Snake Bites Woman Walking Through Wal-Mart Garden Center

Discussion in 'Bizarre and Off-Beat News' started by Beyond Belief, Jun 1, 2006.

  1. Beyond Belief

    Beyond Belief New Member

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    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- All she wanted was a flower, but instead a woman said she got a snake bite
    Delaine Jarrell was looking through the plants in the garden center at a Jacksonville Wal-Mart on Wednesday, when a snake sunk its fangs into her arm and didn't let go without a fight.


    "He finally broke loose and, thank goodness for sweat pants with elastic on them, because he tried to climb up my britches' leg," Jarrell said.



    Jarrell went to the emergency room two days later when she noticed red streaks running down her arm.



    Fortunately, the snake wasn't poisonous
    http://www.wftv.com/news/9305190/detail.html
     
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  3. mysteriew

    mysteriew A diamond in process

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    LOL, I guess I had better be more careful in the gardening section.
    It sounds a little suspicious to me. She sees the snake but doesn't file a police report or seek emergency treatment for two days? How do they know the snake wasn't poisonous?
     
  4. Amraann

    Amraann Former Member

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    I love how the media headline is "women walking"

    She wasn't walking she was looking through the plants.
    It happens every so often..

    Mysteriew I am guessing she gave a description??
    Probably a black racer.
     
  5. englishleigh

    englishleigh Authentic Southern Belle

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    Exactly, I would have run screaming out of there straight to the ER!!!!! Or fainted so that they would have had to call 911!
     
  6. Jean

    Jean Former Member

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    OH MY GOD--I would have had a heart attack, no doubt about it! I am scared to death of snakes. OH, OH!!!! :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:
     
  7. ljwf22

    ljwf22 Reality continues to ruin my life.

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    Me too! And I'd probably avoid gardening centers. :hand:
     
  8. 2XL

    2XL New Member

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    NOT only would they have called for 911, they would most certainly called for "CLEAN UP ON ISLE ONE OF THE GARDEN CENTER", Cause I would have **** myself!!!!
     
  9. cheko1

    cheko1 New Member

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    I'm with you......they'd of had an ambulance / I'd of had a heart attack along with the snake bite & chitting my pants! :slap:
     
  10. deanws

    deanws Former Member

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    OMGosh Jean I am too! I am a real weenie when it comes to snakes!!!! :( :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:
     
  11. BhamMama

    BhamMama Former Member

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    What I don't understand, she knew it was a snake yet didn't go get care for two days? Did they call the paramedics I wonder? There is a level of care you have to have after a bite from any animal. Esp a snake bite. They have to have the snake to determine what kind of care. Depending on how their teeth are, forward curving vs straight ect.

    I'm a herp (
    herpetology) lover but I do have a healthy respect for what they can do as well. I never pick one up if I know it is dangerous and have picked up more garter snakes and brown snakes weeding than any other time.

    About the only thing I'm afeered of are
    [size=-1]Palmetto bugs, I turn into a screaming little girl if they get anywhere near me lol
    [/size]
     
  12. mssheila

    mssheila New Member

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    FOR SURE! I would have fainted! Either before or after I peed my pants.
     
  13. Nova

    Nova Active Member

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    If Mama's post doesn't just sum up human nature, I don't know what!

    It's always something, isn't it?
     
  14. deanws

    deanws Former Member

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    Are you going to tell me that PEEING is all you would do in those pants? I must be more afraid of snakes than you are!
    :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
     
  15. oceanblueeyes

    oceanblueeyes Well-Known Member

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    Well one thing is for certain whomever wrote this article doesn't know beans about snakes. Non-poisonous snakes do not have "fangs" ever. Snakes that have fangs carry venom and are poisonous. So please if you see a snake or kill one and open its mouth and it has fangs then you can consider yourself lucky that you got them before they got you or your pet! Always remember poisonous snakes have spaded heads as this is where venom is stored and the eyes are slanted not round.

    Now non-poisonous snakes will try to bite you but they have nothing to pierce the skin with like a poisonous snake..they will try to chew but they dont have teeth per se but a tiny bony ridge used for chewing up small prey. The only one that can harm you that chews if attached to say a finger is the Coral Snake but those bites are very rare.

    BUT...BUT...it could have been a green plastic snake and Wally World Garden Center would have to rebuild if this happened to me!

    My father used to catch rattlesnakes and ship them to the University of Texas as the venom is used for medicinal purposes. Now who do you think had to hold that darned burlap bag when he dropped those huge diamondbacks in the sack? Thats right lol and I have a phobia of snakes and will absolutely think I am going to have a heart attack if I see one. I cant even stand to see them in a Zoo.

    Now I know my hubby will be checking all plants before I purchase them! LOL

    Sorry for my "snake class" but I take snakes very seriously. lol

    IMO

    Ocean
     
  16. ellen13

    ellen13 New Member

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    Oceanblueeyes-

    that was a good lesson on snakes! thank you!

    just one thing-i heard that you don't call a snake poisonous,

    you only call it "venomous" and that poisonous refers more to

    like poisonous frogs, etc. just a thought. but i definitely liked

    your lesson on the fangs. good to know for sure!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    did you read about the pilot who found one in the cockpit while flying?

    I'm deathly afraid of snakes, but fascinated at the same time.
     
  17. oceanblueeyes

    oceanblueeyes Well-Known Member

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    Hi Ellen,

    Yes they are venomous for sure...the literature uses both terminologies.

    No I did not hear that but it gives me goosebumps just thinking about it.

    I had a non-venomous snake thrown on me as a sick joke when I was 19. It had just been killed and was still moving. Well when the stupid guy flung it at me it wrapped around my neck. I had my back to the guy and didn't see it coming. I think this helped to seal the phobia I have. To say the least he became my ex-friend lol.

    I do know though the best thing to do for your children is to educate them about snakes. People are bitten by "thinking" the snake is non-venomous when sadly too late they are mistaken. The Pygmy rattler is one that is often "thought" to be non-poisonous or a "baby" snake when at 18 inches it is full of venom and grown.

    As you say they can be found anywhere. I would venture to say the Wally snake came all the way from the plant nursery via truck and into garden center.

    Sheesh now I have to work in my flower garden today! Wish me luck! :D
     
  18. ellen13

    ellen13 New Member

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    and you're in the south-what do you have down there? cottonmouths (water moccasins) rattlers, do you have coral snakes?? What's your biggest concern in your own garden??Not a lot going on up here in Michigan in terms of snakes- only really rattlers and they're not very big-haven't seen one here-only in the zoo. But, I'll definitely think differently about Wally World and plant shops. I never saw a pygmy rattler before or maybe I did. Have you ever visited the Rattlesnake Museum in Albuquerque NM?? They have a thousand different types. My favorites were the albinos. I like any animal that is albino, like the albino alligators-pretty to look at. I also heard that the babies hold the most powerful venom. Is that true?
     
  19. BhamMama

    BhamMama Former Member

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    No babies venom is not more potent than an adults. The amount they can create is adjusted for their size. But venom is venom, dangerous in any amount. Some snakes have more potent venom only because of their prey. Some venom is more apt to be more dangerous, say the kind that eats your skin or dissolves muscle. Those are not common in the Americas. Most venom paralyzes you by preying on your nervous system. To be bit by one is very painful!

    We do have coral snakes in the south. The old rhyme, red on yellow will kill a fellow, red on black, venom lack is one you learn at an early age. The rhyme is because we have snakes that mimic the coral snake in an attempt to keep from being eaten. The kingsnake at first glance looks like a coral but black touches red so it's not.

    Here in Alabama there are three varities of rattlesnakes, Timber, Dusky pigmy and Carolina pigmy. We do have Cotton Mouths, but unlike the stories, they don't throw themselves into boats lol. They more than likely just fell off a branch hanging over the water. We also have copperheads, they are everywhere and I see these more than any other kind out in the fields.

    I must correct one thing, non venomous snakes can indeed have teeth, most do. Short, thin, straight teeth, some have large back fangs that break open eggs. Some are large teeth in front, they are curved to bring their prey into their mouths and to hold on to the prey. The only difference between a non venomous snakes teeth and a venomous snakes teeth are that venomous teeth have a groove or venom channel in them and they are hollow while non venomous teeth are solid. Some fangs are fixed, meaning they don't move, some are hinged, meaning they fold up into the roof of the mouth. That description pertains to viper fangs.

    Never assume that any snake does not have teeth and you are safe! Though the bites are not venomous, they are painful!

    And remember, snakes are deaf. They 'hear' by vibration. A sleeping snake is more dangerous than one thats awake. That's because a sudden appearance will cause it to jerk awake and if you are too close, strike. But most would rather run from you than bite you. And they can't tell the difference between human and animal when you startle it.

    I understand why folks kill snakes and ask questions later but it doesn't change the fact that they are needed and I get upset when someone just kills one and they are not causing trouble. They control the rat population, the insect population and are a very vital part of our eco system.

    I find them fasinating and own a few, all non venomous, but I do own a constrictor, a rosey boa. She's a lovely example of a herp. One of my favorite snakes is an African House Snake. Non aggressive, stays small, very calm and fun. When my kids express an interest it's the first snake they are allowed to hold. The more they are held the less they are apt to bite. Of course my kids are taught to NEVER pick up a wild snake or a snake that is sleeping, ever!
     
  20. oceanblueeyes

    oceanblueeyes Well-Known Member

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    We have Diamondback rattlers, Pygmy, timber or Cane- break rattlers. We have cottonmouth and copperhead moccasins. We also have the Coral Snake. In fact each year in February about 40 miles from here is the largest rattlesnake roundup in the US.

    But I beg to differ with you on your interpretations of "fangs". Fangs are only found in venomous snakes as the fangs are retracted inside the mouth until such time they need them to attack their prey as their jaws are opened it causes the fangs to project forward in a curved design, this is to inject and hold prey.

    Most non poisonous snakes do not have massive teeth...in fact when inspecting most non-poisonous snakes it is hard to detect the teeth... Much larger snakes such as boas, and other constrictors do have teeth and even though they have no venom in them the bite can be dangerous as the wounds can be deep.

    Many of the non-poisonous snakes that eat eggs are able to crush shell by the constriction of their jaws which is usually powerful. Snakes have the uncanny ability to unlock their jaws to compensate for the size of the prey. I have seen snakes swallow the egg whole.

    Do you have a link that non-poisonous snakes have "fangs" (excluding the venom channel in fang) just like a rattler, moccasin or whatever? I have never known of any that do and would be interested in seeing it. Thanks.

    IMO

    Ocean
     
  21. BhamMama

    BhamMama Former Member

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    Not all vipers have retractable fangs, some are not hinged at all. Viperdae are the only ones that fold their teeth up. That's because they are longer than other fangs and the snake has to retract them or risk being punctured by their own fangs.

    There are three types of venomous snakes: opysthoglyph, proteroglyph and solenoglyph.

    The first, opysthoglyph are mildly venomous and have back grooved teeth with a groove, example a mangrove snake.

    The second, proteroglyph have small, fixed, non moveable fangs in front. ie Coral snakes.

    Solenoglyph have large, foldable front fangs rattlesnakes, copperheads, cottonmouths are all vipers with retractable fangs.

    Snakes that have teeth, non retactable curving and solid: With one exception right off the top of my head,

    http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/snakeinfo.asp

    The eastern hognose snake also has enlarged non-venomous fangs located in the rear of its mouth which are used for deflating toads, their favorite prey. Fangs are not found in all snakes, but all snakes do have teeth, usually six rows worth. The teeth are curved backwards, just like the barbs on a fishing hook, which keeps their prey from escaping.

    But notice I said, thin, short and straight too. This is most snakes. But I can guarentee that all are not nearly naked to the eye.
    The blue racer snake has large front recurved front teeth for instance. My constrictor has really big teeth that hurt when being bit, african house snakes have recurved teeth that are very sharp. Diamondback water snakes have lots of really sharp teeth. Most contrictors have large front teeth, because their prey is usually bigger than themselves, it helps them bring it in. Most aquatic snakes have large teeth to help them hold their slippery prey. Even gartersnakes have sharp teeth that hurt. You can't make a blanket statement that non venomous snakes have tiny teeth or just a boney ridge.

    I never said that all snakes have fangs, I said that they have teeth. I mistyped in my description above and meant large front teeth in that one instance but the other is correct. But yes, there are snakes that have back fangs to break open eggs. The others are just teeth, some not so small. Though I'm not also totally wrong:

    Aglyphs
    Maxillary teeth are solid, they have no groove or canal. The size may be equal or evenly graded with the largest teeth posterior, or may have the posterior ones abruptly enlarged and fanglike. Aglyphs may also have anterior fangs.
    - all nonvenomous snakes belong to this group.

    http://www.snakebite-firstaid.com/facts.html

    But Aglyphs also include some venomous snakes, it means non grooved. So some have to 'gnaw' at their prey, time consuming to say the least. That would include Blind snakes and some colubrids.

    Having no chewing abilities, all snakes swallow their food whole.

    [font=arial,helvetica,verdana]I just wanted folks to know that yes, non venomous snakes can and do have teeth not to would be dangerous to state because some wouldnt go to the doctor if they thought it was non venomous and got bit. A snake bite is dangerous no matter what snake bit them. Mouth rot or if they'd just eaten with pieces of meat or hair stuck to their teeth can make someone sick.

    [/font]
     

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