The Verdict Waiting Room #2

Discussion in 'Allison Baden-Clay of Australia' started by marlywings, Jun 3, 2014.

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  1. Mumma Bear

    Mumma Bear New Member

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    So even if the prosecution believed she was never in her PJs, why didn't they call his bluff? It would have worked in their favour either way. Lean on him that the PJs were never found and point out what that implies - they had incriminating evidence. Either that gets emphasised along with more guilt, or he changes his story and says she might have been wearing the daggy Katie's pants after all. Neither scenario looks good for GBC, so I don't know why they didn't use it!
     


  2. HoolyDooly

    HoolyDooly New Member

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    Yes Susan12, thinking exactly the same !

    Trying to believe they are being prudent...hoping it is NOT going to be overanalysed by a juror into a mistrial etc THAT would be a miscarriage of justice I feel !

    I wonder how Todd Fuller and prosecution team and the Police involved are all feeling, as well.
     
  3. tarjessi

    tarjessi Former Member

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    I am probably completely wrong but something feels a bit hinky within the jury...I hope there isn't someone being paid off to hang the jury or persuade them to vote not guilty. As I said I am probably wrong but this all feels off...use your logical brains jurors. I work with someone who is incredibly frustrating and argues every point about every word you say (with every staff member) to the point where you want to scream in frustration...I sincerely hope there is not someone with that type of unreasonable personality amongst the ranks.
     
  4. tarjessi

    tarjessi Former Member

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    Can I ask anyone familiar with trials if this level of additional clarification normal? Perhaps it is and I am perceiving things incorrectly based on the fact that I honestly believe GBC is guilty based on the evidence presented.
     
  5. Tangled_Web

    Tangled_Web Active Member

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    Would so love to know their thoughts at this time. Three detectives arrived at court this afternoon, seeing them in court awaiting a verdict reminded me of the tremendous effort on their part to get this far.
     
  6. HoolyDooly

    HoolyDooly New Member

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    *Sounds to me Allison was carved from the same stone of consideration and kindness
     
  7. JK673

    JK673 New Member

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    There is an argument for having professional jurors i think
     
  8. HoolyDooly

    HoolyDooly New Member

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    I have been a chatterbox tonight :facepalm: must go to bed:countsheep:
     
  9. JK673

    JK673 New Member

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    Pretty sure they know what they are doing.....
     
  10. BJsleuth

    BJsleuth New Member

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    Re: the pyjama pants. There are two seperate conclusions can be drawn:

    1. The pyjamas never existed which leads to the question WHY did GBC make it up; or
    2. The pyjamas did exist, Alison was wearing them the night before she disappeared and that leaves the questions - Where are the pyjamas and if they're missing, why are they missing? They shouldn't be if it happened as he said it did.
     
  11. alioop

    alioop Verified Attorney (AU)

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    One of the crazy rules is that the judge cannot explain what reasonable doubt is, they have to work it out for themselves.
     
  12. BJsleuth

    BJsleuth New Member

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    Because it's what is reasonable to them individually?
     
  13. Seeking

    Seeking New Member

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    I believe that there may be greater risks of corruption and complacency with professional jurors. Currently jurors represent the common people. I believe that most people called to that duty will take it seriously and as it is outside their "normal" experience they may be less ho hum about it than if they were doing it day in day out. All just my opinion.
     
  14. alioop

    alioop Verified Attorney (AU)

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    Yes whatever they think it is.
     
  15. tarjessi

    tarjessi Former Member

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    Alioop can I ask is this amount of clarification requested by the jury fairly normal?
     
  16. alioop

    alioop Verified Attorney (AU)

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    I agree, I have problems with the concept of professional jurors. The south African system is interesting which I am learning about in the Oscar Pistorius trial. They don't have juries at all. In the OP trial there is a judge with 2 assessors who are highly trained lawyers. They help the judge and can jointly overrule her verdict. I think they are on the ball more than the judge.
     
  17. JK673

    JK673 New Member

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    Professional jurors can be common people too. Just employ them for longer than they are now..
     
  18. BJsleuth

    BJsleuth New Member

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    I agree with you on that.
     
  19. alioop

    alioop Verified Attorney (AU)

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    I think so. I think it would be unusual for the jury in a murder trial not to be asking questions.
     
  20. tarjessi

    tarjessi Former Member

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    I think a majority of the time juries made up of our peers do serve the community well and assess evidence to the best of their ability. I think having professional jurors could increase the possibility for corruption...
     
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