SC - Paul Murdaugh & mom Margaret Found Shot To Death - Alex Murdaugh Accused - Islandton *Guilty* #43

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The only genuine reaction I saw from AM was when Mark Tinsley spoke. WTH was AM doing when CW was going over the charges?? Did he think he could change anything at that point or was it just a continuation of blame, and excuses?? Most of the time AM had a smug, disgusting flat lipped smirk on his face. If for no other reason than never seeing or hearing from him again, I hope this is the end of AM.
 
@TheEricBland

We would like to thank Attorney General Alan Wilson and our super hero and excellent public servant Creighton Waters for their dogged pursuit of justice for all of Alex’s crimes. It was their tireless efforts that ultimately produced an excellent negotiated plea of 27 years for the financial crimes. Alex will serve 85% of this time without the opportunity of parole. Job well done gentlemen. EB


10:08 AM · Nov 29, 2023


It is more likely than not that Alex Murdaugh will live out the remainder of his life behind bars and not get a fresh breath of free air again. With these convictions, the public will be made safe from Alex Murdaugh and those like him who would abuse their positions of trust. Ronnie and I committed to our victim clients to see this through to the end and we have. It was our career honor to be involved in these cases and to help restore some level of trust in our system and our profession. We said that we would not stop until Alex was served a “full cup of justice” just like every other criminal. Yesterday, that cup was full and served hot to Alex. EB


10:09 AM · Nov 29, 2023
 
@MPowersNorrell

I think he’s “complicated” in that it’s hard for a lot of us to understand how his mind works. I really think he’s not capable of some emotions, but he can’t know what he’s never experienced. And he’s taught himself to perform them. He really used to come off as very charming.


5:14 PM · Nov 29, 2023
 
Re-listened to #AlexMurdaugh’s speech tonight. I wanted to understand why I felt the way I did about it. He spent very little time addressing his actual victims and focused instead on how he’s sorry for embarrassing his family, showing his main concern is how he’s perceived. 1/

When he did address the victims, other than JJ, whose respect he seemed to believe he could keep, he addressed them in vague, broad brush statements, once even addressing them as a group he called “you people.” And his main point to them was that he “still cares about” them. 2/

He said several times that he “cares deeply about every one” of them as if that’s what they wanted more than an acknowledgement that he betrayed their trust. As if he was giving them a gift with his continued affection, because that has great value. It was bizarre. 3/

At the end, he addressed them again and said “I appreciate you looking at me when I’m talking to you.” It felt superior. The way he spoke to the actual victims was very different and much more distant from the way he spoke to friends and family, most of whom weren’t there. 4/

AND they weren’t the victims of the crimes for which he’d be sentenced. Still he spent the majority of his nearly 50min speech addressing the harm he’d caused to the way people in his realm are perceived by others, a clue into the way he regards those in vs out of his circle. 5/

More than the words, the *way* he said them was telling. He spoke in short clipped phrases ending in up-speak, sometimes punctuating them with a lip smack, and then an uncomfortable silence. It felt manipulative and melodramatic, essentially saying “I’m in control of the time” 6/

He used silence between phrases to try to create anticipation of what he’d say next. And he clearly enjoyed having an audience. He’d surely wanted an audience for his righteous indignation at how his family has been treated by the media. His tone re that was preachy. 7/

This was his chance to address the victims of his financial crimes, but he spent much of it in indignant preachy admonition of the public and media for the “unfair speculation” about matters that were not before the court today. It felt disrespectful to the real victims. 8/

He spoke as if he was wearing a grey tweed suit and not an orange jumpsuit. The smarmy charm that worked well for him in the courtroom when he wore the former hits different in the latter. 9/

He concluded his lengthy speech with a bold effort to reaffirm his power, saying, “I’m going to help as many people as I can while I’m incarcerated.” It smacked of the ubiquitous “lemme know if there’s anything I can do for you” statement heard often in political circles. 10/

Then he started thanking people. After giving good reviews to his rehab facility, he turned to Judge Newman, thanking him and essentially telling him he’d done a good job - accustomed to believing that people seek his approval. 11/

He ended his nearly 50 min speech by increasing his volume and saying to everyone and no one in particular, “Thank you so much!” - the way people do when they end an awards speech and expect applause to follow. 12/

And I know this is harsh but I imagine if I were a victim of his financial crimes I would be so angry today that even in his acknowledgement of the crime and betrayal, he was *still* trying to manipulate and control the narrative. 13/

I also think if Alex read this, he wouldn’t understand it. He’d say, “but I said I was sorry!” I believe he’s manipulative. I also believe he sincerely doesn’t know any other way to relate to people. 14/


 
I did notice, that a majority of people who AM stole from were minorities and people who seemed working class. Probably AM thought those people were just "unworthy" of receiving money. So, he should just keep it from them. Of course. After all, if it wasn't for him, they wouldn't have been able to get anything.

So, throwing them $10,000 and him keeping $5,000,000 or whatever he did, probably seemed fine to him.
 
I did notice, that a majority of people who AM stole from were minorities and people who seemed working class. Probably AM thought those people were just "unworthy" of receiving money. So, he should just keep it from them. Of course. After all, if it wasn't for him, they wouldn't have been able to get anything.

So, throwing them $10,000 and him keeping $5,000,000 or whatever he did, probably seemed fine to him.

That is why I’ve thought for so long that without those murders, the money crimes would have been good old boy’d right out of sight. His family would have offered peanuts and poor folks with their backs against the wall would have taken it. Thinking that it would impress the powerful family in their favor would have been more incentive to drop it.
 


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Copied from Gloria’s thread to share here:

Related to sentencing on Tuesday, what a contrast between the impassioned, articulate, and heart-felt statements delivered by Alex‘s victims and their attorneys, compared to the empty, self-centered blathering (IMHO) by AM. Me thinks thou dost protest too much — only thing he’s really sorry about was getting caught. MOO. MOO.

But of course our unshakable and beloved Judge Newman, saw right though AM. So glad CN again shared his own wise thoughts with the sentence. MOO.

Recording of FitsNews live coverage on Tues., Nov. 28: https://youtube.com/watch?v=C7MTDnloSTg
 
Eric Bland
@TheEricBland


We are so proud of our clients Tony Satterfield, Ginger Hadwin and Jordan Jinks for the articulate, heartfelt and courageous words they shared in court yesterday. They stole the show. The contrast between our clients and Alex Murdaugh was striking. Alex proved himself again to be a narcissist by using his opportunity to atone for his sins and to show contrition to his victims as an infomercial for his upcoming motion for a new trial and/or second murder trial. EB


7:07 AM · Nov 29, 2023
 
That is why I’ve thought for so long that without those murders, the money crimes would have been good old boy’d right out of sight. His family would have offered peanuts and poor folks with their backs against the wall would have taken it. Thinking that it would impress the powerful family in their favor would have been more incentive to drop it.

Interesting. AM thought he was completely above the law in the low country in South Carolina. Generational narcissism. He was so entrenched in his own super hero head, that thought he could do absolutely anything and get away with it.

It makes me wonder what else he did, that no one has found out.
 
Interesting. AM thought he was completely above the law in the low country in South Carolina. Generational narcissism. He was so entrenched in his own super hero head, that thought he could do absolutely anything and get away with it.

It makes me wonder what else he did, that no one has found out.
IMO, he still believes this and thinks he's getting a new murder trial where he will be acquitted (first trial was just practice)! I just want to know, where's the money...
 
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[…]

One victim, former highway patrolman Tommy Moore, said he trusted the state to get justice for him after Murdaugh stole his money. But he feels as though this plea falls short. And his frustration with the plea deal was one of the reasons he wasn't in court Tuesday to give his victim impact statement.

"I've got past my anger with him," Moore said. "My anger now has turned towards the state and this negotiated plea."

[…]


Moore said he was never consulted as the plea was negotiated.

He said he learned about the deal after it was considered a done deal.

"I was told about this after the fact," Moore said. "So I can't speak for all the other victims, but for me, it's not. There is no justice here."

Moore had $100,000 stolen from him by Murdaugh after a wreck left him with career-ending injuries.

[…]

 
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