SC - Paul Murdaugh, 22 and mom Margaret, 52, found shot to death, Islandton, 7 June 2021 #4

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Gardenista

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It is a little surprising that he is resigning from the law firm, and not 'stepping away' or 'taking a leave of absence' while seeking treatment at least IMO. The death of one's parent and murder of wife & son are certainly enough to change the entire trajectory of one's life, for sure, and I can see those life altering losses, as well as addiction or mental health causing one to need extended time off, but the resignation is just very interesting.

100% agree. The resignation vs leave is a meaningful part of this.
 

stattlich1

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You did see the flat tire, correct?

Well. I have scrutinized the available media relative to this tire. I suggest there is the possibility it is not flat at all. That tire appears to be sitting on a gravel berm below the surface of the road's blacktop. It gives the appearance of being flat, but maybe it isn't.

Take a closer looky and tell me what ya think!
 

TJW

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His name is on the firm & RMIV is still there. If he isn’t involved in any of this murder mess & just needs help to deal with all he has been through, I think he could probably come back to the firm. If not
convicted on the OJJ case too.
 

MajorHoople

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It is a little surprising that he is resigning from the law firm, and not 'stepping away' or 'taking a leave of absence' while seeking treatment at least IMO. The death of one's parent and murder of wife & son are certainly enough to change the entire trajectory of one's life, for sure, and I can see those life altering losses, as well as addiction or mental health causing one to need extended time off, but the resignation is just very interesting.

A couple of weeks ago I made a prediction. Perhaps it came true.

"With all this bad publicity it wouldn't surprise me if the PMPED Law Firm tried to push AM out of the law firm his great-grandfather founded in 1910."
 

TJW

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I’ve always wondered about the June 10th civil case procedure where the Beach lawsuit was going to ask for more financial records. The murders of PM & MM were June 7th. I keep wondering if there was something in those financial records the Murdaughs didn’t want out.
 

LotusPawprint

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I’ve seen several attorneys in my city battle drug/alcohol issues (all of whom were partners and/or their name was on the firm). In virtually every scenario, something came to a head (DUI, caught stealing pills, etc.). In every single case, they went to rehab and were forced to resign from their firms. I think firms really have no choice in these situations.


Yes, I think it is quite different for lawyers (and medical professionals) than it is for people in other professions.
My point, and I think what you echoed with what you have seen in your city, is that this was likely not just addiction. Like you said, whether it's a case of DUI or stealing pills etc or practicing while intoxicated, that can start to open the door to who, if anyone, knew what was going on or looked the other way, etc..

No idea what the circumstances were here, but I don't think that addiction on its own without other layers would lead someone to leave their legal career.
 

Luna20

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Well. I have scrutinized the available media relative to this tire. I suggest there is the possibility it is not flat at all. That tire appears to be sitting on a gravel berm below the surface of the road's blacktop. It gives the appearance of being flat, but maybe it isn't.

Take a closer looky and tell me what ya think!

Has the issue with the tire type on this model car been clarified yet? I’ve heard that there isn’t a tire to change, as well equipped with “run flats”. Is that the correct term?
 

Gardenista

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Yes, I think it is quite different for lawyers (and medical professionals) than it is for people in other professions.
My point, and I think what you echoed with what you have seen in your city, is that this was likely not just addiction. Like you said, whether it's a case of DUI or stealing pills etc or practicing while intoxicated, that can start to open the door to who, if anyone, knew what was going on or looked the other way, etc..

No idea what the circumstances were here, but I don't think that addiction on its own without other layers would lead someone to leave their legal career.

Actually medical professionals get many, many chances before they are relieved of their positions. It's scary, but true.
 

ElementalLaura

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Here we have the first statement from AM since the murders. Let’s parse away (not statement analysis, I don’t know the field).

It’s prepared, likely with the help of attorneys, and not provided verbally, and thus less valuable than an extemporaneous statement would be. Still, it’s what we have at hand.

The following (other than the statement quoted in italics) is speculation only.

“The murders of my wife and son have caused an incredibly difficult time in my life. I have made a lot of decisions that I truly regret.”

I absolutely believe the murders of one’s significant other and child would be incredibly difficult. No mention of his father’s death, though that was expected after a long illness and wouldn’t be the same shock that the sudden murders provided.

I’m interested that he immediately follows this statement with one of regret over decisions he has made. Is he implying that he regrets decisions made since the murders (time-bracketing)? Or also prior to the murders?

He refers to “a lot” of decisions without linking those decisions to any outcomes other than regret. MOO.

“I’m resigning from my law firm and entering rehab after a long battle that has been exacerbated by these murders.”

This clearly states that his addiction issues preceded the murders, but may have worsened following the murders.

MOO: I buy this. PM clearly exhibited signs of alcohol abuse and what could be construed as enabling by his parents may also have been a combination of 1) not wanting to acknowledge a core issue because it would mean examining the role alcohol plays in their own lives, and 2) anger and shame that PM wasn’t able to maintain a highly functioning facade when drinking. IMO, many family activities involved drinking. IMHO.

I also wouldn’t be surprised if there were co-addictions (or an addiction spawned by a legit attempt to curb drinking as he grew older). Given his demographic, I would guess some form of prescription pills. MOO.

The statement juxtaposing two actions — resigning from the law firm and entering rehab — indicates IMHO that the addiction affected his professional work to the extent that his colleagues felt this action was needed. I don’t see him resigning without pressure being brought to bear. MOO.

As a partner, I assume he’d have to be bought out. Would he be able to resign and still maintain any ownership stake?

“I am immensely sorry to everyone I’ve hurt including my family, friends and colleagues. I ask for prayers as I rehabilitate myself and my relationships.”

Here he seems to circle back to a lot of decisions he’s made and link those decisions to people who have been hurt by those decisions. Still vaguespeak, but any statement issued through an attorney is unlikely to be more specific.

The thought that he can “save” himself and his relationships despite the decisions he now regrets is interesting. The language indicates the belief that his decisions didn’t permanently destroy either and that he can contemplate a positive outcome (less likely for someone experiencing suicidal thoughts or deep depression). Of course, it’s somewhat boilerplate PR-speak. MOO.



Overall: The statement is focused on himself, decisions he now regrets, his addiction and his desire to repair damage to himself and his relationships. It is a non-specific confession that he’s hurt those closest to him.

There’s no mention of seeking justice for the murders or for the alleged attack, although there may be different reasons why neither was mentioned in terms of closure.

The silence on the roadside incident in particular is notable since it immediately preceded — and thus appears to be a precipitating factor for — this statement. This combined with the absence of an LE statement suggests that they are not seeking a third party in conjunction with this incident. IMHO only.

IMO, this would not be an easy public statement to issue for someone with his standing in the community (from which he likely derived some measure of self-worth) and for someone with his background (prominent, country locale, southern male). The default is usually to project strength and deny psychological/emotional/mental anguish. I suspect that he received strong counsel from family, friends and colleagues to issue this statement. I’d welcome thoughts from professionals on this.

IMO, substance abuse, addiction and great personal losses do not free someone from the consequences of poor decisions or from criminal conduct. Our prisons are filled with people who have experienced this trifecta, and AM probably prosecuted many who experienced the same.

However, sincerely taking accountability for these things usually leads to taking accountability for the consequences as well. IMO.

I hope this is the case for AM. I can’t help but wonder if things would have unfolded much differently had PM taken accountability for his issues and poor decision making.

I wish AM well in recovery and I hope for justice in the murders of MM and PM.
 

pizzaman12

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It is a little surprising that he is resigning from the law firm, and not 'stepping away' or 'taking a leave of absence' while seeking treatment at least IMO. The death of one's parent and murder of wife & son are certainly enough to change the entire trajectory of one's life, for sure, and I can see those life altering losses, as well as addiction or mental health causing one to need extended time off, but the resignation is just very interesting.

At this point his life has been ripped apart in a very short period of time.. He's lost his father, wife and child. We also don't know what his regrets are. All of this coupled with addiction could easily have consumed him. My assumption is that he's in a position most people are not and that he can step aside this moment and still be set for life with ease.
 

geevee

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Well. I have scrutinized the available media relative to this tire. I suggest there is the possibility it is not flat at all. That tire appears to be sitting on a gravel berm below the surface of the road's blacktop. It gives the appearance of being flat, but maybe it isn't.

Take a closer looky and tell me what ya think!

Also, if you look at the rear of the car, it's not tilted at all towards a 'flat tire', it appears perfectly level.
 

pizzaman12

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Yes, I think it is quite different for lawyers (and medical professionals) than it is for people in other professions.
My point, and I think what you echoed with what you have seen in your city, is that this was likely not just addiction. Like you said, whether it's a case of DUI or stealing pills etc or practicing while intoxicated, that can start to open the door to who, if anyone, knew what was going on or looked the other way, etc..

No idea what the circumstances were here, but I don't think that addiction on its own without other layers would lead someone to leave their legal career.

I disagree. Addiction grabs ahold of people differently. I've seen lawyers simply take their life due to addiction with no "wrongdoing" ever to arise.
 

sunshineray

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Yes, I think it is quite different for lawyers (and medical professionals) than it is for people in other professions.
My point, and I think what you echoed with what you have seen in your city, is that this was likely not just addiction. Like you said, whether it's a case of DUI or stealing pills etc or practicing while intoxicated, that can start to open the door to who, if anyone, knew what was going on or looked the other way, etc..

No idea what the circumstances were here, but I don't think that addiction on its own without other layers would lead someone to leave their legal career.

Within an hour's time of the boat crash at 2:21 am, AM and his father were in the ER rooms at the hospital the victims were taken to be treated.



"Blount, the nurse in charge of the ER, told investigators that she could smell alcohol on Alex Murdaugh and had to tell him multiple times to stay in his son’s room."

https://www.islandpacket.com/news/local/crime/article252883923.html



What was released today by AM's spokesperson made me think of this being said. I think AM has faced some addiction problems for quite awhile.
 

inmyhumbleopinion

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It is a little surprising that he is resigning from the law firm, and not 'stepping away' or 'taking a leave of absence' while seeking treatment at least IMO. The death of one's parent and murder of wife & son are certainly enough to change the entire trajectory of one's life, for sure, and I can see those life altering losses, as well as addiction or mental health causing one to need extended time off, but the resignation is just very interesting.
It’s possible he wasn’t given a choice, IMO.
 
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