Reuters editor Matthew Keys accused of aiding group Anonymous' hack of Trib Co. site

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by wfgodot, Mar 14, 2013.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Feds Charge Reuters Editor With Aiding Anonymous Attack (mashable.com)

    Reuters editor Matthew Keys accused of helping Anonymous hack news site (Guardian)
    more at the links
     
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  3. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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  4. i.b.nora

    i.b.nora I am polka dot

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  5. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Matthew RT'd his own indictment:
     
  6. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    ....and how he learned of the indictment:
     
  7. matou

    matou #los2188

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    So is there any credence to the allegations? This is my main go-to guy for live news updates. AESCracked is linked to him? Scapegoat?
     
  8. matou

    matou #los2188

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    I can't see him saying "go and f*** some sh** up" to hackers. JMO
    I call BS and that anonymous hacked in without help from Keys.
     
  9. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    The government have already given us one Aaron Swartz. Intent here fairly clear: take down another, this one popular in the social media/journalist crew. Sends message, no matter what charge they attach.

    Yes, MK also my go-to for breaking news. Only 26 so this alleged act - he would have been no older than 24. I myself was wild at that age.

    And it allegedly produced this?
    Oh, fear and loathing run rampant in the land! ah! the academy in peril! etc. etc.
     
  10. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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  11. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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  12. i.b.nora

    i.b.nora I am polka dot

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    The Reuters article is the best so far and a recent correction says:

    "(This story corrects wording of fifth paragraph to make clear that work station, not computer, was being dismantled)"
     
  13. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    .....
     
  14. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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  15. Dr. Know?

    Dr. Know? Former Member

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  16. thesaint

    thesaint New Member

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    Weird. These cms's are far from secure. Doubt any experienced network system penetrator would've had any trouble getting into a large CMS like this one, fmr employee's credentials not required or even desired really.

    One major security flaw is the tendency to use default passwords that never get changed (often some iteration of the username e.g., for John Smith, jsmithfall2012) and a lack of vigilance in enforcing password policies and, in this case, not deleting the ex-employee's account on termination.

    I'm guessing that they (the DOJ) decided to follow through with this to

    (i) have the deal they cut with Sabu Hector Xavier Monsegur bear as much fruit as possible;

    tho they've had the goods on Keys for almost 2 years now. these events took place from December 2010 to March 2011, and Sabu was turned out by the FBI in June of 2011.

    (ii) like the prosecutions of celebs like Willie Nelson/Wesley Snipes/Martha Stewart, the DOJ likes to throw the book at--or even prosecute in the first place--high profile defendants as a means of "visible deterrence".

    If Keys weren't a visible public figure--I've never heard of him before, but in the context of the web, he appears to be sufficiently high profile that prosecuting him is a significant news event--he'd probably have rec'd a visit from the FBI and a stern talking to and that would've been that.
     

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