TX - Thanks Katrina! 3000 felons in Texas (yeehaw)

Discussion in 'Up to the Minute' started by Jeana (DP), Apr 14, 2006.

  1. Jeana (DP)

    Jeana (DP) Former Member

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    As many as 3,000 Hurricane Katrina evacuees in Texas are on probation or parole in their home state but most are probably living under no form of supervision, and state officials are providing their names to local authorities because they could be suspects in new crimes. The Texas Department of Public Safety urged local authorities to consult the list of names to "develop possible suspects for certain crime problems that have advanced since Hurricane Katrina."

    more at:

    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/041406dntexcriminals.1c6ce522.html
     
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  3. Greywing

    Greywing New Member

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    Hopefully they'll get Texas justice!
     
  4. CyberLaw

    CyberLaw Former Member

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    Sure, if anyone can find the original file, evidence, court records and probation/Parole officers. Good luck......without evidence or files.......

    We found John Doe, he was surposed to report to Parole Officers in LA and now he is in Texas.

    How long is John Doe on Parole for and what was his original offence and details. Don't know......there is no file.........the courthouse is under water, the file has floated away, we have no idea who was the Parole Officer was.

    Say thank you GWB for another fine mess............and putting the citizens of Texas, you home state at risk.........
     
  5. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    You can't blame Bush for NOPD keeping their files & evidence room in the SUB BASEMENT of the justice building downtown, near the coroner's office. (An ex-boyfriend used to work for a judge.)
     
  6. CyberLaw

    CyberLaw Former Member

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    Well guess what the City of NO would not have been under several feet of water in a sub basments or whatever, if only GWB and Brownie were actually prepared and listened to what people in NO were telling them.

    Plus I can also blame GWB for not financing the repair or inprovements of the Levees, despite being told that if this type of Hurricane and intensity would hit NO, the city most likely would be flooded. Oh I forgot, GWB said that the Goverment was prepared, for what exactly is a whole different story.

    So lets look at the causation of the flooded sub basement shall we.........what caused the sub basement to flood.

    Gee, let me put on my thinking cap........:waitasec:

    When an event happens, the first thing you look at is causation or proximate cause.

    Often files are stored in basements because of the space involved. Why use up "expensive" and "valuable" space that is used for the purpose of LE or the Courts and all of the employees to store files.

    Because I don't think any employee would want or could work in the basement. Especially if they need and require access to other information and other employees.

    Basement are routinely used to store items that do not require access on a daily basis or to store items.
     
  7. BhamMama

    BhamMama Former Member

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    SUB BASEMENT of the justice building downtown

    Not sure there was a sub anything there. As New Orleans is 12 feet below sea level, they don't do much digging there.

    You would think they would have had these on a state mainline computer somewhere.

    But as with most things important, this won't be addressed until someone is hurt or killed.
     
  8. Details

    Details Former Member

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    One huge thing Katrina taught us - computerizing records is a very good thing, and is really a necessity. Noncomputerized records can be destroyed, are hard to search, can't be shared between different branches of law enforcement, or if medical records - can't be sent to your new doctor easily, etc. They'd be able to find more of these people with better records, and more importantly, be able to know what the charges and evidence are for the people they had awaiting trial who now may get off.
     
  9. T'sNana

    T'sNana Nana Extraordinaire

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    This is so unfair for the noncriminals and law enforcement to have to deal with these individuals. New Orleans should document backup, backup, backup all files and I hope they learn a big lesson....but I fear Texas and other states who have taken in these criminals are going to be the ones that have learned a lesson. Texas really stepped up to the plate and it's terrible they have to deal with this. :slap:
     
  10. CyberLaw

    CyberLaw Former Member

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    Not all branches are able to access the same files though the system or mainframe. They would have to all have access to the same network for all of the files.

    So lets just say a Police file is on a computer. Well anyone in the Police Department has access to it, but not the clerk, not the Judge, not the Parole Officer as they are on a different systems and network.

    Also if notes are made, they would have to be updated, so that others know.

    That is why you need and require hard copies of all files.

    So when a case comes before a Judge, a file is placed before him. Also notes are made in the file by the Clerk.........and then filed away......

    Every person in the entire justice system, LE, DA, etc in any capacity would have to have access to the same computer file.

    People have a great deal of "territorial" capacity when it comes to their work.

    Plus if work is done on laptops, they have to be updated. Info may not be updated, it can be and would be a huge mess costing millions of dollars to implement.

    Trust me when I say, hard copies are easier.....especially for the older members of the bar and judges who get pretty frustrated at technology sometimes.

    When it comes to legal and medical, it is the professional association that will kick you but from Canada to Texas if you don't keep extremely accurate files both in technology and hard copies.

    If you don't you can be brought before the professional association and answer to "Professional Misconduct" accusations.

    People can input information incorrectly into computer files..............

    Oh yeah, not to mention disclosure to the attorney, which has to be done through police records, which will be in the form of hard copies.

    Or Motions and also evidence...........
     
  11. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    I hate to tell you, but the levees were gonna break no matter what. I lived there. This was a long time coming. You can make an arguement about the delay in getting people out of harm's way, but nobody living or dead can change where water's going to go below sea-level.
     
  12. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    The "sub-basement" of the justice building is accessible through the parking garage, which is roughly about 4-5 feet below street level. The actual "1st floor' of the justice building, where the court rooms are, would be a 3rd floor in most other buildings. Below the court rooms and judges chambers are a couple floors that are basically holding pens for criminal defendants from the nearby jail, a cafeteria, the jury pool area, various offices, the police evidence lockers, the coroner's office and the city morgue, the loading dock for which opens onto the parking garage I mentioned.
     
  13. blueclouds

    blueclouds Former member

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    I understand the horrifying circumstances of "unknown" criminals but if not TEXAS... then where should they be????
    :rolleyes:
     
  14. BhamMama

    BhamMama Former Member

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    Gotcha, was just trying to wrap my head around that word basement and New Orleans at the same time lol
     
  15. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    A lot of office buildings have them in NO--after all, the elevators have to go somewhere. There is a special way of building basements in NO, which I remember reading about in the Picayune one time. As it is, high rise buildings have to drive their support pylons a LOOOOONG way down before they can start on the structure itself.

    Bear in mind that when you look at Canal Street, that if you open a manhole cover, there is room underneath for sewer workers to walk around upright, with head room. That's because the street is a paved over canal from a century or so back. Hence the name. Not all the streets in the city are resting on dirt.
     
  16. Texana

    Texana Overreaching

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    Cyberlaw, you have to understand Lousiana culture.

    The legal system is based on the Napoleonic Code and years upon years of corruption. Democrats have run the state and the city of New Orleans for decades, if not centuries.

    It has been a long known fact that students in the public school system were a year to two years behind Texas and other states, that the justice system was thoroughly corrupted, and more than a few dead folks voted in every election. Literally, when you crossed the state line on the interstate into Lousiana, there was a noticeable difference from the very first mile.

    That said, Mr. Texana grew up in New Orleans, and I spent my summers there. We love the state, we love our neighbors there, and we have literally given more than you know, because of that deep and long-enduring love between us and them.

    You can blame George Bush for not reacting quickly enough, but you cannot blame him for the absymal state of the state that existed before the hurricane.
     
  17. reb

    reb New Member

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    yeah, thanks a lot louisiana. that's what we get for trying to help. maybe next time, we will realize it isn't such a good idea to help>?? it's not worth helping if it ends up hurting you more.
     
  18. AdoraBlue

    AdoraBlue I've been known to be a little too "woo-woo."

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    Truer words were never spoken . . .

    And on the Texas note, as a Louisianan I am grateful for the generosity from Texas and every other state, but I will say that if Texas is ever hit by a storm of this magnitude that the people of Louisiana, corrupt and backwards though the state may be, will extend their hands in help.

    And please don't forget the people of Southwest Louisiana. They have been quietly picking up the pieces left by Hurricane Rita. The area is completely devastated.
     
  19. Goody

    Goody New Member

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    Doesn't NO have tunnels running under the city made by pirates in the old days? I have heard people talk about going to NO to rob Merchant Marines and then there are the old shanghai'd stories, where men would be hit in the head and wisked away to work as slaves on ships headed for China. Maybe that is where the "slow boat to China" saying came from.
     
  20. concernedperson

    concernedperson Former Member

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    Don't know but it is sure used a lot in those parts.
     
  21. BillyGoatGruff

    BillyGoatGruff New Member

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    You're thinking of New York & San Francisco, both of which had extensive pirate/privateer caves/tunnels carved into the bluffs overlooking the water. There is a "street" called Pirate's Alley in New Orleans, but that's about it. Pirates in New Orleans didn't have to hide anything from anyone, really, and most of them actually operated out of the bayous, not the city.
    New Orleans only has one tunnel, and that isn't even in the city proper, but out in Gretna, if memory serves, and is only a block long.
     

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