Their birds possibly distressed by wind farm turbines, two emu ranchers call it a day

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by wfgodot, Nov 18, 2013.

  1. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Emu farmers blame birds' deaths on wind farms. (cbc.ca)
    -
    more at the link, with pictures of distressed emu owners and possibly distressed emu
     
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  3. Steely Dan

    Steely Dan Former Member

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    They were harvesting the emus but they're glad they're going somewhere safe. BAH! :snooty:

    I wonder if it could be the noise?
     
  4. wfgodot

    wfgodot Former Member

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    Yes, noted; almost called them "emu harvesters" in thread title (but "ranchers" sounded funnier). Also wondering about noise - perhaps I guess it might distress a large bird.
     
  5. montana_16

    montana_16 Active Member

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    I'm really upset! Emus are eaten? I swear I thought they were used for their feathers or something else benign. :(:sigh::anguish:
     
  6. Reality Orlando

    Reality Orlando Verified Aquaculturalist

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    Wind turbines kill hundreds of thousands of birds a year:

    "After the sad death of the White-throated Needletail on Harris, Outer Hebrides, on 26 June when it hit the shaft of a wind turbine on the island, some birders were vocal in their disapproval of the prominent energy generators, proclaiming them to be killers of bird in large numbers. While some of these claims were somewhat exaggerated, it turns out that they may inded be more dangerous than thought previously.
    A new study just published in the United States has estimated that around 573,000 birds were killed by wind turbines in 2012 (including 83,000 birds of prey), in increase of 30 per cent on a previous estimate by the US fish and Wildlife Service in 2009. Bats are even worse hit, says author K Shawn Smallwood, and probably top 888,000 killed per year."

    https://www.wind-watch.org/news/2013/07/21/wind-farm-bird-deaths-more-than-thought/

    "For years, a huge wind farm in California's San Joaquin Valley was slaughtering thousands of birds, including golden eagles, red-tailed hawks and burrowing owls.
    The raptors would get sliced up by the blades on the 5,400 turbines in Altamont Pass, or electrocuted by the wind farm's power lines. Scientists, wildlife agencies and turbine experts came together in an attempt to solve the problem. The result?

    Protective measures put in place in an effort to reduce deaths by 50% failed. Deaths in fact soared for three of four bird species studied, said the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area Bird Fatality Study.

    The slaughter at Altamont Pass is being raised by avian scientists who say the drive among environmentalists to rapidly boost U.S. wind-farm power 20 times could lead to massive bird losses and even extinctions."

    http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/environment/2009-09-21-wind-farms_N.htm
     
  7. Laughing

    Laughing Well-Known Member

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    Steely, down in the Basement you claim to be giving away an Emu farm in Australia.

    Looks like the going-out-of-business-Emu-ranch is in Nova Scotia!!!

    Cool, we can drive there with a couple ferry passages! :loveyou:

    Laughing

    (BTW, genuinely sorry the turbines seem to bother the emu. Yep, a change to any system changes that system, duh. Wind turbines are generally a good option, North Americans using less electricity is a better one!)
     
  8. montana_16

    montana_16 Active Member

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    This is horrible. So much we just don't know about. Me anyway. I am all for alternative energy but not at the cost of these birds! Birds are my favorite beings on earth and they are so important to the survival of us all.

    I've always wondered why there isn't lots more solar power. The sun is just sitting up there for free. I know there are costs involved but isn't it better than the other alternatives? I probably don't know some bad stuff about this too. Shoot.
     
  9. Ausgirl

    Ausgirl Enough Is Enough!

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    The bird deaths mentioned above are, I believe, due to birds flying INTO the turbine blades.. not something I would expect an emu to do...

    I think the deaths are probably a lot more to do with this:

    The average annual temperatures in Nova Scotia are:

    Spring from 1 °C (34 °F) to 17 °C (63 °F)
    Summer from 14 °C (57 °F) to 28 °C (82 °F)[18]
    Autumn about 5 °C (41 °F) to 20 °C (68 °F)
    Winter about −9 °C (16 °F) to 0 °C (32 °F)


    Compared to average temps in the country areas of my state here in Aus (Victoria, so we're way down south and a heap cooler than emu territory up north...):

    January 32.8 °C (91.0 °F)
    February 32.7 °C (90.9 °F)
    March 29.3 °C (84.7 °F)
    April 24.1 °C (75.4 °F)
    May 19.6 °C (67.3 °F)
    June 16.0 °C (60.8 °F)
    July 15.4 °C (59.7 °F)
    August 17.7 °C (63.9 °F)
    September 21.1 °C (70.0 °F)
    October 25.0 °C (77.0 °F)
    November 29.0 °C (84.2 °F)
    December 31.7 °C (89.1 °F)


    I reckon them emus just needed a woolly jumper. Oi.

    I think trying to raise birds which evolved in a very hot, dry country in a much colder climate is probably not a good idea. Like trying to keep tropical fish (like bettas!!!) in cold water. They just won't do well, particularly with very cold weather.
     
  10. Steely Dan

    Steely Dan Former Member

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    I know! Some people here (Softail and STEADFAST being the worst offenders) joke about making emu burgers. :stormingmad:

    It gets pretty dang cold in Australia in the winter.
     
  11. Ausgirl

    Ausgirl Enough Is Enough!

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    Yes, it can get pretty cold, Dan - but unless you're in the highlands it rarely gets down to freezing temps.

    I was just thinking, if the birds were a bit too chilly all year round, and exposed to foggy damp and bouts of high winds too, they might get a bit run down and prone to illnesses.

    Poor emus.
     

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