Teenager loses dad his 80 grand settlement by posting on Facebook

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Tricia, Mar 2, 2014.

  1. Tricia

    Tricia Owner Websleuths.com Staff Member Administrator

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    Oh dear me this kid did something really obnoxious and very costly to her father.

    She posted about a settlement he received in a lawsuit and the settlement was revoked.

    http://guardianlv.com/2014/03/daughter-facebook-post-costs-dad-80000-in-settlement-payment/

    What's sad is teenagers do stupid things all the time without thinking and this time it is really going to cost her family.

    It will be interesting to see how this ends up. Dad still may receive his money.
     
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  3. zippitydoda

    zippitydoda Well-Known Member

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  4. JeannaT

    JeannaT Former Member

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    Well, confidential settlement means confidential settlement - as in shut your trap and don't tell your daughter about it.

    I wonder how many other people he told.
     
  5. ebonydarkness

    ebonydarkness New Member

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    She doesn't deserve that kind of money.
     
  6. EmmaliLucia

    EmmaliLucia New Member

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    Forgive me, but, aren't settlements supposed to pay for things like medical bills or lost wages? I wasn't aware that settlements were meant to pay for things like European vacations. Those poor saps, paying off their medical bills or just trying to survive! They should know that that money is for vacation time for their children to brag about on Facebook!
     
  7. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    I don't believe settlments usually have conditions on how one can spend the money. The father claimed he was fired from his job because of his age. He asked for money for lost wages and for agiesm, not for medical bills.
     
  8. Snoods

    Snoods Active Member

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    The settlement was from an age discrimination lawsuit, which wouldn't involve any medical bills. To my non-lawyer mind $10,000 in lost wages could have been used to spend on a vacation for his daughter, and the $80,000 reimbursement could be for future wages lost. But in any case, you can't mandate how someone spends their settlement. I received a small settlement once (ha really tiny) and there were no restrictions involved with it.

    The following is a breakdown of the agreement taken from the article linked above:

    The settlement was initially agreed upon in 2011, after Gulliver decided to pay Snay $10,000 for back salaries, $60,000 to his attorneys and also an $80,000 reimbursement with the condition that he had to keep the terms and existence of the contract private.

    http://guardianlv.com/2014/03/daughter-facebook-post-costs-dad-80000-in-settlement-payment/

    Interesting case!
     
  9. Tugela

    Tugela New Member

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    I don't see how they can impose a privacy condition on the daughter, and as part of his household she would have been privy to the state of the lawsuit.

    If the settlement is revoked, then surely it would go back to trial?
     
  10. Linda7NJ

    Linda7NJ New Member

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    If the daughter didn't sign the agreement she isn't party to it.
    Unless they are suggesting a father can't legally share the settlement info with family ( seems unlikely and ridiculous)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  11. jjenny

    jjenny Well-Known Member

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    Per the article, he wasn't supposed to share with his daughter (it was a part of the agreement).
     
  12. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    The daughter's post was stupid but I hope a court agrees the dad should still get his money in the end. It is ridiculous that a family member gets a settlement but cannot mention it other family members. Can you imagine living in a house and a parent gets a settlement but cannot explain that the case is over and where the money they have now came from.

    It is not the father's fault his daughter did this.
     
  13. zippitydoda

    zippitydoda Well-Known Member

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    I think its good business sense to put confidentiality agreements in place.

    Dad made a mistake of trusting his daughter (IMO - with information she did not need or have a right to know) - and the daughter appears to be a typical teenager who was told juicy information and had a Facebook account. Teenager + Secret + Facebook = no longer a secret.
     
  14. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    I personally don't like confidentiality agreements if you get damages you should keep them no matter what. They are almost never a good thing for the person who is receiving the damages. If I am offered a confidentiality agreement for what happened to me I will refuse it and keep fighting till the end. I don't want a sole to know anything about my claim but I don't like being told I what I can and cannot do like a child.
     
  15. zwiebel

    zwiebel New Member

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    Well, any settlement agreement that involves a father not being able to confide in his family looks suspect to me. It's damaging to family.

    And any settlement agreement revoked because a teenage girl made a throwaway (but pretty harmless) post on a FB page, makes those who revoked it look bad. I think.

    I'd like to know why they were settling an age case in secret anyway. It's a mistake to make presumptions based on age but anyone can make them. Saying sorry publically is more important than money, in my opinion.

    Presumptions about age lead to things like perfectly sharp, healthy seniors like Bob Harrod just disappearing and nobody thinking twice. That's a very bad thing.

    So is being rude, so I think teen should say sorry for the 'sucks' comment too, but then they could all work things out together. Maybe set up some kind of project for kids in need of help between them? With input from the old, the young and officials, it could be unbeatable!
     
  16. al66pine

    al66pine New Member

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    If I’m interpreting correctly, it seems some folks here think -
    after voluntarily signing to withdraw lawsuit in exchange for payment to compensate him
    (for alleged monetary injuries resulting from school’s alleged age-discrimination against him)
    and agreeing that neither he nor his wife would communicate re agreement and terms,
    then approx. a few days later, violating that agreement,
    he should not be subject to consequences of his violation of agreement?

    IOW, use the courts to sue a person, with attorneys representing your interests,
    prior to trial, reach a settlement w other party(ies), sign an agreement w other party(ies),
    promise non-disclosure,
    violate agreement by disclosing to someone,
    then insist on getting the money anyway?

    What if instead of a confidentiality clause violation, it had been a payment violation.
    What if the same agreement had been reached and all parties signed the document,
    then the school paid only one quarter of agreed on $$$ to employee, per written document?
    Should the employee just say, oh well, I'm okay w less than promised.
    Should a court not be able to force the school to comply w terms agreed to, and to pay the other three quarters, the balance?

    Can you imagine living in a judicial system that allows a person to do this?

    Disclosure or non-disclosure clauses in legal settlement agreements are negotiated, in virtually every case (AFAIK).

    So if school thought it was just fine for Mr. & Mrs. Snay to disclose agreement and terms,
    that confidentiality clause would not have been in the document
    they all signed to confirm agreement.
    Or if Mr Snay had insisted on non-confidentiality, a non-confidentiality clause would have been in that document,
    w all parties signing.

    JM2cts and I may be wrong. :seeya:
     
  17. al66pine

    al66pine New Member

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    BBM SBM

    Disclosure or non-disclosure clauses in legal settlement agreements are negotiated, in virtually every case (AFAIK).
    The reference to 'being told, like a child' does not seem applicable here, imo.

    Mr Snay, who was represented by legal counsel, voluntarily signed to agree not to disclose.
    If Mr Snay had insisted on non-confidentiality, a non-confidentiality clause would have been in that document,
    w all parties signing.

    JM2cts and I could be wrong. :seeya:
     
  18. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    I can understand your point if the man or his wife broke the agreement but they didn't the daughter did. If you have twenty people in your family and one of them mentions damages have been paid to you (which is not your fault and entirely out with your control) why should you be held legally and financially liable for that persons actions.
     
  19. al66pine

    al66pine New Member

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    BBM

    Yes, an person alleging age-discrimination in an employment case may feel receiving
    the school-employer's public apology to him is more important than his receiving $$$.
    But apparently this employee did not feel that way, imo.

    If he wanted the school's public apology, he should not have signed a document agreeing to confidentiality, imo.

    JM2cts and I may be wrong. :seeya:
     
  20. gregjrichards

    gregjrichards Well-Known Member

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    Are there any lawyers on web sleuths who can weigh in on this? How can a father who has signed a confidentiality agreement be held liable for his daughter's actions (a daughter who has not signed the document or bound by the terms of it)?

    I am sure the man and his wife had no intention of speaking out ever about the settlement and could not have foreseen their daughter speaking about it on Facebook. Perhaps the daughter did not know a confidentiality agreement was in place. I hope the court still gives the father his damages and cannot hold him liable for his daughter's foolishness.
     
  21. al66pine

    al66pine New Member

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    Snipped from and BBM & SBM, http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/02/us/facebook-post-costs-father/
    Quoting Mr. Snay:
    "What happened is that after settlement, my wife and I went in the parking lot, and we had to make some decisions on what we were going to tell my daughter. …”
    "… We understood the confidentiality. So we knew what the restrictions were, yet we needed to tell her something," Snay explained in court documents.
    And then
    “A hearing was held to determine if his daughter's knowledge of the settlement and her Facebook post had violated the confidentiality agreement

    IOW, by telling dau about settlement, Mr. Snay knowingly violated confidentiality agreement he had just signed.
    Seems like he expected no repercussions, imo.

    JM2cts and I may be wrong.
     

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