Settlement reached in lawsuit over disqualification of bisexual players

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by TrackerSam, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. TrackerSam

    TrackerSam New Member

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    Okay. I played with the title which should read -
    Settlement reached in lawsuit over disqualification of bisexual players from Gay Softball World Series

    A lawsuit stemming from the disqualification of a team featuring three bisexual players at the 2008 Gay Softball World Series has been settled. The case pitted the three plaintiffs, who were veterans of the San Francisco Gay Softball League against the North American Gay Amateur Athletic Alliance.

    The players were brought into a conference room and asked prying questions about their personal lives, including whether they were "predominantly" interested in men or women. When one player said he was attracted to both men and women, a NAGAAA member stated "this is not a bisexual world series - this is a gay world series."

    The team was disqualified from its second place finish after a committee ruled that the three plaintiffs were "believed to be heterosexual."

    As part of the settlement, the NAGAAA recognized that the ruling was counter to its stated intention of being inclusive of bisexual players. The team's second place trophy will be awarded and records will be amended to reflect the players' participation.

    LaRon Charles, one of the plaintiffs in the case, said. “I am happy NAGAAA has also made rule changes to let players like me know they are welcome. I look forward to continuing to play ball with my friends, teammates and community in NAGAAA’s tournaments.”

    http://www.q13fox.com/news/kcpq-set...ld-series-20111128,0,6462106.story?hpt=ju_bn6

    The intolerant hags at NAG.:floorlaugh:
     
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  3. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    As most people here know, I am openly gay. I spent Thanksgiving with the founders of our local gay band and they were discussing this very issue (in principle--I don't think anyone present knew about the softball lawsuit).

    EVERY minority faces a challenge and the risk of being assimilated to the point of annihilation as it gains mainstream acceptance. But as a member of one type of minority, I don't think maintaining our identity is worth becoming as bigoted as the people who once oppressed us.

    If somebody wants to play in a gay band or on a gay softball team, let 'em! And don't ask personal questions that are really nobody's business.
     
  4. TrackerSam

    TrackerSam New Member

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    Thank you. That's exactly the point I was trying to make.
     
  5. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    Sam, there is another side to the argument: minorities are often overshadowed and overwhelmed by the sheer numbers of the majority. (Imagine if Christians suddenly decided to show up en masse at synagogues! How long would Judaism survive?)

    And there is some legitimate sensitivity about the label "bisexual" in the gay community. For several generations, some gay people claimed to be "bisexual" because they perceived that to be "less gay" and therefore more desirable and socially acceptable. Many gay people are still sensitive on the subject.

    But for me, at least, none of this outweighs our need to practice the tolerance we demand from others.
     

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