Missing pregnant Shanann Watts and her two daughter's bodies found, husband arrested
Join the latest discussion

Race and DNA (again)

Discussion in 'JonBenet Ramsey' started by Jayelles, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. Jayelles

    Jayelles New Member

    Messages:
    2,389
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The RST claim that the foreign DNA came from a male caucasian who is not a RAmsey. Some RST make snide remarks about the "BORG" suggestion that the foreign DNA in JonBenet's knickers came from a factory - asking how many white males work in asian sweat shops.

    I have been following this case since the year 2000 and I have learned a LITTLE bit about forensics in that time - I certainly don't claim to be an expert. I'm uncomfortable with unsubstantiated information though and the male, caucasian DNA IMO is unsubstantiated.

    I believe that it may be a false rumour which has come about as a result of two other (probably) factual pieces of information:-

    1) that a hair found on the blanket was caucasian
    2) the DNA in her knickers was male

    Mitochondrial DNA from hair
    The DNA which is extracted from hair is called mitochondrial DNA or mtDNA and it is often possible to determine race from mtDNA - but only because scientists undertook a massive study of mtDNA and built a database of information - including race. mtDNA is passed through the maternal line and therefore entire ancestral trees can be mapped with it. However, sex cannot be determined from mtDNA.

    Nuclear DNA
    This is the more common DNA and it contains more information than mtDNA. It is found in blood, saliva, skin cells, semen - even urine. It IS possible to determine sex from nuclear DNA but race is more problematic because nuclear DNA is passed sexually rather than matrilineally.

    In the most recent Schiller programme, it was claimed, yet again, that the DNA is that of a caucasian male and I have questioned the truth of this because it seems doubtful that race can be determined from nuclear DNA - and the DNA in the knickers was nuclear DNA - possibly from a cough or a sneeze (saliva/snot).

    On the other thread, I posted two sources which said that race could not be determined from DNA - one of these was dated 2003. I conceded that it might be possible that advances in science since then have made this possible - but I still questioned the source on Schiller's programme. The source is Bill Wise, former Boulder ADA who retired in 2000 and is IMO, long out of touch with the case and not a good source for such an important piece of information.

    Now I have found another source which is bang up to date and from an impeccable source:-








    Source - the National Human Genome Research institute
    Date - 25th April 2006

    http://www.genome.gov/18516768
     
  2. Jayelles

    Jayelles New Member

    Messages:
    2,389
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Here's a study which challenges the belief that race cannot be determined by DNA.

     
  3. Jayelles

    Jayelles New Member

    Messages:
    2,389
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    More on the same study:-

    http://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/02/neil-risch-on-race.html

    Not clear, but it seems that Risch has found that race can be determined via biological predisposition to certain health factors (nothing new there).

    i.e. find the DNA information for sickle-cell anaemia and that person is almost certainly black

    He states that his samples could be split into 4 racial categories and that only one of these categories could be further divided (East Asian had separate subcategories for Chinese and Japanese).

    I am looking for peer review on this study as that seems to be important for scientific credibility.
     
  4. Jayelles

    Jayelles New Member

    Messages:
    2,389
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Actually, in this article, Rische is agreeing with the Genome scientists:-


    When they said:-


     

Share This Page



  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice