Tropical Storm Ophelia possible for Florida

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Dark Knight, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight New Member

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    Another area of low pressure is just off the southeast coast of Florida and has shown little movement today. This feature should drift to the north or northwest, which will bring heavy rain and gusty winds to Florida over the next several days. This developing low will combine with a strong ridge of high pressure across the northeastern United States, and the result will be an increase of northeast winds, high surf and rip currents along the east coast of Florida and the Southeast coast over the next few days. This feature also bears watching for potential tropical development.

    http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/regions.asp?site=atl&partner=

    Also, Hurricane Maria and the new Tropical Storm Nate are not expected to threaten the U.S.
     
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  3. Amraann

    Amraann Former Member

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    Ahhh that is all the rain cutting into my beach time...
     
  4. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight New Member

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    New Storm Could Bring Heavy Rain to Fla.

    By JILL BARTON, Associated Press Writer


    About 120 miles of Florida's Atlantic coast were under a tropical storm warning Tuesday as a new system formed offshore and threatened to dump up to 15 inches of rain in parts of the state.

    The tropical depression could strengthen into Tropical Storm Ophelia by Wednesday, which prompted the warning from north of Jupiter to Titusville, according to the National Hurricane Center. It is expected to bring tropical storm conditions of wind of at least 39 mph to the state by Wednesday morning.

    "The primary concern is very heavy rains," hurricane specialist Richard Pasch said. Five to 10 inches were expected over the next few days, with some isolated areas possibly getting 15 inches. The rain was expected to hit areas affected by last year's Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne. Much of the region has recovered but some homes remain covered in blue tarps as owners await new roofs.

    Emergency management officials in St. Lucie and Indian River counties said they were monitoring the depression for developments but were not taking any protective action.

    "Right now we're looking at this as a rain event," said Nathan McCollum, emergency management coordinator for Indian River County.

    At 2 p.m. EDT, the depression had top sustained winds of about 30 mph and was centered about 180 miles southeast of Cape Canaveral. It wasn't moving, but it should start heading north-northwest later Tuesday.

    Two other storms were out in the open ocean Tuesday as the busy hurricane season continues. Tropical Storm Nate intensified south of Bermuda, while Hurricane Maria weakened on its way to the colder waters of the north Atlantic.

    Nate, the 14th named storm of the season, was centered about 275 miles south-southwest of Bermuda with top sustained winds near 60 mph. Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center said it could reach hurricane strength, with winds of at least 74 mph, by Wednesday.

    It wasn't moving, though it was expected to eventually make a turn to the northeast, forecasters said.

    "Perhaps by the end of the work week it could be posing a threat to Bermuda, but not the U.S.," hurricane specialist Stacy Stewart said.

    Maria peaked late Monday as a Category 3 hurricane with top wind speed at 115 mph. By 11 a.m. EDT, it was centered about 545 miles east-northeast of Bermuda with winds near 100 mph, forecasters said.

    The hurricane was only a threat to shipping interests as it moved north-northeast near 7 mph, forecasters said.

    Maria is the fifth hurricane of the Atlantic hurricane season. The season began June 1 and ends Nov. 30. Peak storm activity typically occurs from the end of August through mid-September.

    Florida has been hit by six hurricanes since August 2004, including Katrina, blamed for 11 deaths in the state.

    ___

    On the Net:

    National Hurricane Center: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov
     
  5. Beyond Belief

    Beyond Belief New Member

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    Geez, our area The Treasure coast is smack in the middle of Jupiter Inlet (Palm Beach) to Titusville (Cape Kennedy). I wonder what time the power will go off. I wonder what week the power will come back on.
     
  6. Tom'sGirl

    Tom'sGirl Former Member

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    BB, How is it in Vero now?

    My friend called me last week and I know she's fit to be tied because she can't email me about the weather as she can't get her WebTV thingie hooked up in her new condo.

    She's computer challenged, relied too long on Web, so hope she learns :D I'm hoping her daughter in Miami comes and sets her up!
     
  7. Shadow205

    Shadow205 New Member

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    Looks like its just going to be a lot of rain BB. Heck you get stronger winds than that in an afternoon thunderstorm.
     
  8. Beyond Belief

    Beyond Belief New Member

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    Its beautiful here right now. We had a little rain this afternoon, but lighter LOL than the normal 3 o'clock downpour.I put everything in our survival kit except a boat. And hip boots, I hope I have time to run to Sam's.

    Vero Beach is fine tonight.
     
  9. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight New Member

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    http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/regions.asp?a=b&site=ATL

    As of 2 PM EDT, Tropical Storm Ophelia was stationary and just
    wobbling around mph, east of the central east coast Florida coastline. The center of the storm was near 28.8 north and 79.4 west, or about 80 miles east-northeast of Cape Canaveral, FL. A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the east coast of Florida from Sebastian Inlet northward to Flagler Beach. A tropical storm watch is in effect for the northeast Florida coast north of Flagler Beach to Fernandina Beach.

    Maximum sustained winds in Ophelia are near 50 mph, and the storm continues to look better on both the satellite and radar. Steering winds are expected to remain very light and, as a result, the system should wobble around and stay off the east coast of Florida for the next day or two. Given persistent surface pressure falls, very warm water temperatures and only light wind shear, Ophelia should continue to strengthen. There is a good chance that Ophelia will become a hurricane within the next 12-24 hours. The main impact from this system will be heavy rain, mainly along the central and northern east coast of Florida as well as well as the central and northern sections of the peninsula. This heavy rain potential is expected to last over the next few days. There will also be rough surf and rip currents along the east coast of Florida and the Southeast coast of the U.S. over the next few days. The forecast movement of Ophelia is a very complex and difficult one. One option is for Ophelia to move westward across central Florida and wind up in the eastern Gulf of Mexico this weekend. Another option is for Ophelia to drift north or northwest along the Florida coast, before turning northeast away from the Southeast coast. Even if this latter option were to occur, there is still a good chance that it could loop back toward the coast next week. The bottom line is that the future movement of Ophelia is very uncertain and all interests along the southeast U.S. coast - and even the Gulf coast - should monitor the progress of Ophelia
     
  10. concernedperson

    concernedperson Former Member

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    Just turned into Hurricane Ophelia. Sitting 60 miles off the coast of Florida and not moving. Yuck!!
     
  11. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight New Member

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    Uh oh. Everyone nearby be careful, please! Don't take any storm lightly.
     
  12. Buzz Mills

    Buzz Mills New Member

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    HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 15 MILES... 30 KM...
    FROM THE CENTER...AND TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP
    TO 80 MILES...130 KM.

    THE AIR FORCE HURRICANE HUNTER AIRCRAFT REPORTED A MINIMUM CENTRAL
    PRESSURE OF 985 MB...29.09 INCHES.

    OPHELIA IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE TOTAL RAINFALL ACCUMULATIONS OF 1 TO
    3 INCHES ACROSS PORTIONS OF CENTRAL AND NORTHERN FLORIDA.

    REPEATING THE 5 PM EDT POSITION...28.6 N... 79.5 W. MOVEMENT
    ...STATIONARY. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS... 75 MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL
    PRESSURE... 985 MB.

    AN INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE
    CENTER AT 8 PM EDT FOLLOWED BY THE NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY AT 11 PM
    EDT.


    Real-time Satellite Imagery Loop
    http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/DATA/RT/float-ir4-loop.html
     
  13. Beyond Belief

    Beyond Belief New Member

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  14. tybee204

    tybee204 Administrator

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    I hate when they show me in that damn bubble!
     
  15. Buzz Mills

    Buzz Mills New Member

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    AT 5 PM EDT...2100Z...THE CENTER OF HURRICANE OPHELIA WAS LOCATED
    NEAR LATITUDE 30.0 NORTH...LONGITUDE 78.2 WEST OR ABOUT 175 MILES
    EAST-NORTHEAST OF DAYTONA BEACH FLORIDA AND ABOUT 220 MILES
    SOUTH-SOUTHEAST OF CHARLESTON SOUTH CAROLINA.

    OPHELIA IS MOVING TOWARD THE NORTHEAST NEAR 7 MPH. THIS MOTION IS
    EXPECTED TO CONTINUE TONIGHT AND SATURDAY.

    MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS HAVE INCREASED TO NEAR 75 MPH WITH HIGHER
    GUSTS. OPHELIA IS A CATEGORY ONE HURRICANE ON THE SAFFIR-SIMPSON
    SCALE. NO SIGNIFICANT CHANGE IN STRENGTH IS FORECAST DURING THE
    NEXT 24 HOURS.

    HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 15 MILES FROM THE
    CENTER...AND TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP
    TO 70 MILES.

    LATEST MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE REPORTED BY A NOAA RECONNAISSANCE
    PLANE WAS 983 MB...29.03 INCHES.

    REPEATING THE 5 PM EDT POSITION...30.0 N... 78.2 W. MOVEMENT
    TOWARD...NORTHEAST NEAR 7 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED
    WINDS... 75 MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE... 983 MB.

    THE NEXT ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER AT
    11 PM EDT.

    http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/DATA/RT/float-ir4-loop.html
     
  16. Casshew

    Casshew Former Member

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    Ophelia regains hurricane strength and could make landfall in South Carolina on Monday or Tuesday, says National Hurricane Center.

    Uh oh, Tybee :(
     
  17. tybee204

    tybee204 Administrator

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    Which side of the eye is worst to be on? Anyone remember?
     
  18. Casshew

    Casshew Former Member

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    I think the right
     
  19. concernedperson

    concernedperson Former Member

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    The northeast side.
     
  20. tybee204

    tybee204 Administrator

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    OK so if it comes in to the North of me I can evac to the south of me. LOl Im trying to determine where to book reservations tomorrow if i need to. Hotels are still full from Evacuees from NO and Mississippi so it might be difficult
     
  21. Casshew

    Casshew Former Member

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    What is the worst side to be on when there is a hurricane? I have heard there is one side that is worse than the other.

    A: The right side of a hurricane usually has the fastest winds, while the left side often has the heaviest rain. (Most people describe hurricane severity by wind speed not rain amounts, even though the number one cause of death in a hurricane is fresh water flooding.)

    A hurricane is a whirling mass of thunderstorms that spins counterclockwise. As a hurricane moves, the wind on its right side blows in the direction of the storm's motion. That means a hurricane packing 100 mph winds and moving at 20 mph has a combined wind of 120 mph on that side of the storm. It also means that the forward motion of 20 mph takes away from the opposing wind on the left side of the storm: 100 mph - 20 mph = 80 mph. In this example, that's a 40 mph difference in wind from one side of the storm to the other. The forward motion has no effect on the wind in the front or rear part of the hurricane.

    While storm surge generally occurs in the center of a hurricane, higher waves and the onshore wind in the right side of the storm can worsen the surge there. Also, tornadoes are most likely in the right-front part of a hurricane, which makes the right side that much worse.
     

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