(Prescription Drug) National Take Back Initiative

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Snackcakes66, Sep 24, 2010.

  1. Snackcakes66

    Snackcakes66 Member

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
  2. Missy70Texas

    Missy70Texas Member

    Messages:
    535
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I read about this in another news publication; I always flush mine down the toilet when they are outdated, is this wrong??
     
  3. Belinda

    Belinda Doer of Things

    Messages:
    5,669
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I used to flush mine also, until I found how high the levels of drugs in our water systems is. Part of that is caused by flushing drugs down the toilet. Now I don't know what to do with them.
     
  4. Filly

    Filly KICKING AND SHINING

    Messages:
    17,500
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Here are some tips of how one should dispose of their old medications. This also goes for OTC med's as well.




    http://cancer.about.com/od/treatmentoptions/a/drugdisposal.htm

    You supposedly can take them to the pharmacy. Hmmmmmm. Don't know about that one. Throw them in the trash with things like grabage and cat litter. O.K. then. There's some more here.

    Never did I think about this as we always flushed as well. Then my grandpop had Fentanyl patches. That gave my poor Opa something to do for a little while. He wrapped them up like nobody's business before putting them in the trash.

    My friend is a drug/alcohol counselor and told me horror stories of addicts going through the hospital's hazardous waste looking for discarded Fentanyl patches.
     
  5. SunnieRN

    SunnieRN Active Member

    Messages:
    3,577
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Unfortunately, as posted by Belinda, there are levels of drugs, all drugs, in our water supplies. There are narcotics, psychographics and OTC med levels in our water. Scary!

    Hospice nurses gather all drugs, put them in a plastic (ziplock type) bag. They then add water, until the pills dissolve. They then throw them in the garbage. Not saying that is the best way, but it does render them useless, since they are dissolved.
     
  6. Belinda

    Belinda Doer of Things

    Messages:
    5,669
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My question is - if we put them in the trash, whether dissolved or not, won't they still find their way into our water system through run-off? Does anybody know about this?
     
  7. tk71texas

    tk71texas wth is wrong with people today

    Messages:
    1,192
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    i read in houston they collected 1 1/2 tons of stuff....wowsa!!!
     
  8. bessie

    bessie Administrator Staff Member Administrator Moderator

    Messages:
    31,702
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    0
    After my first husband died, I asked our pharmacist if I should bring his unused meds to the pharmacy for disposal because it was a large amount. He looked at me like I was from Mars. So much for that. I flushed them. Now I empty the bottles into a bag with leftovers from the fridge, meat scraps or coffee grinds. This is not the safest method because the chemicals will eventually make their way into the groundwater. But what to do?

    The pharmaceutical companies make oodles and oodles of money mass producing and mass distributing drugs, so many of which are unnecessary for the condition they're prescribed. Now all these pills are cluttering up the planet (a million-and-a-half tons in Houston? Wow.) I say we put pressure on Pharma to come up with a viable recycling plan for their nasty drugs.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice