Springfield Three - Media Links NO DISCUSSION

Discussion in 'The Springfield Three' started by suspicious mind, Apr 22, 2009.

  1. suspicious mind

    suspicious mind New Member

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    Originally Posted by pittsburghgirl
    Not to interrupt the discussion, but I want to re-post important links. I was getting around to making a new post about that anyway, but now that we have a new thread, it is important to re-capture this stuff, before thread 2 sinks into the posting abyss.

    KY3 Story with timeline

    http://www.ky3.com/home/related/5993556.html

    Other KY3 stories

    http://www.ky3.com/home/related/5993786.html

    http://www.ky3.com/home/related/1695137.html

    http://www.ky3.com/home/related/7876067.html

    Springfield PD website

    http://www.ci.springfield.mo.us/sPD/GeneralInfo/3missingwomen.html

    Original Police Report

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/documents/report.pdf

    KSPR Missing in the Ozarks

    http://www.kspr.com/internal?st=prin...youlive/greene

    News-Leader 5-part Series

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/day1.html

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/day2.html

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/day3.html

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/day4.html

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/day5.html

    Robert Cox Letters

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/documents/CoxMay97.pdf

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/documents/CoxMay02.pdf

    http://springfield.news-leader.com/specialreports/threemissingwomen/day1_cox.html

    Story that includes video of crime scene

    http://ozarksfirst.com/content/fulltext/?cid=8217

    Since we have a new handy forum, I thought it would be a good idea to start a thread to keep all media links. I hope pittsburghgirl doesn't mind me moving her post here.
     
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  3. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    I am thrilled. I was going to ask about a sticky or somesuch, but this is great. I'd lick to see posts with pics, etc. on this thread. The whole magilla.
     
  4. MaryLiz

    MaryLiz New Member

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    Thanks for posting that, suspicious mind..I was going to suggest pittsburghgirl put a separate thread for media links since she posted all those at the beginning of Thread #3. I'm glad someone did it. I want to start looking through the old Kansas City Star articles to see if there are any we don't have on here and hopefully add them to this media links section. The old KC Star articles aren't free so it may be slow going but I still want to search and see if I can find ones that were never posted on here. Thanks again!
     
  5. DD Byrd

    DD Byrd Member

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    I can't get most of the links to work. Does anyone have that picture of the floor plan of the house?
     
  6. suspicious mind

    suspicious mind New Member

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    OK :crazy: I fixed the links. Apparently when I moved the post over, the links were copied verbatim which excluded portions of the links b/c when you post a url it does a "..." to save space....well, long story short, they are fixed!

    Hurricane uploaded a version printed by the NL to a file sharing site, here is the link:

    http://www.mediafire.com/?hkmgm2y0kno

    But, it says the file is "private"?
     
  7. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    I posted this just after the media links on Thread 3, so that some of the frequently-asked questions and points of discussion would not get lost as Thread 2 fades into the past. Most important, I think, are the Kansas City Star articles posted by tangledweb.

    Post re: phone call to Sherrill, by MM, p. #175—Thread 2

    Story that quotes a different time for the final call, from KY3;

    http://www.ky3.com/features/rewind/19602564.html

    Post re: Bartt, by tangledweb, Thread 2, p. 16 #387

    Post re: Gerald Carnahan, from Gaia227, Thread 2, page 22, #545

    Post quoting Kansas City Star article, “FBI theorizes Person was trusted by at least one of missing women”, by tangledweb, Thread 2, p. 30, #750

    Posts with complete Kansas City Star articles, from 1992, by tangledweb, Thread 2, p. 50, # 1236, 1237, 1239. Includes information about convenience store sighting and the girls leaving the parties.

    Post: Hurricane quoting News-Leader re: AMW call, Thread 2, page32, post #776

    Post with pics of Sherrill and Suzie's home, by Suspicious Minds, Thread 2, p. 27, #910

    Post with citation re: Failed polygraph test, by Cambria, Thread 2, pg. 41, #1022.

    A few posts above there is a list of people who supposedly passed the polygraph; original by Hurricane, p. 40, #998.
     
  8. Indianagirl

    Indianagirl New Member

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  9. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    Originally posted by Indianagirl, #688 on Thread 3:


    "Police speculate sexual assault may have been the motive, with Levitt the intended victim."
    Jefferson City News-Tribune (MO)
    June 9, 2002

    It would be interesting to know why LE speculated that Levitt may have been the intended victim and not Suzie or Stacy. I know all of us on here have gone back and forth on who the intended victim was, but this is the first article that I have read with LE speculating on a sex motive and naming the intended victim. This makes me wonder if LE does think there is a good chance the perp(s) was already in the house when the girls arrived home. If the perp(s) wasn't already in the house, why discount Suzie or Stacy as the intended victim?
     
  10. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    This is a post by Indianagirl recopied from Thread 3, post #689:

    This is the only information I could find about this van. There seems to be a few discrepancies in the reporting on the van, as the below articles' state, a "couple" had the van and it was taken from a "home".

    VAN MAY YIELD CLUES IN CASE OF MISSING WOMEN
    Author: By Bill Bryan
    "A Dodge Ram van found abandoned in a campground in Indiana might be involved in the baffling disappearance in June 1992 of three women from Springfield, Mo., authorities said Saturday.
    The 1985 blue van with a camper top will be processed by the Indiana State Police to retrieve possible evidence, authorities said.
    The van, without its license plates, was discovered Thursday in a public campground off U.S. Highway 50 about eight miles east of Versailles, Ind. A computer check of the van's vehicle identification number by the Ripley County (Ind.) sheriff's office showed that the van was stolen from Springfield on the same day that the three women disappeared, said Sgt. Bill Davison of the sheriff's office.
    Springfield police declined to give further details.
    Davison said the van had been brought to the campground this summer by a couple who also drove a pickup. At some point, the couple left the campground, leaving the van behind, he said."
    St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    October 31, 1993


    Police find no link to van, missing women Vehicle recovered in Indiana was stolen same time as abduction in Springfield.
    Author: The Associated Press
    SPRINGFIELD - "Authorities in Indiana have recovered a van that disappeared about the same time last year as three Springfield women.
    But police say they don't believe it is linked to the unsolved abduction case.
    "It's important because it was stolen around the same time as the women disappeared, and criminals sometimes like to use stolen vehicles," Capt. Todd Whitson said Saturday.
    "But that's the only connection to this case. It is not a major break. " Sherrill Levitt, her daughter, Suzanne Streeter, and Streeter's high school classmate, Stacy McCall, disappeared from Levitt's home on June 7, 1992.
    The dark blue 1985 Dodge conversion van was stolen from a home more than 20 blocks from Levitt's home sometime between June 4 and 9 of last year.
    The van was found Thursday in a recreational vehicle park in Ripley County in southeast Indiana, Whitson said. The driver of the van was not located, another official said.
    Indianapolis police will check the van for evidence and forward their findings to Springfield police.
    Though Whitson does not fully discount the importance of the van's discovery, police remain more interested in locating an early 1960s metallic green Dodge van believed used in the abduction."
    The Kansas City Star
    November 1, 1993
     
  11. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    Originally posted by tangledweb, Thread 2, p. 50


     
  12. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    Originally posted by tangledweb, Thread 2, p. 50:

     
  13. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    Originally posted by tangledweb, thread 2, page 50:

     
  14. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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  15. Indianagirl

    Indianagirl New Member

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    Tulsa World
    June 28, 1992
    Edition: FINAL HOME EDITION
    Section: NEWS
    Page: A8

    Investigators Remain Clueless in Case Of Missing Women
    Author: AP
    Article Text:
    SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) - Investigators wonder if some tiny, overlooked clue is buried in thousand of pages of police reports, or in fibers drawn from carpeting at the home where three women vanished.

    Three weeks of round-the-clock investigating have produced a few sketchy leads. But police say there's still no trace of what - or who - made Sherrill Levitt, her daughter, Suzie Streeter, and Stacy McCall disappear on June 7.
    "There are no theories that have been totally eliminated," said Capt. Tony Glenn, commander of the criminal investigations unit.

    Each woman's car remains parked outside Ms. Levitt's home. Inside, police found everything the women likely would have taken if they left town willingly: purses, cash, makeup, keys, identification, cigarettes and medication.

    Within a day of the June 8 missing-persons report, the Springfield Police Department threw about 30 officers onto the case.
    Still, investigators initially said there was no evidence of a crime.

    After three weeks, however, officers from Chief Terry Knowles down believe the women almost certainly were abducted. But they don't have enough evidence to focus on any one suspect, motive, theory or lead.
    Investigators theorize an abductor as an acquaintance or a stranger, a planner or an opportunist, one person or two.

    "To me, that's the most disconcerting thing about this case," detective Doug Thomas said. "In most cases we know what happened and why. We might not know who did it. But in this case, we don't even know why."

    A detective is assigned to study each victim, searching for anybody who might have a motive to harm one or more of them.
    Investigators continue to develop information, but nothing indicating trouble has been found so far, Glenn said.

    Ms. McCall, 18, and Ms. Streeter, 19, graduated from Kickapoo High School the night before they disappeared. They visited a few parties with friends, then left a friend's home in nearby Battlefield about 2:20 a.m., driving separate cars to the home of Ms. Levitt, a 47-year-old beautician.

    Friends who called the home got no answer at 7:30 a.m.

    By the time police were called, 18 friends and family members of the three women had entered the unlocked house, some unwittingly interfering with potential evidence. Investigators say they can't determine how far the interference may have set back their case. They have called the people back several times to help reconstruct the crime scene.

    A forensics team spent much of last week sifting through the house for fibers or other evidence that might prove valuable.

    Leads began to dwindle toward the end of the week. Crime analysts began poring page by page over reports stacked more than two feet thick. Analysts supervisor Sue Schofield said the team will look for inconsistencies and unanswered questions in interviews with more than 300 people.
     
  16. Indianagirl

    Indianagirl New Member

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    St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    June 14, 1992
    Edition: L5
    Section: NEWS
    Page: 1A

    Disappearance Of 3 Women Baffles Police
    No Clues: Abduction Suspected

    Author: By Tom Uhlenbrock
    Of the Post-Dispatch Staff
    Article Text:

    SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - Police Capt. Tony Glenn says he has slept with a notebook by his bed for the past week. ''Every 30 minutes, you wake up and write down something else you need to check,'' he said.

    Many of the town's residents have been spending restless nights because of the baffling disappearance of three women June 7 from a home in Springfield.

    The women - a mother, her daughter, and the daughter's friend - left behind their cars, purses, medication and the family Yorkshire terrier. The lights and television were on in the house, the beds looked slept-in, and the front door was unlocked.

    Police found nothing missing and no sign of blood or violence. Neighbors reported hearing or seeing nothing unusual.

    A weeklong search has found no trace of Sherrill Levitt, 47, her daughter, Suzanne E. Streeter, 19, and Streeter's friend, Stacy McCall, 18. Levitt missed a doctor's appointment on Monday, and none of the three showed up for work.

    ''This case has gone beyond a missing-persons case,'' police Chief Terry Knowles said late last week. ''I think there has been some form of abduction.''
    In an interview in his office, Glenn pieced together the events that led up to and followed the women's disappearance and described what he called the Police Department's ''full-court press'' to find them.

    Streeter, Levitt's daughter by the first of two marriages that ended in divorce, and McCall were seniors at Kickapoo High School. They attended graduation ceremonies the night before they disappeared.

    Levitt also attended the ceremonies and then returned to her modest home at 1717 East Delmar Street, saying she planned to hang wallpaper. A friend talked with her on the telephone at 9:15 p.m., the last time police can pinpoint her whereabouts.

    The younger women attended two parties and then returned to the Levitt house, where McCall was to spend the night. Their cars were parked on the circular drive in front.

    ''If they went directly from the parties, they would have arrived at the house at about 2:30 a.m.,'' said Glenn.

    At 7:30 that morning, friends went to the house after Streeter and McCall failed to show up for a trip to a water amusement park in nearby Branson, Mo. They found no one home.

    ''Their purses, makeup - all the things you need - were found in the home,'' the police captain said. He said that the shorts McCall had been wearing were found also.

    ''A pack of Marlboros was on the night stand next to Streeter's bed; she was said to be a chain smoker. The television set was on. We have been told that Streeter was an insomniac, and it was only normal for her to have turned the TV on, and the sound down, to sleep."

    ''Medication that McCall's family said she needed for migraines was found in the residence.''

    Because of the confusion caused by the busy schedule of events of the graduation weekend, Glenn said missing person reports were not filed with police by McCall's parents until 2:50 a.m. Monday, nearly 20 hours after friends found the house empty.

    During that time, 18 people - friends and relatives - went into the house, Glenn said, obscuring any clues that might have been left. ''We're still trying to piece together the degree of disturbance,'' he said.

    More than 30 police officers - including agents from the Springfield FBI office - have been working on the case. They are questioning hundreds of friends, relatives and business associates and following up the slimmest of leads.

    A smashed porch light at the house was found to have been broken previously. An auto theft in the neighborhood was determined to be unrelated. A multiple kidnapping in Oklahoma City was ruled out as a link when it was discovered that a child custody battle was involved in that case.

    A conference room on the second floor of police headquarters is being used as a command post for the search. Poster-size sheets of paper are taped to the four walls and scrawled with notes as a ''time line'' recording the work on the case.

    One reads: ''12:50: returned to HQ after search of Pearson Creek from Catalpa to junction of Jones River. Both banks and access area. Negative results.''
    Another says: ''Cults?''
    ''It's one of those things that we've checked into,'' said Glenn. ''What we're doing is eliminating things.

    ''We've questioned over 200 people, some more than once. Levitt works as a hair stylist; she has a good following. There's approximately 250 people in her client book, and we're interviewing every one of them.

    ''Yesterday, we searched the creek and a waste-water treatment plant on another of those 'you-need-to-look-at' tips.''

    Both girls dated, and their male friends and those who attended the graduation parties have been questioned. ''We're trying to reconstruct their lives, their social activities, their normal ways of doing things,'' he said.

    Police talked with Levitt's first husband but have been unable to find the second. A friend told police that Levitt had had no contact with her second husband, whom she divorced in 1989, and had not dated.

    ''We've broadcast the women's pictures nationally, and yesterday we got a call from Atlantic City, N.J.,'' Glenn said. ''Someone thought they had seen the Levitt woman board a plane. We never turn down anything.''

    But when asked whether police had any solid clues or suspects in the case, Glenn shook his head and said, ''None.''

    Glenn, a 23-year veteran of the department who has a young daughter himself, said the officers working the case remained optimistic.
    ''There's no reason not to be,'' he said. ''But later on, as time goes by and leads dwindle down. . . .''

    Officers have remained at Levitt's neatly kept, one-story house 24 hours a day. Streeter's shiny red Ford Escort with ''SWEETR'' plates sits in front, with McCall's red Toyota close behind. Levitt's blue Mitsubishi is in the carport, which is decorated with a hanging basket of red impatiens.

    In Streeter's bedroom, a gym bag of clothes sits unzipped on the floor. The room, including the ceiling, is plastered with pictures of Marilyn Monroe; Streeter, a blonde, has a job taking tickets at a local theater.

    McCall has a job at a health club. She has long chestnut hair, which creates a striking contrast to the wedding gowns she modeled as a part-time job.

    The aluminum screen door to the house is covered with the dark dust that police use to collect fingerprints. Inside, an officer was vacuuming in another search for evidence.

    Tom Cowens, a forensic technician with the police department, walked out carrying the tools of his trade. He glanced at a newspaper photographer recording his exit and said: ''What we're hoping is they come home and b**ch at us for messing up the house.''
     
  17. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    Missouri Mule posted this in Thread 3. It has views of the interior of the house at 1717 Delmar after the crimes, as well as exterior shots of the driveway. There are links to text copies above, but the URLs change from time to time.

    YouTube - KSPR Unsolved Cases Three Missing Women
     
  18. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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    These are technically not media links, but they are available resources about Bartt. tangledweb's post regarding Bartt, Thread 2, #387:

    Below is a partial chronology of Streeter's movements/life from the time he left Springfield up until May, 2008, where records show he's in arrears for back child support to the tune of $14,000.00.

    If LE were to reinvestigate Streeter, the people mentioned below would have first-hand info of what he has said about the 3MW case and what he has done since leaving Springfield, MO.

    Comparing that after-the-fact court-admissable information to what is already documented could shed new light on the case. I would also include his juvenile record up in Washington state since it would show Streeter's early mental state as a juvenile and may very well play into evidence in this case.

    08/31/2001 Docket Entry: Judge/Clerk - Note
    Text: APA WORSHAM WITHDRAWS DISMISSAL LETTER. PER MEB/TDT (MissouriCase.net)

    Sept. 15, 1992 Levitt's son, Bartt Streeter, considered an initial suspect, quits his job and leaves Springfield. He has not returned. It is the 100th day of the investigation. (SL news article)

    09/17/1992 Docket Entry: Judge/Clerk - Note
    Text: Notification from CASP that Deft has not completed program. tdt (MissouriCase.net)

    09/18/1992 Docket Entry: Judge/Clerk - Note
    Text: Deft. has not completed CASP. Issue warrant for prob. viola tion. bond set $1500.00. BJK jt (MissouriCase.net)

    09/25/1992 Docket Entry: Judge/Clerk - Note
    Text: Warrant issued, bond $1500.00. jt (MissouriCase.net)

    Address records show Streeter having lived in SHERWOOD, AR and then NORTH LITTLE ROCK, AR after he left Springfield, MO.

    On October 14, 1995, Tabetha Jo Price, age 20, daughter of Danny Gerald Price & Brenda Fay Maples was married to Bartt Loran Streeter, age 31, son of Brentt Merrill Streeter & Sherrill Elizabeth Williams. Streeter was born in Bellevue, Washington & Price was born in Conway, Arkansas. They were married by Robert F. Maples, minister in North Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas.

    http://www.pulaskiclerk.com/Marriage...r=OML100042352

    It appears that they were divorced in 1999.

    I've already documented elsewhere on this thread the November/2000 attempted kidnapping/coercion episode in Las Vegas, NV, but will post the links to the police reports again:


    http://webpages.charter.net/autumnrain/streeter1.jpg

    http://webpages.charter.net/autumnrain/streeter2.jpg

    http://webpages.charter.net/autumnrain/streeter3.jpg

    http://webpages.charter.net/autumnrain/streeter4.jpg

    http://webpages.charter.net/autumnrain/streeter5.jpg

    http://webpages.charter.net/autumnrain/streeter6.jpg

    On April 13, 2004, Streeter requested a copy of the divorce, presumably for his upcoming marriage to Bernadett M. Benham, although I do not find any record of a divorce or marriage for either of them (except a divorce for Bernadette from a Darrell Benham)

    MOTION & ORDER SERVED-9/23/99 TO:TABETHA STREETER
    11/19/1999 FINAL ORDER Divorced
    04/13/2004 Certified copy/Copy fee Bartt Streeter

    04/13/2004 $ 4.00 Pd CERTIFIED COPY/COPY FEE BARTT STREETER


    Though I didn't order it, there is a record filed in Clark County, Nevada. It's unknown to me whether it's marriage-related:

    http://recorder.co.clark.nv.us/extReal/SimpleQuery.asp

    Instrument: 20040611-00450 Book/Instr:
    Document Type: Order - MASTER Recorded: 06/11/2004 08:03:53 Pgs: 5
    ReRecorded: N Remarks:
    Requestor: DISTRICT ATTORNEY CLARK COUNTY

    1st Party:
    STREETER, BARTT
    2nd Party:
    BENHAM, BERNADETTE

    The next three criminal items are recorded in Punta Gorda, FL at the Charlotte county, FL website:

    http://www.ccso.org/localcrime/searc...cfm?data=25469

    The final item is from a Charlotte County Official Records Search:

    http://208.47.160.77/or/Search.aspx

    That record is:

    http://http://webpages.charter.net/autumnrain/loser.jpg

    His ex-wife Bernadett Benham also has a Myspace page (you must be logged in) at:

    http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm...endid=78314470

    Records for Tabetha Streeter show her currently as:

    MATTHEWS, TABETHA P (Age 33)

    Associated names:

    MATTHEWS, TABITHA
    MATTHEWS, TABETHA JO
    MATTHEWS, TABITH
    PRICE, TABETHA JO
    STREETER, TABETHA

    and living in:

    EULESS, TX
    LEWISVILLE, TX
    HENSLEY, AR
    NORTH LITTLE ROCK, AR
    LITTLE ROCK, AR
    ARLINGTON, TX

    Now, since she's the first known person that Streeter met after leaving Springfield, if one could track her down and possibly interview her, one never knows what information she may hold.
     
  19. Indianagirl

    Indianagirl New Member

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    Jefferson City News-Tribune (MO)
    June 9, 2002
    Section: News

    City refuses to forget three Springfield women who vanished in 1992
    Article Text:
    Associated Press Writer

    SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- It was graduation night, a night of anticipation and excitement. Friends gathered later for parties, making plans to continue the celebration the next day.

    But somewhere between the parties and the next day, things fell apart for two high school classmates and one of their mothers. They vanished without a trace -- and the mystery is no closer to solution today than it was a decade ago.

    There are no solid clues and no suspects in the disappearance of Sherrill Levitt, her 19-year-old daughter Suzanne "Suzie" Streeter and her daughter's friend, Stacy McCall. Investigators and those who track missing adults recall no similar case.

    "In my 10 years, the case of the three women missing from Springfield is very uncommon," says Kym Pasqualini, president of the Nation's Missing Children Organization and Center for Missing Adults in Phoenix. "It's very unique to have multiple adults disappear together, especially under those circumstances."

    Streeter and McCall graduated from Kickapoo High School on June 6, 1992. After attending two parties, the girls decided to get a few hours' sleep before heading to a Branson amusement park with friends. They arrived in the early morning hours of June 7 at Levitt's home and prepared for bed.

    When friends arrived later that morning, the three women were gone.
    Their purses, containing cigarettes, money and medication, were left behind. Their cars were still in the driveway.

    Except for a broken porch light, nothing seemed askew, although a neighbor reported having seen a nervous woman matching Streeter's description pull a van into her driveway early that morning and turn around. Investigators found no fingerprints, fibers or DNA in the tidy one-story home that sits a few hundred feet from a busy thoroughfare.

    Soon after the apparent abductions, more than 100,000 fliers with the women's pictures were hung on trees, utility poles and in storefront windows. There were prayer vigils and yellow ribbons.

    Searches were conducted by horseback, on foot and by all-terrain vehicles. Divers went into murky lakes. Fields were dug. Woods canvassed.

    "America's Most Wanted" aired the story. So did "48 Hours," Maury Povich and Oprah Winfrey.

    Springfield police have followed more than 5,200 leads that have taken them to more than 20 states, Sgt. Mike Owen says. They have listened to numerous psychics -- one even attempted to elicit clues from Levitt's dog -- and called in a team of retired investigators to review the case. There are no suspects, but about a half-dozen individuals remain under suspicion.

    Local speculation focused on Robert Cox, a former Army Ranger serving 30 years for robbery in Texas who lived in Springfield when the women disappeared. He was convicted in the 1978 murder of a young Walt Disney World worker, but the Florida Supreme Court later acquitted him of all charges. Cox also has not been cleared in a series of 1992 killings along Interstate 70.

    Police admit they're interested in Cox. But they also call him a "manipulator" and an "opportunist" who loves media attention.

    Police speculate sexual assault may have been the motive, with Levitt the intended victim.

    Most agree the best chance for the case to be solved is for an informant to come forward. The reward stands at $100,000.

    A new detective has been assigned to the case, and police hope the fresh attention surrounding the anniversary will bring new leads.
    The family did not plan to mark the somber milestone.
    It was hard enough when they disappeared. As day 3,650 approached, it was clear the grieving had not stopped.

    "I guess I'm surprised people still remember after 10 years," Janis McCall says softly, as she recalls the last time she saw her daughter, Stacy. "For me, it's been 10 years of Hell," she said. A stubborn instinct kindles the faint hope that Stacy is still alive.
    "I'll never give up -- I can't," she says. "I have two choices. I can completely disappear and become a vegetable, or I can go out and try to help."

    Questions from reporters are probing and painful for McCall. She tells endearing stories. And she laughs about the teen-ager her sisters teasingly nicknamed "Spacey Stacy" after she locked her keys in her car -- and how she loved to transform her appearance with hats, makeup or a simple hair braid.

    McCall has blocked out some events surrounding her daughter's disappearance. But she shares what she does remember on the chance it will move someone to report the tip that brings Stacy home.

    McCall admits that at first she was angry -- convinced her 18-year-old daughter was invoking a new independence by not telling her parents of her plans. She recalls arriving at Levitt's house and seeing Stacy's shorts and shirt in Streeter's room. Also there was her purse with the migraine medication needed to control painful headaches.
    "That first night after she disappeared, I remember thinking that she doesn't have her toothbrush. She doesn't have any clothes," McCall says.

    As time passed, regrets mounted: If only she hadn't begged her daughter to wait until morning to make the 35-mile drive south to Branson.

    "I have to remind myself that I did not do this," she says. "I am not to blame. Some horrible person is to blame."

    Hope has faded for Levitt's uncle, Cliff Williams.
    "I guess even if they found them now, it wouldn't mean much because her father is gone," Williams says. "He's the one who deserved to know."

    Levitt's father pondered the case until his death in 1997. The rest of the family went to court a few months later and had Levitt and her daughter declared dead.

    Levitt moved to Springfield in 1980 from Seattle, Wash., intent on starting a new life. She worked as a beautician and loved fixing up homes, he recalls.

    Levitt, then 47, had divorced her daughter's father shortly after she was born. He had never been active in her life.

    Williams pauses as he recalls packing up Streeter's room -- which was filled with clothes, stuffed animals and had numerous posters on the wall.

    "I have no suggestions for police or complaints about what they've done," Williams says. "They just don't have much to go on."

    Janelle Kirby was the link that brought the two girls together.
    "It was just a freak situation that they were even together that night," Kirby says.
    While the faces of her classmates are frozen in time, Kirby is now 28 -- a wife and mother.

    "We were having so much fun," she says. "We had celebrated our birthdays. We had gone to prom and graduation. We were looking forward to summer."
    She and McCall were making plans to attend Southwest Missouri State. They planned to join a sorority.

    Streeter was going to cosmetology school. She wanted to be a beautician, like her mom.
    Kirby still searches strangers' faces, hoping to find her friends.
    The case continues to trouble David Asher, who retired from the Springfield Police Department in 1995.

    Everyone was puzzled by the pristine crime scene, says Asher, who headed the investigation in the early days. "Mom's glasses were next to the bed. There was a book turned over, as if she had been reading. It just did not look like a crime scene."
    He has his own theory: Someone plucked Levitt's small dog from her backyard, then knocked on the door, using the ruse of wanting to return it.
    "I wish more than anything that this case would be solved," he says. "I personally think they have the information, but it just hasn't been all put together yet. They need the piece that makes it all make sense."

    Restaurant manager Matt Marquart insists he is not on a crusade, but he refuses to remove the poster of the three missing women from the window of Coyote's Adobe Cafe and Bar.

    "After 10 years, I just can't take it down," he says. "I won't until this thing is over."
    Marquart remembers when the women's faces were everywhere he looked.
    What Marquart remembers most is how it changed Springfield. Suddenly people started locking their doors, scrutinizing strangers, trying to jar their memory of the tiniest detail that might help police, he says.

    "That poster is tattered and torn -- it has a lot of tape on it," Marquart says. "But it stands for something. It's a reminder that those women are still missing. Who knows, maybe someone will see it and think of something that will help."
     
  20. Indianagirl

    Indianagirl New Member

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    St. Louis Post-Dispatch
    June 9, 1993
    Edition: FIVE STAR
    Section: NEWS
    Page: 6A

    FEW LEADS ON FATE OF 3 MISSING WOMEN
    Author: AP
    Dateline: SPRINGFIELD, MO.
    Article Text:

    A year of anguish, fears and anger has passed for the families and friends of three women who disappeared after a graduation party. Even the investigators have shed tears.

    The waiting continues.

    A year ago Monday, the three women - Sherill Levitt; her daughter, Suzie Streeter; and Suzie's high school classmate Stacy McCall - vanished from Levitt's home.
    After 5,000 leads, investigators have no suspects and few clues. They acknowledge that they are no closer to solving the case than they were the night of June 7, 1992.

    "I couldn't even begin to tell you how awful it's been," said Janis McCall, Stacy's mother.

    The women disappeared hours after McCall, then 18, and Streeter, then 19, graduated from Kickapoo High School. Police suspect that the three were kidnapped and murdered. But like the families, investigators say it's possible the women could turn up alive.

    Detective Gerald Dove has shed tears of frustration.

    "Knowing I have a job to do, knowing that there are people depending on me has kept me and others going," Dove said.

    Deb Schwartz of Seattle wants to establish a memorial of some type - a gravestone or red roses - for her half-sister, Levitt, and her niece. But there's no gravesite to visit.

    "Where do you go?" she asked. "I think it's one of the most cruel things someone could do, to take lives like this and watch people - the survivors - dangle on a wire."

    Levitt, a divorced hair stylist, was last seen alive at 4 p.m. June 6, 1992. McCall left a graduation party with Streeter around 2 a.m. June 7 and decided to spend the night with her friend.

    Sometime early June 7, the three apparently were abducted from the home "quickly and without a struggle," police Sgt. David Asher said.

    McCall hadn't planned to spend the night at the home, leading authorities to believe she wasn't the target of an abduction.

    Police later found each woman's car parked outside Levitt's home. Inside the unlocked and orderly home was everything the women likely would have taken had they left willingly: purses, cash, makeup, keys, identification, cigarettes, medication.

    Police in this city of about 140,000 initially put 30 investigators on the case. Now, one full-time and two part-time investigators remain. The case has been profiled on television crime shows, but tips have dwindled.

    On Monday, about 200 people gathered in a park to pay tribute to the women and to release yellow balloons. They were inscribed with messages that included "Come home soon."

    Police will investigate "until we resolve the case," police Capt. Todd Whitson said.
     
  21. pittsburghgirl

    pittsburghgirl New Member

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