Poll for the Armchair Psychologists

Discussion in 'Travis Alexander Trial - The State vs. Jodi Arias' started by 2Hip2BSquare, Apr 9, 2013.

?

What Psychological Disorder do you think Jodi may have?

  1. Antisocial Personality Disorder

    13.7%
  2. Dissociative Identity Disorder

    3.3%
  3. Borderline Personality Disorder

    17.0%
  4. Bipolar Mood Disorder

    3.5%
  5. She is sane and has no Psychological Disorder.

    2.4%
  6. multiple personality disorders not listed in poll

    2.2%
  7. Sociopath w/Borderline Personality Disorder

    54.8%
  8. Narcissistic Personality Disorder

    29.8%
  9. Anti-Social Personality Disorder w/ Psychopathy

    17.8%
  10. Just one crazy succubus from hell!

    12.6%
  11. Hystrionic personality disorder

    3.7%
  12. Personality Disorder NOS

    2.2%
  13. Sociopath with no other disorders

    4.1%
  14. D.I.D. w/cluster B

    0.2%
  15. Histrionic Personality Disorder

    1.7%
  16. Psychopathic & BPD.

    0.9%
Multiple votes are allowed.
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  1. Gecko100

    Gecko100 Well-Known Member

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    Very good points, and she just isn't a psychopath.
    I have considered C-PTSD, and maybe an introverted intuitive framework, which might be a rare typology like only a small percentage of the wider community. She is creative by nature, and hopeless at decent quality conning and lying. If she had been a psychopath, she would have killed him cleanly and efficiently probably whilst he was asleep, closed the door and left.
    What we see though, is red blooded emotionality and passion all over the floors walls and bathroom. It's not a cold blooded hit of a psychopath in any way.
    Lots of different things could be the precursors of current presenting issues, sexual abuse, domestic violence, sexism, racism, oppression, misrepresentation, depression anxiety what ever it is...
    I still view her as depressed anxious and suicidal, not like ASPD at all, they are truly frightening, and couldn't give two hoots, just bring on more exciting risks.
    I just don't get that from her, and I think she is numb and medicated.
    She is without a doubt misunderstood, and we still have no agreement and still think it's ok to kill her. I don't.
    The thought of killing someone unwell, or even autistic is very unsettling to others possibly in the same position, and is totally stigmatising and discriminatory. None off us are totally infallible, and psychology originating from philosophy is not a hard science.
    So it could be 50/50 either way from many angles including sociology, feminism, meta-modernism,
    phenomenology, eco-systems theories, dialectical theories existentialism etc. So why only psychology, when each equally informs the other?
     


  2. tralala1

    tralala1 New Member

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    Wow, I have never considered this, but it's a fascinating theory! I can see how she might be a highly functioning woman with Asperger's!
     
  3. SMK

    SMK New Member

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    I have always been of the opinion that the crime was not intended to be such a brutal one - but maybe I'm all wet on that.

    I had considered that she simply "wanted him gone" so that she could move on in life without being tormented by reports of his success or marriage - narcissistic a crime in itself. But I had presupposed something going awry, and the ensuing violence enacted out of fear only that he would run to the neighbors. Again, my entire premise could be wrong. If so, then she certainly was/is more sadistic and sociopathic than I had conjectured.
     
  4. molly333

    molly333 New Member

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    High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    *snip*

    Unlike people with other forms of autism, people with high-functioning autism or Asperger's syndrome want to be involved with others. They simply don't know how to go about it. They may not be able to understand others' emotions. They may not read facial expressions or body language well. As a result, they may be teased and often feel like social outcasts. The unwanted social isolation can lead to anxiety and depression.

    http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/high-functioning-autism



    Sound like Jodi in Mormonland?
     
  5. tralala1

    tralala1 New Member

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    Very interesting idea! It's true that she's not really "void of emotion" because she was filled with rage and jealousy! Also, remember how her mother said, "Jodi would call me in the morning all happy, and then an hour later, she would call back crying hysterically about something and she wouldn't tell me what." So, can you just have negative emotions without having positive ones? Travis seemed to make her giddy when things were going well.
     
  6. Beaglemania

    Beaglemania New Member

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    BBM: I do not see any need to add yet more labels and categories to the DSM V. It takes years of both empirical and clinical research before new categories/subcategories of mental disorders are even remotely considered for inclusion in the DSM. I don't think there is a large enough sample.

    Too many people, not just women, are not getting the treatment that they need.

    What in the heck is a "lower-case harlot"??
     
  7. Emmi

    Emmi New Member

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    Molly, I really do see what you're seeing--possible Asperger's traits. It crossed my mind a few days after she took the stand. Her precision with words (despite the odd mistake or two) and her hyper-lexia, flat-affect, etc. I find her rather phlegmatic, rather than dramatic (though people seem to "see" all kind of drama in the court room, I don't). And, though Borderline Personality is in the dramatic cluster, I can't see why she couldn't have both high-functioning autistic and borderline traits. Borderline is marked by extreme, unmanaged emotional pain, and Asperger's is known for creating all kinds of secondary disorders (like depression and social anxiety), due to being consistently rejected and invalidated by family and peers.
     
  8. SMK

    SMK New Member

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    This is an interesting theory, and I have heard the same said about Amanda Knox. In females, autism is often very subtle and leaves the girl/woman very high-functioning, but with something missing in the realm of empathy. There is also a very unusual "theory of mind" that makes means/ends reasoning all off kilter. --- My sisters and I have often wondered if our mother might be an undiagnosed high-functioning Aspberger syndrome: She did well in college, etc., but is known for her "out of left field" comments, her bizarre interactions with others, and her maddening indifference to her own daughters' safety and well being when we were growing up.
     
  9. SMK

    SMK New Member

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    Yes, her manner of speaking has some Aspberger-like qualities as well (Arias).
    ETA: In the end, Aspberger syndrome is only describing a mix of high intelligence and lacking inter-personal relation proclivities: From what my son's doctor says, the neurology is complicated and one cannot make a blanket statement about those with the syndrome. There are differences.
     
  10. molly333

    molly333 New Member

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    Regarding the borderline characteristics people are seeing, other things can mimic that. Women in abusive relationships, for instance, can look like borderlines. Or high stress situations over long periods of time where you are constantly being flooded by fight or flight neurochemicals.

    *I think* if Jodi had married Daryl and knocked out a few kids, we would never have heard of her. Daryl was able to provide her with the consistent, supportive, and loving environment she needed for long periods of time--until he couldn't anymore because he had to start following his child around California.

    Dr. G. pointed to the test scores that were off the charts in the anxiety issues and said, this looks like "a cry for help."

    I think Jodi decided to try to swim with the big boys, leaving her comfort zone near the shore, and sank like a rock. She just couldn't handle anything that, for lack of a better word, socially complicated.

    IMO
     
  11. slanda

    slanda Verified Victim's Advocate

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    I'm an ENTJ ;) -- I think I was the first one who talked to you, Gecko. :)
     
  12. Gecko100

    Gecko100 Well-Known Member

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    Interestingly you could almost equate those qualities to some Jungian types.
    The classic computer stereotype of 'nerd' would exhibit some of those qualities.
    And they are the exactly same qualities as I posses but I am more tempered with age. Your average intp relates quite well to computers, but to be whole people they need to strengthen the weaker side, but JA is very young, and may only be partially developed in some some areas. I don't know what her type is, but she is definitely misunderstood behaviourally, so I could take some pot shots...
     
  13. Emmi

    Emmi New Member

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    I was jumping off your post, Beaglemania, about Darryl being "p-whipped" and Jodi being a sexually promiscuous woman (a "harlot"), to make a point that when we are discussing potential diagnoses for Arias, we should really try to avoid sexist double-standards and stereotypes. Because our own prejudices, about what is normal behaviour for men and women, may colour our perceptions of mental illnesses and disorders.

    Sorry that I wasn't clear.
     
  14. Gecko100

    Gecko100 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Slanda I think you were:)
    ENTJ
    INFP
    ENFP
    INTP
    Any others?:seeya::seeya:
     
  15. shelley921

    shelley921 New Member

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    I took the test years ago in grad school and I was an INFP. I should take it again now.
     
  16. Gecko100

    Gecko100 Well-Known Member

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    Well it won't have changed. What changes is the strength of your least employed side, the ESTJ. You will always be INFP, but you will move closer to the opposite as you age.
    N types are currently out numbering
    Well the N/p types clearly see different possibilities...and are experiencing a level of not quite ready to close off the decision making yet.
     
  17. Linda7NJ

    Linda7NJ Well-Known Member

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    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1369246193.168426.jpg

    Took it,

    Have no idea what it means???


    Read everything on the website, agree with everything, including career (apparently I found my niche) . ....only exceptions : i don't concur with ...believing in dreams and spiritual seeking. Perhaps as a child but I am a long time atheist. I'm not enabler, I have fairly firm boundaries.. I'm not easily hurt & have pretty tough skin.
     
  18. SMK

    SMK New Member

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    Yes, at 30 , as Nietzsche says, one is a mere child....
    Yes, the Jungian types of "introverted" etc. or the 'thinking versus feeling' or 'sensing versus intuition' theories do apply....I find them far more interesting than DSM definitions, but that is the type i am ;)
     
  19. Linda7NJ

    Linda7NJ Well-Known Member

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    Aren't I an "N" type?

    I'm very closed off.
     
  20. Linda7NJ

    Linda7NJ Well-Known Member

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    It's all new to me, I'm finding it very interesting....

    I don't understand the difference between "sensing verses intuition" or the theory.
     
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