Missing pregnant Shannon Watts body found, athorities believe they know where the bodies of her 2 children are located, husband arrested
Join the latest discussion

Scientists Find 'Lost World' in Indonesia

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Buzz Mills, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. Buzz Mills

    Buzz Mills New Member

    Messages:
    23,626
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Scientists Find 'Lost World' in Indonesia

    JAKARTA, Indonesia - Soon after scientists landed by helicopter in the mist-shrouded mountains of one of Indonesia's most remote provinces, they stumbled on a primitive egg-laying mammal that simply allowed itself to be picked up and brought to their field camp. Describing a "Lost World" — apparently never visited by humans — members of the team said Tuesday they also saw large mammals that have been hunted to near-extinction elsewhere and discovered dozens of exotic new species of frogs, butterflies and palms.

    "We've only scratched the surface," said Bruce Beehler, a co-leader of the monthlong trip to the Foja Mountains, an area in the eastern province of Papua with roughly 2 million acres of pristine tropical forest.

    "There was not a single trail, no sign of civilization, no sign of even local communities ever having been there," he told The Associated Press in a telephone interview from Washington, D.C. Two headmen from the Kwerba and Papasena tribes, the customary landowners of the mountain range, accompanied the expedition, and "they were as astounded as we were at how isolated it was," Beehler said. "As far as they knew, neither of their clans had ever been to the area

    http://tinyurl.com/bzg9h


    New Species Discovered in Indonesia Jungle

    JAKARTA, Indonesia - Scientists exploring an isolated jungle in one of Indonesia's most remote provinces discovered dozens of new species of frogs, butterflies and plants — as well as mammals hunted to near extinction elsewhere, members of the expedition said Tuesday. The team also found wildlife that were remarkably unafraid of humans during its rapid survey of the Foja Mountains, an area in eastern Indonesia's Papua province with more than two million acres of old growth tropical forest, said Bruce Beehler, a co-leader of the monthlong trip.

    Two Long-beaked Echidnas, a primitive egg-laying mammal, simply allowed scientists to pick them up and bring them back to their camp to be studied, he said. The December expedition to Papua on the western side of New Guinea island was organized by the U.S.-based environmental organization Conservation International and the Indonesian Institute of Sciences. "There was not a single trail, no sign of civilization, no sign of even local communities ever having been there," said Beehler, adding that two headmen from the Kwerba and Papasena tribes, the customary landowners of the Foja Mountains, accompanied the expedition.

    http://tinyurl.com/c2hrd
     
  2. Amraann

    Amraann Former Member

    Messages:
    9,705
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh this is neat!!!


    My Teenage son will think this is cool.
     
  3. Marine Mom

    Marine Mom New Member

    Messages:
    1,649
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I read this article this morning. How cool. Animals that have never been in contact with humans so they weren't afraid.

    Now, they need to get out and stay out. Looks like things are just fine without humans interferring. Not everything on this earth needs to be studied to death.

    JMO
     
  4. Buzz Mills

    Buzz Mills New Member

    Messages:
    23,626
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    How amazing is that---a world without fear; wouldn't that be a wonderful place to live.
     
  5. Marine Mom

    Marine Mom New Member

    Messages:
    1,649
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    (sigh) Well said.
     

Share This Page



  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice