UK Uk- Bedgebury Forest, Kent, Woman, 30-35, 5'1'', brown hair & eyes, ectopic pregnancy, poss. sex worker, viciously murdered with wooden stake, Oct.'79

It looks like Jean was killed after she stopped at a picnic site and the other woman from 1979 was probably found at the deposition site
The other woman, was not deposited anywhere, various posts here have stated the police believe and it would appear, firmly believe, that the unidentified female was killed where she was. There is evidence for this, repeated several times. Including witnesses who saw her there alive.

It would help if people would please read the links and proofs so we don't circle back to wrong information. It is misleading to others. I myself have slipped up and try to edit my posts accordingly if within time or correct myself in another post. I think others have corrected me too for mainly silly mistakes from lack of concentration or forgetfulness, which I am grateful for, so please keep doing that.
 
I'm sure l posted about these murders before but l can't find a thread!
 

''What is the UK National DNA Database?​

  • The UK National DNA Database holds the DNA? profiles and relevant DNA samples from a select number of UK individuals.
  • It is the largest database of its kind in the world and is continuing to grow each year.
  • Every profile in the UK National DNA Database is derived from a sample of human material, such as saliva or hair, collected from a crime scene.
  • The information derived from each profile can be a powerful tool in the fight against crime.
  • If a match is made between a crime scene profile and a profile on the database it can help police to identify a possible suspect.
  • They can then use this DNA information as evidence for demonstrating an individual is guilty of a crime.
  • Searching the database to find a match helps identify a suspect in around 60 per cent of cases.''
2022
''Scotland Yard said it is leading a pilot on behalf of national policing into investigative genetic genealogy, which compares the DNA of an unknown suspect or unidentified victim with samples uploaded by the public onto a genetic genealogy database for likely relatives. It allows genealogists to place relatives into clusters of family trees and work backwards to identify them.

It could be more effective than the gene-tracing techniques used with the national DNA database as it can trace a potential suspect from more distant relatives.

It could lead to genealogy sites being asked to open up their databases to investigating officers. The technique could uncover a person’s family tree if someone as distant as a third cousin uploaded their DNA onto a database. At present, the UK’s database used by police is only searched for close possible relatives such as parents, children or siblings to match a suspect’s DNA.''
.....................................................................................
''The Home Office-commissioned report advised that “unregulated” practice of genetic genealogy database should only be used if necessary and when other methods have been exhausted, and once approved “by the appropriate body”.

The most popular databases, like Ancestry, do not allow police access to solve crime. Others like GEDmatch allow user opt-ins for serious crimes.''
 
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I'm sure l posted about these murders before but l can't find a thread!
Some posts about the varied cold cases got in the mix, re-posting together,








................................................................................................................................
CONNECTED BY PERP'S DNA
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I know various UK agencies are looking into genetic genealogy and its legal and ethical implications. Not just the police. Perhaps now that we're not in the EU, the privacy laws are more flexible. I know this technique has been used in a couple of European countries. Can't remember if that was Sweden (in the EU) or Norway (not in the EU) though.
 
I was wondering about that, too. Since the ectopic did not yet rupture (which would be a serious emergency) but was at bleeding amd cramping stage, she may have intetpreted it as her period. Yes an ectopic hurts in a different place and it is agonizing, but at 6 weeks it still borderline. She may not have been aware of her pregnancy at all, it looks like she had no access to any healthcare or did not want to.
Maybe she did not work and live legally in the UK and was afraid to use any nhs facility since they would surely question her.
Could she have thought she was miscarrying or thought she was having a particularly bad period. Ectopic pregnancies are sometimes missed by doctors especially without an ultrasound. At 6 weeks you might not even know you are pregnant. I remember my mom talking about how home pregnancy tests were more complicated and maybe harder to read in the early 80s. Did the UK have clinics that didn’t care if you were legal in the 70’s? I don’t know about the UK health care system. I barely understand mine lol. In the earlier 2000s I know there were free STD and pregnancy testing clinics or they offered sliding scale prices. They offered birth control and gyno services. That was in the US and in a small city area. Sometimes if you have been pregnant before you notice future pregnancies sooner. I wonder if she would have sought medical care somewhere.
 




 
I know various UK agencies are looking into genetic genealogy and its legal and ethical implications. Not just the police. Perhaps now that we're not in the EU, the privacy laws are more flexible. I know this technique has been used in a couple of European countries. Can't remember if that was Sweden (in the EU) or Norway (not in the EU) though.
Probably Sweden, Swedish police used forensic genetic genealogy to solve a child rape case and a double homicide but then the technique was put on hold for privacy reasons. Not sure what the status is on that now.
 
Probably Sweden, Swedish police used forensic genetic genealogy to solve a child rape case and a double homicide but then the technique was put on hold for privacy reasons. Not sure what the status is on that now.
by A Tillmar · 2021 rbbm

''On the morning of October 19, 2004, an eight-year-old boy and a 56-year-old woman were stabbed to death on an open street in the city of Linköping, Sweden. The perpetrator left his DNA at the crime scene, and after 15 years of various investigation efforts, including more than 9000 interrogations and mass DNA screening of more than 6000 men, there were still no clues about the identity of the unknown murderer. The successful application of investigative genetic genealogy (IGG) in the US raised the interest for this tool within the Swedish Police Authority. After legal consultations it was decided that IGG could be applied in this double murder case as a pilot case study. From extensive DNA analysis, including whole-genome sequencing and genotype imputation, DNA data sets were established and searched within both GEDmatch and FamilyTree DNA genealogy databases. A number of fairly distant relatives were found from which family trees were created. The genealogy work resulted in two candidates, two brothers, one of whom matched the crime scene samples by routine STR profiling. The suspect confessed the murders at the initial police hearing and was later convicted of the murders. In this paper we describe the successful application of an emerging technology. We disclose details of the DNA analyses which, due to the poor quality and low quantity of the DNA, required reiterative sequencing and genotype imputation efforts. The successful application of IGG in this double murder case exemplifies its applicability not only in the US but also in Europe. The pressure is now high on the involved authorities to establish IGG as a tool for cold case criminal investigations and for missing person identifications. There is, however, a continuous need to accommodate legal, social and ethical aspects as well.''
 
I know various UK agencies are looking into genetic genealogy and its legal and ethical implications. Not just the police. Perhaps now that we're not in the EU, the privacy laws are more flexible. I know this technique has been used in a couple of European countries. Can't remember if that was Sweden (in the EU) or Norway (not in the EU) though.
There is an excellent UK government review of this issue at https://assets.publishing.service.g...7f7237cf3e59/BFEG_Genetic_Genealogy_Final.pdf. This clearly identifies that the legal issues derive from matters outside the rules of the EU. Very interestingly it also discusses in detail the availability of databases for comparisons and the likely success rates.
 

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