She's back again!

Discussion in 'Bizarre and Off-Beat News' started by gman20001969, May 29, 2007.

  1. Taximom

    Taximom Former Member

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    Years ago, my daughter brought home two books from the school Accelerated Reader program (for 7th grade) that really opened my eyes about what's available for our children to read at school.

    One involved a teenage girl involved w/the married guy next door, and missing (and if I remember correctly, murdered) girls. The other involved the attempted murder of a supposed homosexual teen boy after a group of brats took his pants down and ridiculed him about his penis. :eek: That one had lots of words in it that we don't say in our home. (The best part was that these were from a Lutheran private school library! lol)

    These books weren't attempts at making children in 7th grade understand adultery or homophobia. They were purely fiction supposedly for their reading enjoyment. :rolleyes: Needless to say, my daughter returned those the next day.

    As a parent, it is my job to be aware of what my children are reading, and my choice (for a few years anyway) as to what they read. Not the government!

    There should be a law against lawyers and people filing lawsuits like this.
     


  2. rayray

    rayray Former Member

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    Some of the best pieces of literature have been notoriously banned or challenged in schools and libraries across the country. Honestly, with the state of our country's literacy.. if my child wants to read. READ.
    (I am a future teacher.)
    From the ALA: here are the top 25 challenged books
    1. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    2. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Daddy's Roommate by Michael Willhoite[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    3. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    4. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    5. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    6. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    7. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    8. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Forever by Judy Blume[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    9. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    10. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Alice (Series) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    11. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    12. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    13. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    14. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]The Giver by Lois Lowry[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    15. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]It's Perfectly Normal by Robie Harris[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    16. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    17. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]A Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Newton Peck[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    18. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]The Color Purple by Alice Walker[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    19. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Sex by Madonna[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    20. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Earth's Children (Series) by Jean M. Auel[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    21. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    22. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    23. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Go Ask Alice by Anonymous[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    24. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers[/SIZE][/SIZE]
    25. [SIZE=-1][SIZE=-1]In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak[/SIZE][/SIZE]
     
  3. Mr. E

    Mr. E Well-Known Member

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    I think JK Rowling herself has said, and then Hermione Granger in one of the books, that the best way to ensure that people will read something is to tell them they can't read it. I imagine Harry Potter is more popular than ever in Mallory's hometown.
     
  4. MagicRose99

    MagicRose99 Watch out for my thorns!

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    <snip from above>
    "Personally, I don't think it's a good idea to raise a whole generation of witches," Mallory said. "I don't think it's good for our country."

    Only a "looney tune" would make a comment like this. She obviously doesn't have all of her marbles. Any person in their right mind would realize that FICTION means "make believe" and not fact.... If that statement were true, we'd have millions of witches and warlocks running around...
     
  5. LaWanda

    LaWanda Professional Lurker

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    This lady is sooo of her rocker. She should understand the difference between FICTION and NON FICTION.

    Ya know, we should all use our FLOO Powder and show up in her fireplace ...

    I am in Georgia as well, (Actually gman is my hubby) and I have all the HP books. I have gone to Books-A-Million at midnight on release day to get them as they come out and will do the same for book 7. We've gone to see the movies when they come out, at the IMAX theater. I am a big fan of Harry Potter. I think she needs to read the books and see what they are all about!
     
  6. Glow

    Glow Active Member

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    One of the best parenting decisions my mother ever made was to allow me unlimited access to any and all written material. I'm not sure if that was a conscious decision or if she was too overwhelmed to keep track of all 6 of us and our reading habits!

    The house my parents bought when I was 7 had two huge built in bookshelves and the people who moved left the books. Over the years I slowly worked my way through most of what proved to be a very eclectic library. Books on politics, farmers almanacs, Guiness world records, Readers Digest bound selections etc...there was even an old leather bound copy of "Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm." As a young girl, I thought the life of the Bronte sisters was SO romantic in a frugal kind of way, and wished it was my own. This in no way however dampened my enjoyment of "true crime" and "movie magazines" available when I went with my mother to the hairdressers on a Saturday morning!

    Even now I can recall my fascination with H. G. Wells "The Island of Doctor Moreau" and "The War of the Worlds" what great science fiction! There was a wealth of places to visit and ways of thinking to explore. It helped me learn how to think. How to have a global view instead of just a local one. Books helped me to develop my budding sense of who I was. That was true of the "fluff" and the "trashy" and the controversial"stuff as well as the "good" literature. There is a knowing of oneself that happens in the process of reading and sorting out in your own mind what it is that you think about the words on the page.

    I have 4 children and it was my hope that at a young age I could encourage in them through the use of books, the desire to be"life long learners". Our home has always been one with books every where you turn. On every possible topic. I never had to limit or restrict what they could read, although I reserved that parental option had I needed to.

    I know that is just my exerience and maybe I would have had to modify that had one of my children developed an excessively one sided interest in questionable topic to the exclusion of all else. That never happened however. I just encouraged variety and the rest seemed to sort itself out.

    It saddens me to read about anyone who would want to carve out ANY type of literature as being inappropriate. When I read over RayRay's list above, I coudn't help but think of how "cheated" we would all be if attempts to remove those books had been successful.
     
  7. JanetElaine

    JanetElaine Well-Known Member

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    LOL That's the first thing I did when way-back-when Salman Rushdie's Satanic Verses got banned - I went and bought it (all sneaky under the counter in the bookstore, lmao). Then I quit reading after 4 pages because it was boring as anything. If it hadn't been banned I wouldn't have wasted my money on it. :mad: LOL
     
  8. JanetElaine

    JanetElaine Well-Known Member

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    Are they really? So the next time they won't let us in I can demand to be let in? (Not arguing with you, this happened to us, I genuinly want to know :)).
     
  9. Glow

    Glow Active Member

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    Hey LaWanda! SO gman is your hubby ;)

    That is pretty cool to know.

    You should post that on the thread about S.O.'s here at WS!
     
  10. rayray

    rayray Former Member

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    I have been an AVID (usually a book a day) reader my entire life. I was never sheltered or "protected" from such risque material as "Are You There God, Its Me, Margaret". I think that alot of people forget that READING IS EDUCATING ONESELF. How many people have learned things from reading that they were afraid to talk about with their parents, or ashamed of feeling, etc. IT SADDENS and ENRAGES me to have people ban and challenge literature.

    BTW.. interesting fact .. Judy Blume is one of the most challenged authors EVER.
     
  11. Mr. E

    Mr. E Well-Known Member

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    I was raised the same way. The only book my father wouldn't let me read was The Mephisto Waltz, which I quickly stole off his bookshelf and read. To this day I don't know why he banned it. I told this story to my daughter (she's 15 now, but was probably 14 when I told the story), and she also wanted to read the book. Like me, she couldn't figure out the big deal.

    I'd like to know where all the Harry Potter-inspired covens are popping up. I've been to a lot of Harry Potter parties. The most "magical" thing I have seen is rod pretzles covered in white chocolate and sprinkles to make edible "wands."
     
  12. kygal

    kygal Former Member

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    Well, for that I am speaking from my experiences around here. It's none too odd for a parent around here to take a 10 or younger kid into a rated R movie and watch it with them. They've always let them here. I don't always think it's too great of an idea (but I'd really have to want to watch it to go in the first place), but at least they are with them and it's THEIR CHOICE.

    The same thing with the "explicit lyrics" cd's and the rated video games. I used to work for a large retail company, and they WILL sell the stuff to kids under 17 as long as the parents are there and give their permission and ID. I know that because I was nearly fired for NOT wanting to do it.
    If parents don't care if their kids have it, there is no real way of stoping them no matter what you do.
     
  13. IrishMist

    IrishMist You can't control the wind - but you can adjust yo

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    I'm thinking that he just wanted to make sure you read it :)
     
  14. angelmom

    angelmom The love stays...forever in our hearts

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    LOL! We were just talking about the book Forever and how much we learned from that one. One of my friends who is just a few years older than me had no idea what I was talking about...she must have been too old for it when it came out and missed it. She has a 12yo DD now and I said it was a must read (for the mom...DD can read it sometime in the near future).

    I remember reading Wifey at a house where I babysat...every Saturday night I'd read a few more chapters and then slip it back onto the shelf, and memorize what page I was on.

    JB is the best growing up author!
     
  15. rayray

    rayray Former Member

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    Omg Angelmom, I just read Wifey and SummerSisters.. Her grown up books are Dirrrty :)
     
  16. angelmom

    angelmom The love stays...forever in our hearts

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    Summer Sisters! I was trying to remember the name of that one! I read that over Spring Break my senior year of high school.

    My DH owes JB a lot...and he doesn't even know it. :angel:
     
  17. philamena

    philamena Former Member

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    You raised by wonderful parent's it seems.
     
  18. JanetElaine

    JanetElaine Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm.... this is turning into a thread about which books to add to my summer list! :D
     
  19. angelmom

    angelmom The love stays...forever in our hearts

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    Well, if you want some fun summer reading, pick up Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum books...and read them in order.

    Steamy mysteries...what more could a WS girl ask for???
     
  20. timetravel

    timetravel care giver of all stray and feral cats who come my

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    I, too, grew up an avid reader - i remember walking to the library and taking out the maximum ten books allowed - then returning them all two days later for ten more - and I read every single one of them!!! There were no restrictions on what we read - from books to comics to magazines - I remember reading my mom's "true story" magazines when i was ten years old - quite fascinating - I also perused old medical books with fascinating photos of grotesque medical conditions - like the woman with the humungous goiter.....
    My daughter could read by age three....I never restricted her from reading whatever she wanted - for the most part, she had no interest in things over her head - she and my 14 yr. old son are avid harry potter fans (books and movies) while I have no interest in the fantasy realm. Neither kid is a witch or warlock, or want sto "be" one....my son is heavily into video games, and anime, too - but he abhors violence in the real world and will do his utmost to protect defenseless animals against cruelty - he has always been able to recognize the difference between reality and fantasy......
    in the meantime this lady's kids will probably grow up thinking this crap is for real....
     

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