Roll

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    tapu, maybe they were tent worms.
     
  15. stilettos

    stilettos Former Member

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    :eek::eek::eek: That's really bad, 'kay? I be skeered of spiders. Grandpa used to say not to kill them cause they eat bugs. Never saw a decrease in bug population so I say kill them all. I just threw up in my mouth.
     
  16. WhyaDuck?

    WhyaDuck? Inactive

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    I remember seeing those tent worm things as a kid, but my folks never did anything about them, and they never seemed to do any harm. Of course, we lived in the woods, so perhaps my folks were more concerned about bears or something.

    But, thanks - I never knew that some people burned them out.
     
  17. tapu

    tapu Pretty scary.

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    We wouldn't have used Raid because we were "hill people." Besides, burning them was big entertainment back there! Yes, DK, you're right--I remember them burning by the hundreds and dropping to the ground. Man, there just ain't that kinda fun no more, ya know?
     
  18. tapu

    tapu Pretty scary.

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    Oh, we had them, too. I remember we'd run into them in the "crotch" of a tree when we climbed it.

    (I sure am glad I am so very sophisticated now.) :giggle:
     
  19. tapu

    tapu Pretty scary.

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    Oh, we had them, too. I remember we'd run into them in the "crotch" of a tree when we climbed it.

    (I sure am glad I am so very sophisticated now.) :giggle:
     
  20. norest4thewicked

    norest4thewicked Karma is a beautiful thing ~

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    After our big flood last May in Nashville, the brown recluses that lived in the basements of the old riverside buildings downtown were displaced. For a while, people were seeing brown recluses where they'd never seen them before. I heard the story of a brand new building on higher ground near the riverside had seen a couple of them and so they had those sticky bug catchers down everywhere. They caught HUNDREDS of them in those. *shudder*
     
  21. Steely Dan

    Steely Dan Former Member

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    That's the man's job. Bug killer.

    For the first 9 years of my life I lived in Delaware (but I consider myself a Rochestarian.) and there were things like that on the trees that hatched harmless caterpillars.
     

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