Severe weather warnings change today

Discussion in 'Weather' started by mysteriew, Apr 2, 2012.

  1. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    Starting Monday in Missouri and Kansas, Tornado Warnings will be peppered with sentences like, "mass devastation is highly likely, making the area unrecognizable to survivors," Or even: "This storm is not survivable." Messages such as, "Complete destruction of entire neighborhoods is likely" may get more people posting on social networking sites and taking instant action according the NWS. The new warnings will be tested in the two states through November 30.

    Read more: http://www.wcpo.com/dpp/weather/wea...e-weather-warnings-change-today#ixzz1qvJN1oF0

    Just what I need to scare me even more
     
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  3. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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  4. legalmania

    legalmania Verified Paralegal

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    So long as they have time to get out, or get to a safe place.
    They test the sirens around here all the time I don't know whether to run or relax. I'm usually looking out the windows like some kind of crazy neighborhood watch person.
     
  5. Herding Cats

    Herding Cats New Member

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    As soon as one storm is far stronger than they predict, they'll be sued for not warning people of the danger.

    I think that folks need to be ready for their own area's issues, and not rely on things like warning levels to get them to respond appropriately. Living in EQ country, we get no warnings, and they can be very destructive. My one and only warning comes from the ground - sometimes there is a bit of shaking before it gets stronger. Other than that, it's just like being in a popcorn popper.

    I don't know that this is a good change for the NWS. I know they're trying to save lives, but I am not sure it's going to quite work out that way...

    Best-
    herding Cats
     
  6. hollyblue

    hollyblue It may be the cock that crows, but it is the hen t

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    I hope it works because there are too many who did not heed the previous warnings. Especially young adults. They were too busy rubbernecking outside and looking out windows while playing with the cam corder, which messes with your perception. Most don't stop to think how fast the funnel can just drop....in mere seconds and throw debrise right smack through you. imo
     
  7. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    I'm glad the warnings have changed. Meteorologist Gary England warned people in the 1999(?) F-5 tornado in Oklahoma was NOT survivable above ground. This gave people in the path time to leave or take shelter. I really and truly believed Gary saved many lives that day.

    I really doubt the warnings will be used unless necessary.

    Living in tornado alley I pay attention to watches which can become warnings quickly. No matter where I am during severe weather season, driving, shopping etc. I automatically look for shelter. Hubby and I have our NOAA radio on and watch the news. I can't tell you how many nights we stayed up until the danger passed by as we didn't have a basement at the time.
     
  8. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    Not meant to scare you mysteriew, far too many people don't take watches and warnings seriously.

    Our warning system sounds once a month at the same time so when our sirens go off we take the warning seriously. (Although it did puzzle some foreign visitors once when the test sirens went off and no Americans paid attention. The visitors looked quite anxious until we explained it was only the monthly test.)
     
  9. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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  10. jjenny

    jjenny Active Member

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    WTF are you supposed to do when you hear "this storm is not survivable?"
     
  11. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    Go somewhere away from doors and windows, in a center room of your home, bend over and grab your ankles and kiss your a** goodbye???
     
  12. RLynne

    RLynne Verified Expert

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    The sirens are going off at my house right now...they test them weekly at noon on Wednesday from March to September-ish. But I still jump every time I hear them.

    I like the new proposed warning system. I think it's good to know if I should be freaked out, or hit total absolute panic mode (I am seriously freaked out by storms, and tornadoes in particular--I have recurring nightmares about getting sucked up by one).
     
  13. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    In a basement if possible, sitting against the wall. Cover your head with bike helmet, mattress, blankets or hands. Houses can collapse inside basements so think of what is called the golden triangle. If you are against the wall chances are the wall, floor and collapse floor will form a small safe triangle. If you a small windowless closet or bathroom in basement go there.

    If you've got the time get in a vehicle and move away from storm at right angles or go to the nearest sturdiest building you can.

    Lie flat in the lowest depression or ditch in the ground, especially if you are in a mobile home and have no other option. Cover your head.

    Stay alert during watches and especially warnings. You must access your danger and what to do. Listen to what the meteorologists say. Get a cheap NOAA weather radio. Our children had tornado plans, if we were not home at the time, and knew where to go and what to do.

    I've avoided tornadoes by taking cover in grandma's root cellar, getting in car and driving away from a oncoming tornado when at a no bathroom rest stop, getting in car and driving to a basement a few streets away. If tornado had been closer we would have chosen the 8 foot ditch 100 feet away.
     
  14. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    I did two for many years until hubby and I took spotter classes twenty years ago and started chasing them. (We only chase close to home and are very, very careful considerate chasers.) Every spring to summer I had many nightmares, one in particular was being in a glass house on a flat plain with multiple tornadoes coming at me! When we learned more about tornadoes and started chasing them my nightmares disappeared. Any dreams I have of tornadoes at this point is I can't catch them or when I do the tornado is so small it fits in the palm of my hand!
     
  15. legalmania

    legalmania Verified Paralegal

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  16. legalmania

    legalmania Verified Paralegal

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    I for one wouldn't live on Tornado Alley. They recommend you get to the lowest part of your house and try to be where there are no windows.
     
  17. Show Me

    Show Me New Member

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    You get used to it. Some years very little activity in your area, other years too much.

    People here can't fathom living in an earthquake, tsunami or hurricane zone!

    What scares me most is earthquakes....no warning. And I have lived in Southern California growing up and slept through any earthquake in my area.
     

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